NASA Has a Data Problem, And a Contest to Solve It
NASA has about 100 terabytes of information gathered from its various space missions. The data sits in various databases created over the years and is difficult to get to and manipulate.
So its Tournament Lab is holding a contest make the data more accessible to both scientists and the public.
Via the NASA Tournament Lab:

[W]hile rich in depth and breath, the [Planetary Data System] databases have developed in a disparate fashion over the years with different architectures and formats for different scientific needs; thereby making acquisition of data problematic!
So, NASA is holding a series of Challenges to generate some simply awesome ideas for mobile or web based applications that will appeal to general users, to search and display compelling facts about the data. Instead of just scientists, our audience will be the millions of school age students, their teachers and parents, game designers and general civilians of the world. We want to deliver this incredible data to users in a way that excites them – and thus, to help them understand the value and potential of this data.

Contest prizes are up to $10,000 and you can learn about it here. If you want to jump right into the data, you can do so here.
Image: Moscow at Night, captured March 28 by the International Space Station. Via NASA.

NASA Has a Data Problem, And a Contest to Solve It

NASA has about 100 terabytes of information gathered from its various space missions. The data sits in various databases created over the years and is difficult to get to and manipulate.

So its Tournament Lab is holding a contest make the data more accessible to both scientists and the public.

Via the NASA Tournament Lab:

[W]hile rich in depth and breath, the [Planetary Data System] databases have developed in a disparate fashion over the years with different architectures and formats for different scientific needs; thereby making acquisition of data problematic!

So, NASA is holding a series of Challenges to generate some simply awesome ideas for mobile or web based applications that will appeal to general users, to search and display compelling facts about the data. Instead of just scientists, our audience will be the millions of school age students, their teachers and parents, game designers and general civilians of the world. We want to deliver this incredible data to users in a way that excites them – and thus, to help them understand the value and potential of this data.

Contest prizes are up to $10,000 and you can learn about it here. If you want to jump right into the data, you can do so here.

Image: Moscow at Night, captured March 28 by the International Space Station. Via NASA.

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    If only I took science classes more seriously in high school…
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