[W]e tend to think of the information age as something entirely new. In fact, people have been wrestling with information for many centuries. If I was going to say when the information age started, I would probably say the 15th century with the invention of the mechanical clock, which turned time into a measurable flow, and the printing press, which expanded our ability to tap into other kinds of thinking. The information age has been building ever since then.

In an interview with The Browser, Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains, discusses a number of books that inform his thinking. 

The Browser, Nicholas Carr on Impact of the Information Age.

Click through for the interview and Carr’s book recommendations

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