Creating the Newsroom, Literally

I can amuse myself watching time-lapse videos on just about anything but this one, following the construction of Venezuela’s Cadena Capriles’ new integrated newsroom, is a joy to follow.

The company publishes three newspapers and several magazines, and its new building brings print and online journalists together in a 3,300 square foot newsroom.

"You are watching a ‘one kitchen, several restaurants’ concept," explains Juan Antonio Giner, President of Innovation Media Consulting, in an email to the FJP. “It’s a 300 people newsroom sharing services and resources, producing first class relevant content for 3 newespapers, radio and magazines under one open space roof in a state of the art facility.”

Time once was that reporters were separated across floors in buildings, or in different buildings completely. Here were the print reporters, over there those that worked on the web, somewhere else entirely those that worked on television and radio. By bringing them all together, the hope is to increase collaboration and reduce redundant costs.

In 2008, the World Editors Forum and Reuters released a study that surveyed editors and news executives from 120 countries about their vision for the future of the newsroom. At the time, 86% of respondents believed integrated newsrooms similar to what Cadena Capriles has created here would be the norm.

"Multimedia output is better served with multimedia input sharing resources," explains Giner on the trend. Call it integrated, call it convergence, it’s a recognition that no matter the end delivery platform, news organizations need to have all their resources together and collaboratively pulling in the same direction.

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