My brother, in almost every conversation we’ve ever had about work, he’s always said to me, “You have to be humble.” I mean, the job of a reporter is kind of omnidirectional self-abasement, right? You’re going to experts who know more than you about the thing in its kind of structural terms. You’re going to people who are being affected by it in ways that you aren’t, so they know more about how it feels and how it’s working in a way, and certainly their lives, than you do. You’re going to an editor who has a better sense than you do for story structure and how things need to be if they’re going to work. You’re going to readers who ultimately are the judge of your success. I mean it’s a funny position in that way, because you really need to be able to learn from all kinds of different people.

Ezra Klein, Editor in Chief of Vox.com in Esquire’s The Mentorship Project, a series of fifty interviews with men about the mentors who made them who they are today.

In Praise of the Humble Comma
The gods, they say, give breath, and they take it away. But the same could be said — could it not? — of the humble comma. Add it to the present clause, and, of a sudden, the mind is, quite literally, given pause to think; take it out if you wish or forget it and the mind is deprived of a resting place. Yet still the comma gets no respect. It seems just a slip of a thing, a pedant’s tick, a blip on the edge of our consciousness, a kind of printer’s smudge almost. Small, we claim, is beautiful (especially in the age of the microchip). Yet what is so often used, and so rarely recalled, as the comma — unless it be breath itself?
Punctuation, one is taught, has a point: to keep up law and order. Punctuation marks are the road signs placed along the highway of our communication — to control speeds, provide directions and prevent head-on collisions. A period has the unblinking finality of a red light; the comma is a flashing yellow light that asks us only to slow down; and the semicolon is a stop sign that tells us to ease gradually to a halt, before gradually starting up again. — Pico Iyer, 2001. Via Time.

In Praise of the Humble Comma

The gods, they say, give breath, and they take it away. But the same could be said — could it not? — of the humble comma. Add it to the present clause, and, of a sudden, the mind is, quite literally, given pause to think; take it out if you wish or forget it and the mind is deprived of a resting place. Yet still the comma gets no respect. It seems just a slip of a thing, a pedant’s tick, a blip on the edge of our consciousness, a kind of printer’s smudge almost. Small, we claim, is beautiful (especially in the age of the microchip). Yet what is so often used, and so rarely recalled, as the comma — unless it be breath itself?

Punctuation, one is taught, has a point: to keep up law and order. Punctuation marks are the road signs placed along the highway of our communication — to control speeds, provide directions and prevent head-on collisions. A period has the unblinking finality of a red light; the comma is a flashing yellow light that asks us only to slow down; and the semicolon is a stop sign that tells us to ease gradually to a halt, before gradually starting up again. — Pico Iyer, 2001. Via Time.

Middle East Hate Matrix Middle East Love Matrix Syria Hate Matrix Syria Love Matrix Middle East

Love, Hate & Other Difficulties in the Middle East

David McCandless & UniversLab created an interactive visualization of the relationships between countries and entities in the Middle East, along with those that exert influence on them.

Images from the Top: Those that hate each other; that that love each other; those that hate Syria (left); those that love Syria (right); and, probably, the most apt visualization, those whose relationships are “complicated” (bottom). Via Information is BeautifulSelect to embiggen. 

The data and sourcing McCandles & Universlab use can be viewed via this spreadsheet, and they invite feedback and updated information as relationships evolve. 

Wanted: Half-Baked Sex Columnist
Like sex? Like pot? Know how to write about it?
The Cannabist, the Denver Post’s marijuana news and culture site, is looking for a columnist to “write about sex, relationships, intimacy, gender issues and more as it all relates to a world where marijuana is becoming legal — and oftentimes present in the bedroom.”
Details and application requirements are here. Deadline for applying is October 1.
Related: Former FJP intern Krissy Eliot writes about her experience with THC lube for the San Francisco Bay Guardian, where she’s now a sex columnist.

Wanted: Half-Baked Sex Columnist

Like sex? Like pot? Know how to write about it?

The Cannabist, the Denver Post’s marijuana news and culture site, is looking for a columnist to “write about sex, relationships, intimacy, gender issues and more as it all relates to a world where marijuana is becoming legal — and oftentimes present in the bedroom.”

Details and application requirements are here. Deadline for applying is October 1.

Related: Former FJP intern Krissy Eliot writes about her experience with THC lube for the San Francisco Bay Guardian, where she’s now a sex columnist.

