New York Times Releases Collaboration Plugin for WordPress
Via Poynter:

More and more journalists use blogging platforms to write and edit stories, but those text editors are pretty basic: It’s not easy to see what changes others have made to a post. And two people can open the same post, overwriting one another’s edits.
The New York Times has solved those problems for online journalists by building a tool that will track changes in a browser-based text editor. The tool, called ICE (for Integrated Content Editor) was built so that it will work with a variety of text editors; the Times has already built plugins for WordPress and TinyMCE, a common text editor used in blogging platforms…
…A demo of the Times’ text editor shows how it works. Changes made by different users are marked with strikethroughs or highlights. A user can press a button to accept or reject a particular change or all of them. It looks a lot  like revision tracking in Microsoft Word.
ICE is more sophisticated than the “track revisions” function in WordPress, which shows the previous version of a story but doesn’t highlight the exact changes. And while WordPress shows those revisions on another screen, with ICE they appear in the text editing window, right where you add links and boldface text.

ICE Demo. Download ICE from GitHub.
Image: Screenshot from the ICE demo page showing highlighted updates. When a user mouses over yellow text, they see who inserted the changes.

New York Times Releases Collaboration Plugin for WordPress

Via Poynter:

More and more journalists use blogging platforms to write and edit stories, but those text editors are pretty basic: It’s not easy to see what changes others have made to a post. And two people can open the same post, overwriting one another’s edits.

The New York Times has solved those problems for online journalists by building a tool that will track changes in a browser-based text editor. The tool, called ICE (for Integrated Content Editor) was built so that it will work with a variety of text editors; the Times has already built plugins for WordPress and TinyMCE, a common text editor used in blogging platforms…

…A demo of the Times’ text editor shows how it works. Changes made by different users are marked with strikethroughs or highlights. A user can press a button to accept or reject a particular change or all of them. It looks a lot  like revision tracking in Microsoft Word.

ICE is more sophisticated than the “track revisions” function in WordPress, which shows the previous version of a story but doesn’t highlight the exact changes. And while WordPress shows those revisions on another screen, with ICE they appear in the text editing window, right where you add links and boldface text.

ICE Demo. Download ICE from GitHub.

Image: Screenshot from the ICE demo page showing highlighted updates. When a user mouses over yellow text, they see who inserted the changes.

  1. therapy-by-phone reblogged this from onaissues
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  3. mauricecherry reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    Very cool! I tried this out on one of my test blogs, and I can definitely see where it would be beneficial for...
  4. socialcubix reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    New York Times Releases Collaboration Plugin for WordPress Via Poynter: More and more journalists use blogging platforms...
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  7. imskyhigh reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    New York Times Releases Collaboration Plugin for WordPress The New York Times has solved those problems for online...
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  10. zeddified reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    NYT giving to the online community. Very nice.
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