Shirin Neshat, Women of Allah
Via the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

This photograph forms part of Neshat’s Women of Allah series, created between 1993 and 1997 after the artist’s first trip to Iran after the Revolution. The aesthetic of these black-and-white photographs, in which women (the artist and others) appear in veils (chadors), often bearing firearms, mimics newspaper clippings she gathered that depicted the involvement of women in the Iran-Iraq War. Neshat used these images to comment on the violence of the 1979 Iranian Revolution, after which she was barred from entering the country, and later on post-Revolution society in Iran. Historically, the role of women in Iran is fraught with repression and restriction. Thus, feminist poetry was an important source of inspiration for Neshat’s series of photographs. The verses handwritten on the photographs reinforce Neshat’s feminist beliefs (she often quotes the poet Furugh Farrukhzad) and also engage with images of violence.

Image: Via Tradition and Modernity in flux: Visual Binaries in Contemporary Iranian Photography.

Shirin Neshat, Women of Allah

Via the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

This photograph forms part of Neshat’s Women of Allah series, created between 1993 and 1997 after the artist’s first trip to Iran after the Revolution. The aesthetic of these black-and-white photographs, in which women (the artist and others) appear in veils (chadors), often bearing firearms, mimics newspaper clippings she gathered that depicted the involvement of women in the Iran-Iraq War. Neshat used these images to comment on the violence of the 1979 Iranian Revolution, after which she was barred from entering the country, and later on post-Revolution society in Iran. Historically, the role of women in Iran is fraught with repression and restriction. Thus, feminist poetry was an important source of inspiration for Neshat’s series of photographs. The verses handwritten on the photographs reinforce Neshat’s feminist beliefs (she often quotes the poet Furugh Farrukhzad) and also engage with images of violence.

Image: Via Tradition and Modernity in flux: Visual Binaries in Contemporary Iranian Photography.

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    Women of Allah shot by Shirin Neshat Created between 1993-1997
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