Bienvenidos a FJP Latin America
Ever since we launched the Future Journalism Project we’ve tried to cover important media developments around the world. This is hard though. Our sources when doing so are primarily in English so we miss out on the nuance and important local stories that occur every day.
This summer we decided to do something about it: globalize.
And today we’re psyched to announce the launch of FJP Latin America. (Follow on Tumblr. Follow on Twitter).
Edited by José L. Leyva and Roberto Juárez-Garza, FJP Latin America will focus on media, journalism, society and technology from Mexico to Tierra Del Fuego with relevant linkages to Spain and the Latino communities in the US and Canada. We’ll do so by monitoring Spanish-language media and other primary sources, translating them into English, and then commenting upon and analyzing what we find (again, in English) for the non-Spanish speakers among us.
José is a Fulbright Scholar working around the clock at the intersection of technology, journalism and politics. He has two master’s degrees from Columbia University, one in journalism and digital media at the Graduate School of Journalism and another in International Affairs from the School of International and Public Affairs. He is based in Mexico City. (Follow José on Twitter).
Roberto holds a master’s degree in International Studies from the University of Washington with a dual concentration on Latin America and international communications. After spending 7 years in Seattle working as a communications strategist and volunteering for a handful of local non-profits, he is now based in Monterrey, Mexico. (Follow Roberto on Twitter and Google+).
We’ve been working on this behind the scenes and if you visit FJP Latin America you can learn about:
How violence against journalists has forced a Mexican University to shut down its undergraduate journalism program.
An Open Source bus tour’s 5,000 mile journey through South America promoting freedom of expression.
Univision’s attempts to get a Latino to moderate a US Presidential debate.
There’s much much more of course. And there will be much much more. 
Contributors Welcome
Latin America is an exceptionally large and diverse place. If you’re interested in being a part of this initiative, José and Roberto are putting together a team of contributors from countries throughout the region. You can get in touch via the contact info below. You can also submit individual stories, images, links and video via the Submit Page.
If you have tips, queries, suggestions or any other questions, email us at LatAm [at] theFJP [dot] org, or hit us up in the FJP Latin America Ask Box.
We’re super excited about this launch and give José and Roberto giant abrazos for joining the FJP. — Michael
Follow FJP Latin America on Tumblr  Follow FJP Latin America on Twitter
And if you haven’t, follow the FJP (and on Twitter we’re over here).

Bienvenidos a FJP Latin America

Ever since we launched the Future Journalism Project we’ve tried to cover important media developments around the world. This is hard though. Our sources when doing so are primarily in English so we miss out on the nuance and important local stories that occur every day.

This summer we decided to do something about it: globalize.

And today we’re psyched to announce the launch of FJP Latin America. (Follow on Tumblr. Follow on Twitter).

Edited by José L. Leyva and Roberto Juárez-Garza, FJP Latin America will focus on media, journalism, society and technology from Mexico to Tierra Del Fuego with relevant linkages to Spain and the Latino communities in the US and Canada. We’ll do so by monitoring Spanish-language media and other primary sources, translating them into English, and then commenting upon and analyzing what we find (again, in English) for the non-Spanish speakers among us.

José is a Fulbright Scholar working around the clock at the intersection of technology, journalism and politics. He has two master’s degrees from Columbia University, one in journalism and digital media at the Graduate School of Journalism and another in International Affairs from the School of International and Public Affairs. He is based in Mexico City. (Follow José on Twitter).

Roberto holds a master’s degree in International Studies from the University of Washington with a dual concentration on Latin America and international communications. After spending 7 years in Seattle working as a communications strategist and volunteering for a handful of local non-profits, he is now based in Monterrey, Mexico. (Follow Roberto on Twitter and Google+).

We’ve been working on this behind the scenes and if you visit FJP Latin America you can learn about:

There’s much much more of course. And there will be much much more. 

Contributors Welcome

Latin America is an exceptionally large and diverse place. If you’re interested in being a part of this initiative, José and Roberto are putting together a team of contributors from countries throughout the region. You can get in touch via the contact info below. You can also submit individual stories, images, links and video via the Submit Page.

If you have tips, queries, suggestions or any other questions, email us at LatAm [at] theFJP [dot] org, or hit us up in the FJP Latin America Ask Box.

We’re super excited about this launch and give José and Roberto giant abrazos for joining the FJP. — Michael

Follow FJP Latin America on Tumblr
Follow FJP Latin America on Twitter

And if you haven’t, follow the FJP (and on Twitter we’re over here).

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    LJ Digital: Can’t wait to see this publication keep growing!
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    Some major props to FJP for coming up with a spin-off of a great publication. Read the full announcement here.
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    Bienvenidos a FJP Latin America Ever since we launched the Future Journalism Project we’ve tried to cover important...
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