Train-Surfing in Bangladesh
Via Slate:

…In the process of documenting train riders for the project, [Bangladeshi photographer G.M.B.] Akash encountered hundreds of low-paid workers for whom roof-surfing was an economic necessity. He met mothers squeezed onto the small spaces between carriages, nothing protecting their babies from the moving rails below except their arms. He met homeless children with nowhere particular to go, who simply enjoy living dangerously. He captured all these characters in bold color, their purple shirts and clashing paisley prints infiltrating routine commutes with deceptively joyous electricity. 
When Akash was growing up in Bangladesh, photography was not considered a career. The idea that a boy would want to dedicate himself to pictures was incomprehensible to the aspiring doctors and engineers around him.
“People had no knowledge at that time how a photographer could change the world,” he says.

Image: Helaluddin, 18, on his off-day from the plastic factory where he works in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Via Slate.

Train-Surfing in Bangladesh

Via Slate:

…In the process of documenting train riders for the project, [Bangladeshi photographer G.M.B.] Akash encountered hundreds of low-paid workers for whom roof-surfing was an economic necessity. He met mothers squeezed onto the small spaces between carriages, nothing protecting their babies from the moving rails below except their arms. He met homeless children with nowhere particular to go, who simply enjoy living dangerously. He captured all these characters in bold color, their purple shirts and clashing paisley prints infiltrating routine commutes with deceptively joyous electricity. 

When Akash was growing up in Bangladesh, photography was not considered a career. The idea that a boy would want to dedicate himself to pictures was incomprehensible to the aspiring doctors and engineers around him.

People had no knowledge at that time how a photographer could change the world,” he says.

Image: Helaluddin, 18, on his off-day from the plastic factory where he works in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Via Slate.

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    Viola: In South Asia, particularly India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, the poor always push their children to escape...
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