From the Times’ article Joe Weisenthal vs. the 24-Hour News Cycle

Weisenthal’s bosses, well aware of his insane work schedule, worry about burnout. Someone else now works the 4 a.m. shift at least once each week, generally Thursdays, so he can sleep. And every month or so, Weisenthal says that he just completely crashes and can’t muster the energy to do anything else but watch a full day of television.
“We also ensure that he takes his vacations,” Julie Hansen, the company’s president and chief operating officer, said. “I think he’s figured out by now that that’s good.”
But it’s hard to unplug. In early March he left work just after 5 p.m. to take his wife to a fancy birthday dinner at Babbo, the Mario Batali restaurant in the West Village.
By 8 p.m. he was back at his computer, tweeting and blogging.

From the Times’ article Joe Weisenthal vs. the 24-Hour News Cycle

Weisenthal’s bosses, well aware of his insane work schedule, worry about burnout. Someone else now works the 4 a.m. shift at least once each week, generally Thursdays, so he can sleep. And every month or so, Weisenthal says that he just completely crashes and can’t muster the energy to do anything else but watch a full day of television.

“We also ensure that he takes his vacations,” Julie Hansen, the company’s president and chief operating officer, said. “I think he’s figured out by now that that’s good.”

But it’s hard to unplug. In early March he left work just after 5 p.m. to take his wife to a fancy birthday dinner at Babbo, the Mario Batali restaurant in the West Village.

By 8 p.m. he was back at his computer, tweeting and blogging.

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