Not All Males Have Pimped Out Genitalia…

Which, if you put it that way, means that some do.

Via BBC Earth:

Welcome to the wonderfully twisted realm of sexual organs.

This is a world where penises may double as weapons during violent combat, or as lassos to snag a mate - often against her will.

It’s a world where semen can exert powerful mind control over a female, and vaginas can act to deliberately help or hinder the age-old race of sperm to egg.

And it’s a world so full of carnal conflicts of interest and deception that only now are biologists getting to grips with all of its ins and outs, including an understanding of why human sex may be about pleasure rather than pain.

This is where we learn that after mating in the air, a drone honeybee flies away but leaves his penis behind; flatworms are hermaphrodites that engage in penis fencing to see who’ll be the father and who’ll be the mother; and that squids don’t “attempt to inseminate humans - although with at least 16 such cases on the medical books the behavior is more common than one might think.”

Images: BBC Earth, The Twisted World of Sexual Organs. Select to embiggen.

Imagined Conversations: NFL & Access Journalism Edition

In which we pull together different voices talking about the relationship between reporter and sources, and discover there’s a grudging admiration for the oft-maligned TMZ.

Brian Stelter: Any time the NFL is the story, the networks’ coverage of the story is very closely watched, because ESPN, CBS, NBC, and FOX all have multi-billion-dollar contracts to carry NFL games. Their news divisions have to cover the news, but their parent companies have to protect their investments in football.

Stefan Fatsis: [I]t’s no surprise that NFL-owned media would tiptoe around stories questioning the integrity and credibility of the NFL. The [Ray] Rice case is a reminder of how the nearly $10 billion-a-year NFL’s rise to cultural prominence has allowed it to shape the message transmitted to fans, both through its quasi-journalistic arms and through multibillion-dollar deals with other media.

Kelly McBride: [But] this is a much different story than if the Super Dome was ready for the Super Bowl or even if the NFL is ignoring the data on concussions… This is a story about the culture of the NFL. It’s hard for journalists because they are a part of the NFL culture.

Margaret Sullivan: In some ways, this is the eternal problem of the beat reporter (or specialized writer or critic): When you cover a subject for many years, familiarity can turn into friendship.

Michael Hiltzik: To a certain extent, journalists have always been at risk of becoming “captured” by their sources, or their subjects; it takes a high degree of professional discipline to fight the magnetic tug, and the best journalists make their careers that way. But the closer one is to the center of power, the less inclined one might be to write a report that will get one bounced from the inner circle.

Stefan Fatsis: [B]y hiring veteran reporters at their proprietary websites and cable networks — at higher salaries than those paid by the newspapers and magazines where the reporters formerly worked — the NFL and other pro sports leagues have managed to reduce the amount of critical daily reporting and commentary. That might not be the direct intention, but it’s the result.

Dave McKenna: The chosen few disseminators of football intelligence are multimedia stars today, with gigs in print and online and on TV and radio, and with huge Twitter presences… The NFL need only filter the message of a very few folks to shape the entire national discussion.

Stefan Fatsis: Like Wall Street and other big institutions, the NFL prefers and… facilitates access reporting. It’s good business. The steady flow of information on the ESPN ticker keeps NFL fans engaged with the product and wanting more of it. As far as accountability journalism is concerned, it seems like no coincidence that the Rice story broke thanks to the gatecrashers at TMZ — a bunch of outsiders who have much to gain from knocking pro football down a peg, and are willing to write checks to buy up the sort of photos and videos that tarnish the NFL’s vaunted shield.

Michael Hiltzik: The sports leagues and companies that set up their own news outlets pretend that their only goal is to provide useful information to fans, customers or members of the public who can no longer get it from a fragmented news industry. That’s a scam; powerful entities have always resented having their public statements filtered by skeptical intermediaries in the press — or worse, having their secrets exposed.

David Zurawik: TMZ did the job the mainstream sports media failed to do in showing us the ugliness of this incident.

Amanda Hess: What makes TMZ so effective? Unlike prosecutors (who hedge their bets to ensure they only prosecute people who juries will convict) and league officials (who are invested in selling athletes as heroes), TMZ has an economic imperative to administer uncompromising takedowns. And unlike traditional journalistic outlets, it’s willing to pay for tips, tapes, and documents to back them up.

