Nathan Jurgenson in the latest issue of The New Inquiry (to which I just subscribed):

On Pinterest, we do not collectively fail at creating a “real self” as we do on Facebook. The curated Pinterest pinboards of perfectly prepared cupcakes, flawless bathroom designs, and precious haircuts make no claim to represent the full complexities of reality or self-identity. And Instagram, too, makes obvious an image-mediated unreality that’s precisely the opposite of Facebook’s claim to be the sum of one’s whole life.
Facebook is a lot like identity performance offline—our online and offline identities were never that separate to begin with. We propagate the myth of identity as being natural, authentic and spontaneous and forget what thinkers like Erving Goffman and Judith Butler have painstakingly illustrated: identity, on and offline, is a performance. 

FJP: It is quite an enjoyable read. On a side note, well done digital subscription strategy. First the cover design intrigued me. Then the only $2 per month for digital/ipad issues hooked me. Then the “It’s easy! If you have an Amazon.com account, you don’t even need to pull out your credit card,” got me in. Plus the issue is all about digital things and humanities things. The best! —Jihii
Bonus: Check out the Arguing the Web Mixtape to accompany this issue. 

Nathan Jurgenson in the latest issue of The New Inquiry (to which I just subscribed):

On Pinterest, we do not collectively fail at creating a “real self” as we do on Facebook. The curated Pinterest pinboards of perfectly prepared cupcakes, flawless bathroom designs, and precious haircuts make no claim to represent the full complexities of reality or self-identity. And Instagram, too, makes obvious an image-mediated unreality that’s precisely the opposite of Facebook’s claim to be the sum of one’s whole life.

Facebook is a lot like identity performance offline—our online and offline identities were never that separate to begin with. We propagate the myth of identity as being natural, authentic and spontaneous and forget what thinkers like Erving Goffman and Judith Butler have painstakingly illustrated: identity, on and offline, is a performance. 

FJP: It is quite an enjoyable read. On a side note, well done digital subscription strategy. First the cover design intrigued me. Then the only $2 per month for digital/ipad issues hooked me. Then the “It’s easy! If you have an Amazon.com account, you don’t even need to pull out your credit card,” got me in. Plus the issue is all about digital things and humanities things. The best! —Jihii

Bonus: Check out the Arguing the Web Mixtape to accompany this issue. 

18 notes

Show

  1. wizardblue reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  2. spectacularoptical reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  3. danclark reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  4. futurejournalismproject posted this

Blog comments powered by Disqus