Reports on the media habits of Millennials, those “digital natives”, have given some the impression that young people never read newspapers. However, survey evidence stubbornly insists that they do.

Wrote Katy Pape at NPR’s Go Figure, on a survey of millennials that reported 52% of people ages 18 to 24 read a newspaper up to 14 times a month.

It’s the heavy reading, though, that betrays their age: only 22% of millennials read the newspaper on a daily basis, as opposed to the 40% of all adults.

But the most interesting part? The prestige that comes with a heavy newspaper diet:

Heavy newspaper readers (groups I and II) are 75% more likely than light/non readers (groups IV and V) to hold a graduate degree. Heavy readers are also more than twice as likely to be considered “Influentials,” meaning people who participate in three or more public engagement activities every year (such as writing a letter to an elected official, running for public office, or attending a public meeting).

But that can’t mean that one needs to read the paper to be an important person in civic life. It just means that we’re in a shift, hopefully, which we all probably know already.

Just ask Scott M. Fulton:

The ongoing death of newspapers is not about changes in journalism, or the need for them. It is about a business model that has ceased to be relevant in the face of present technology.

FJP: Think LP vs. CD? Or, actually, CD vs. mp3.

"News just reads better on paper, man."

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