A new Pew Internet and American Life Project survey explores how people learn about their local communities.
Our friend the newspaper still leads the way. Most don’t recognize that though.
Via Pew:

On the surface, most people do not feel that their local newspaper is a key source that they rely on for local information. For instance, when asked, “If your local newspaper no longer existed, would that have a major impact, a minor impact, or no impact on your ability to keep up with information and news about your local community?” a large majority of Americans, 69%, believe the death of their local newspaper would have no impact (39%) or only a minor impact (30%) on their ability to get local information.
Younger adults, age 18-29, were especially unconcerned. Fully 75% say their ability to get local information would not be affected in a major way by the absence of their local paper. The same was true of heavier technology users: 74% of home broadband users say losing their paper would have no impact or only a minor impact on their ability to get local information.
Yet when asked about specific local topics and which sources they rely on for that information, it turns out that many adults are quite reliant on newspapers and their websites. Of the 16 specific local topics queried, newspapers ranked as the most, or tied as the most, relied upon source for 11 of the 16. 

Image: Via Six Revisions.

A new Pew Internet and American Life Project survey explores how people learn about their local communities.

Our friend the newspaper still leads the way. Most don’t recognize that though.

Via Pew:

On the surface, most people do not feel that their local newspaper is a key source that they rely on for local information. For instance, when asked, “If your local newspaper no longer existed, would that have a major impact, a minor impact, or no impact on your ability to keep up with information and news about your local community?” a large majority of Americans, 69%, believe the death of their local newspaper would have no impact (39%) or only a minor impact (30%) on their ability to get local information.

Younger adults, age 18-29, were especially unconcerned. Fully 75% say their ability to get local information would not be affected in a major way by the absence of their local paper. The same was true of heavier technology users: 74% of home broadband users say losing their paper would have no impact or only a minor impact on their ability to get local information.

Yet when asked about specific local topics and which sources they rely on for that information, it turns out that many adults are quite reliant on newspapers and their websites. Of the 16 specific local topics queried, newspapers ranked as the most, or tied as the most, relied upon source for 11 of the 16. 

Image: Via Six Revisions.

  1. hackingthenews reblogged this from onaissues and added:
    I wonder how different stats would be in our community, where the paper still hasn’t lost a whole lot of ground to the...
  2. jordanwb reblogged this from onaissues and added:
    It’s interesting that TV dominates local politics. That seems like it would be the most complex, and thus requiring the...
  3. onaissues reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
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  8. andrewcnelson reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    Vital source for news …
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