Mark Mravic: [TMZ] is applying to sports the hardcore tabloid-type approach that has worked so well for them when they are covering celebrities. And there really hasn’t been an outlet that’s been doing that in sports. It shows what can be done when you can actually start digging around and you’re willing to pay a lot of money for things — if that’s exactly how TMZ is getting these clips.

Michael Hiltzik: That’s why outsiders are often responsible for the biggest news breaks. Watergate was initially exposed not by members of the White House press corps, but by a couple of police reporters named Woodward and Bernstein. The Ray Rice video wasn’t acquired and aired by members of the NFL press corps, but by the scandal-mongering upstart TMZ.

Stefan Fatsis: It’s also fair to say, though, that the Rice video has changed how Roger Goodell’s NFL will be covered going forward. The league’s media lapdogs have started barking, and they might not stop until the commissioner is gone.

We have had a hard time thinking clearly about companies like Google and Facebook because we have never before had to deal with companies like Google and Facebook. They are something new in the world, and they don’t fit neatly into our existing legal and cultural templates. Because they operate at such unimaginable magnitude, carrying out millions of informational transactions every second, we’ve tended to think of them as vast, faceless, dispassionate computers — as information-processing machines that exist outside the realm of human intention and control. That’s a misperception, and a dangerous one.

Modern computers and computer networks enable human judgment to be automated, to be exercised on a vast scale and at a breathtaking pace. But it’s still human judgment. Algorithms are constructed by people, and they reflect the interests, biases, and flaws of their makers. As Google’s founders themselves pointed out many years ago, an information aggregator operated for commercial gain will inevitably be compromised and should always be treated with suspicion. That is certainly true of a search engine that mediates our intellectual explorations; it is even more true of a social network that mediates our personal associations and conversations.

Because algorithms impose on us the interests and biases of others, we have not only a right, but also an obligation to carefully examine and, when appropriate, judiciously regulate those algorithms. We have a right and an obligation to understand how we, and our information, are being manipulated. To ignore that responsibility, or to shirk it because it raises hard problems, is to grant a small group of people — the kind of people who carried out the Facebook and OKCupid experiments — the power to play with us at their whim.

Nicholas Carr, Los Angeles Review of Books. The Manipulators: Facebook’s Social Engineering Project.

FJP: For more on tech, media and algorithms, check our Algorithms Tag.

Too Many, Probably Way Too Many
An app that does a simple thing: tells you how often and where you check your phone. The results could be discouraging.
Via The Oracle:

A recent study released by Baylor University, published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, examined 24 cellphone related activities from 164 college students and found that women spend an average of 10 hours a day on their cellphones while men spend about eight. Of the activities measured, applications such as Pinterest and Instagram were significantly associated with an addiction to cellphone use. 
The idea of cellphone addiction might seem melodramatic but evidence suggests it’s real and here to stay. Fitness magazine reports a recent survey found 84 percent of the world’s population said they couldn’t go a day without using their cellphone and two thirds of teens and adults checked their phones every 15 minutes. 

Interested in the Baylor study? It’s available here (PDF).
Filed under: Things we’re not sure we want to know.
Image: Partial screenshot, CheckyApp.

Too Many, Probably Way Too Many

An app that does a simple thing: tells you how often and where you check your phone. The results could be discouraging.

Via The Oracle:

A recent study released by Baylor University, published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, examined 24 cellphone related activities from 164 college students and found that women spend an average of 10 hours a day on their cellphones while men spend about eight. Of the activities measured, applications such as Pinterest and Instagram were significantly associated with an addiction to cellphone use. 

The idea of cellphone addiction might seem melodramatic but evidence suggests it’s real and here to stay. Fitness magazine reports a recent survey found 84 percent of the world’s population said they couldn’t go a day without using their cellphone and two thirds of teens and adults checked their phones every 15 minutes. 

Interested in the Baylor study? It’s available here (PDF).

Filed under: Things we’re not sure we want to know.

Image: Partial screenshot, CheckyApp.

To Be or Not To Be: Scotland Has a Decision to Make
Image: Map of countries that have declared independence from the United Kingdom, via Global Post. Select to embiggen.

To Be or Not To Be: Scotland Has a Decision to Make

Image: Map of countries that have declared independence from the United Kingdom, via Global Post. Select to embiggen.

Behind-the-Scenes GoPro

For those curious about what kind of GoPro rigs athletes use. Also, The New Yorker does make videos and some of them are kinda interesting.

