The FJP

Apr 19

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Apr 18

[video]

Apr 17

[video]

Happy Teen Literature Day
As libraries across America celebrate Teen Lit Day, Readergirlz and some co-sponsors are hosting Operation Teen Bookdrop, which you can participate in too:

* Follow @readergirlz on Twitter and tweet #rockthedrop* Print a copy of the bookplate and insert it into a book (or 10!) On April 18th, drop a book in a public spot (park bench, bus seat, restaurant counter?) Lucky finders will see that the book is part of ROCK THE DROP! (If you think people won’t pick up the book, slap a Post-It or note on the front cover that reads, “Take this book - IT’S FREE!” Bonus points for using recycled paper and/or making your own funky design!)* Post the banner at your blog and social networks. Proclaim that you will ROCK THE DROP! * Snap a photo of your drop and post it at the readergirlz Facebook page. Then tweet the drop at #rockthedropwith all the other lovers of YA books.

See books that people have been dropping all day via the Twitter hashtag #rockthedrop.
Bonus: Our (well, Jihii’s) favorite teen fiction? Everything by Sarah Dessen but especially this and this.

Happy Teen Literature Day

As libraries across America celebrate Teen Lit Day, Readergirlz and some co-sponsors are hosting Operation Teen Bookdrop, which you can participate in too:

* Follow @readergirlz on Twitter and tweet #rockthedrop
Print a copy of the bookplate and insert it into a book (or 10!) On April 18th, drop a book in a public spot (park bench, bus seat, restaurant counter?) Lucky finders will see that the book is part of ROCK THE DROP! 
(If you think people won’t pick up the book, slap a Post-It or note on the front cover that reads, “Take this book - IT’S FREE!” Bonus points for using recycled paper and/or making your own funky design!)
Post the banner at your blog and social networks. Proclaim that you will ROCK THE DROP! 
Snap a photo of your drop and post it at the readergirlz Facebook page. Then tweet the drop at #rockthedropwith all the other lovers of YA books.

See books that people have been dropping all day via the Twitter hashtag #rockthedrop.

Bonus: Our (well, Jihii’s) favorite teen fiction? Everything by Sarah Dessen but especially this and this.

Why was ‘Dasani’ shut out of the Pulitzers? -

Remember this beautiful long-form piece from the NY Times that came out last fall? It was met with a wide array of reactions, some very appreciative, some very unhappy. Over the last few months, Columbia J-School’s Bill Grueskin set out to gather perspectives on why:

I don’t know why Dasani was shut out of not just a Pulitzer, but a nomination from jurors. It did, after all, win a coveted Polk award earlier this year. And though I work just down the hall from the office of Pulitzer Administrator Sig Gissler, I know less about the internal machinations of jurors and board members now than I did when I was a city editor at the Miami Herald in the 1990s. But I do know that many readers found the Dasani story, for all its soaring prose and worthy ambitions, a difficult piece of work.

To understand more about why the piece elicited such strong reactions on both sides, I reached out to about 50 people shortly after the series ended last December. I blind copied them on an email in which I invited them to take part in a private, online discussion about the series. They emailed their thoughts, and I compiled and shared them. We abided by “Chatham House Rules,” which allow quotes to be used—but not the names or affiliations of the people who said them.

The group included journalists, scientists, lawyers, faculty members and a few former and current Columbia students. It also included alumni of the Times, but not current staff, nor any Pulitzer board members.

Why did I pick this story to examine? In part because the Times thought it to be so significant. Its public editor, Margaret Sullivan, called the series “the largest investigation The Times has published all at once in its history.” Moreover, it was stirring up a tremendous reaction, not just among journalists but all around New York City. Indeed, two of Michael Bloomberg’s deputy mayors took to the edit page of the Wall Street Journal to defend their boss’ record on homelessness.

FJP: He compiles the reactions here, a predominant one being that it shouldn’t have been produced as a single story. They are worth looking through because they touch on some ethical and a lot of design issues that are relevant across the industry. These considerations shouldn’t be the absolute measure on what makes a story prize-worthy  because Dasani certainly is a compelling and generally well-executed narrative. But they are still worth thinking about. —Jihii

“One of the things that we do is ask product managers to go travel to an emerging-market country to see how people who are getting on the Internet use it. They learn the most interesting things. People ask questions like, ‘It says here I’m supposed to put in my password — what’s a password?’” —

Mark Zuckerberg in a Q&A with Farhad Manjoo, Can Facebook Innovate? 

Covers a lot of questions about the company and what it’s trying to do. Also see his column, The Future of Facebook May Not Say ‘Facebook’.

Apr 15

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top
Via BBC.

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top

Via BBC.

Apr 14

“There’s a term for this. Social psychologists, journalists and social-media users call it “lifestyle envy,” or Instagram envy, and savvy smartphone users are well-acquainted with its tell-tale sign: the little pang you get when a friend posts photos from his or her swanky vacation in Istanbul, or when actress Mindy Kaling snaps her newest pair of spike-toe Christian Louboutain pumps.” —

Lane Anderson in The Instagram Effect: How the Psychology of Envy Drives ConsumerismDeseret News.

The piece is part of a series called The Ten Today, which examines the relevance of the 10 Commandments in contemporary society. It’s kind of a a fascinating endeavor. The publication, which, as Nieman Lab reports, just came out of beta, is fascinating in itself:

The Deseret News is owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but you might not detect its Mormon roots from looking at the outlet’s national site — officially came out of beta yesterday — which focuses on the self-proclaimed values of family and faith. Even in its faith section, which includes stories as wide ranging as a preview of a new PBS documentary on the history of the Jews and a piece on the Hindu holiday of Holi, there’s very little explicit coverage of Mormonism.

FJP: So most of the articles (see: popular content, for example) comes out of a set of curious, general-interesty questions about American society and the role that spirituality and family plays out in our daily lives. While most new news projects are following the niche-news-serving-narrow-interests trend, it’s an interesting ambition to keep an eye on: a publication aiming to hit such a broad audience and broad set of topics topics from a strangely narrow space. —Jihii

The Crossroads of Should and Must
An absolute must-read from artist Elle Luna on Medium on leaving her job at Mailbox to make art. Complete with beautiful illustrations and heaps of wisdom on when to follow “must” and when to follow “should” in life and work (which shouldn’t be two separate things).
Image: Screenshot from the illustrated piece.
Related: Another fantastic read (this one from David Cain), on why procrastination is not laziness.

The Crossroads of Should and Must

An absolute must-read from artist Elle Luna on Medium on leaving her job at Mailbox to make art. Complete with beautiful illustrations and heaps of wisdom on when to follow “must” and when to follow “should” in life and work (which shouldn’t be two separate things).

Image: Screenshot from the illustrated piece.

Related: Another fantastic read (this one from David Cain), on why procrastination is not laziness.

Too Many Friends
Via Web Urbanist:

In a world of mobile devices, share icons and popup alerts, fine art is interrupted by signs and symbols of our times, adding a jarring layer of technology to recognizably classic works.
Nastya Nudnik is the Kiev-based Ukrainian artist behind this project that pairs emoticons and other digital features with familiar images by renowned artists, from Michelangelo to Edward Hopper.

Nudnik’s work can be viewed on Behance.

Too Many Friends

Via Web Urbanist:

In a world of mobile devices, share icons and popup alerts, fine art is interrupted by signs and symbols of our times, adding a jarring layer of technology to recognizably classic works.

Nastya Nudnik is the Kiev-based Ukrainian artist behind this project that pairs emoticons and other digital features with familiar images by renowned artists, from Michelangelo to Edward Hopper.

Nudnik’s work can be viewed on Behance.

Apr 11

In Praise of Sources

'Journalism is impossible without brave sources'—@ggreenwald at #PolkAwards

— Peter Maass (@maassp)
April 11, 2014

Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen
From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar. 
Via Charles Apple.

Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen

From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar

Via Charles Apple.

Under 18, Live in California and Want to Get Stupid Stuff You Posted Off the Internet? There's a Law for That -

Via VentureBeat:

On January 1, 2015, being a minor on the Internet will get a lot less embarrassing.

That’s the date the Golden State’s revision to the so-called California Online Privacy Protection Act, or CalOPPA, goes into effect. The tweak is being referred to as the so-called “Internet Eraser Law.”

Websites – Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and yes, even Craiglist – take notice:

The revision allows for Californians 18 and younger to wipe content and personal information posted to any website. That content can include, for example, online chats, audio, and photographs. The law will effect websites incorporated in different states that minors access from California…

…The update means 18 year-olds and younger can remove incriminating party pictures or most other content they’ve posted in the past that could someday come back to haunt them.

Let it be so for all ages.

“Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.” —

Strunk and White, Elements of Style.

Always a good reminder, and a reminder that you can download Elements of Style for free. PDF | eBook