This.
Because Girls Who Code.
If You Suddenly Find Yourself Covering Gender-Based Violence
Ray Rice’s assault on his wife put domestic violence front and center of the news where it’s being covered by many who have no experience reporting on the issue.
Enter WITNESS’ guide for conducting interviews with survivors of gender-based violence. It’s an important resource for those thinking of interviewing survivors about the issue, or reporting on gender-based violence more deeply.
Via the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma:

The Guide to Interviewing Survivors of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence is an illustrated how-to resource for documenting the stories of survivors of sexual and gender-based violence safely, effectively and ethically.
Designed for human rights activists, advocates, citizen journalists and filmmakers, the guide covers prep and planning for conducting and sharing interviews, and helps navigate the terrain of social stigma and shame, threats of retribution by perpetrators and/or institutions that may wish to bury the story and the imperative to ensure the emotional and physical safety of interview subjects.

The guide can be downloaded here. A companion video series can be viewed here.
Image: Cover detail, via WITNESS.

If You Suddenly Find Yourself Covering Gender-Based Violence

Ray Rice’s assault on his wife put domestic violence front and center of the news where it’s being covered by many who have no experience reporting on the issue.

Enter WITNESS’ guide for conducting interviews with survivors of gender-based violence. It’s an important resource for those thinking of interviewing survivors about the issue, or reporting on gender-based violence more deeply.

Via the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma:

The Guide to Interviewing Survivors of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence is an illustrated how-to resource for documenting the stories of survivors of sexual and gender-based violence safely, effectively and ethically.

Designed for human rights activists, advocates, citizen journalists and filmmakers, the guide covers prep and planning for conducting and sharing interviews, and helps navigate the terrain of social stigma and shame, threats of retribution by perpetrators and/or institutions that may wish to bury the story and the imperative to ensure the emotional and physical safety of interview subjects.

The guide can be downloaded here. A companion video series can be viewed here.

Image: Cover detail, via WITNESS.

David Rees Goes Even Deeper

The same (former political cartoonist) David Rees who taught us how to properly sharpen a pencil has his own How-To show on National Geographic called Going Deep with David Rees, and the first season is now free to watch on Hulu

Rees is fun to watch because of his undying enthusiasm and curiosity for otherwise ordinary subject matter, but also because the show is educational and inspiring without trying to hard to be. And it’s refreshing to see someone in search of the simple yet rewarding things in life (see: How to Climb a Tree). I would say it might be the new show to contend with MythBusters, but it’s got an entirely different sense of humor and an original premise that lends itself to more and more great episodes. 

But seriously: Go watch this video first, and you’ll understand Rees pretty well. In case you’re still not convinced, he’s also good friends with the brilliant John Hodgman. —Mariana

I would love it if transparency truly allayed anxiety in an informed, nonexplosive way,” Mr. Rudder told me. But in practice, he said, “it might increase anxiety.

Natasha Singer (writing in the Times) about Christian Rudder, president of OkCupid and the guy who wrote this, whose new book: Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One’s Looking) just came out.

Singer writes:

Mr. Rudder says he carefully considers the potential risks of OkCupid’s observational and product research on its members. But his dual role as the approver of company research and its chief interpreter is complicated.

“The people who are making the minimal risk decisions are the same people conducting the experiments,” he acknowledges. “It is a conflict of interest.”

Now Mr. Rudder is weighing the possibility of even greater research transparency. His book certainly urges companies to share more of their behavioral research findings with the public. But the outcry over his recent blog post suggests that many consumers are not aware of the extent to which companies already scrutinize and manipulate their online activities.

FJP: While the issues around social manipulation and the need for transparency make themselves pretty apparent, Rudder’s comment, quoted above, points to something perplexing. Maybe greater transparency about both data-gathering practices and interpretations of it (especially on networks where people have social and emotional investments) would increase our anxiety about what the data says about us. It echoes (in sentiment) something Kate Crawford wrote in The New Inquiry in May called The Anxieties of Big Data that’s also really worth reading. In it, she deconstructs the myth that more data means greater accuracy and also points this out: 

If we take these twinned anxieties — those of the surveillers and the surveilled — and push them to their natural extension, we reach an epistemological end point: on one hand, the fear that there can never be enough data, and on the other, the fear that one is standing out in the data.

More Reading: A pretty interesting long-form profile on Rudder. A fantastic essay from danah boyd on ethics and oversight in data manipulation. And, from the FJP archives, a reading list on the social, cultural and political issues/possibilities surrounding big data.