It’s nice and all, but please quit telling me to be safe.

In a July Facebook post, freelance journalist Austin Tice explained to friends why he was going to Syria to report on the civil war. In large part it was to feel “alive”:

So that’s why I came here to Syria, and it’s why I like being here now, right now, right in the middle of a brutal and still uncertain civil war. Every person in this country fighting for their freedom wakes up every day and goes to sleep every night with the knowledge that death could visit them at any moment. They accept that reality as the price of freedom. They realize there are things worth fighting for, and instead of sitting around wringing their hands about it, or asking their lawyer to file an injunction about it, they’re out there just doing it. And yeah most of them have little idea what they’re doing when they pick up a rifle, and yes there are many other things I could complain about, but really who cares. They’re alive in a way that almost no Americans today even know how to be. They live with greater passion and dream with greater ambition because they are not afraid of death.

Unfortunately, the Washington Post reports that Tice has not been heard from and his current whereabouts are unknown:

The family of Austin Tice, an American freelance journalist who has been reporting from Syria for The Washington Post and other news organizations, said Thursday that it has not heard from him for more than a week and is concerned for his welfare.

Tice, 31, a Georgetown University law student who previously served as an infantry officer in the Marine Corps, reported from Syria this summer. His work, which has been published by The Post, McClatchy Newspapers and other outlets, has offered vivid and insightful accounts of the civil war.

After entering Syria across the Turkish border in May, Tice spent time with rebel fighters in the north. He traveled to Damascus in late July, becoming one of the few Western journalists reporting from the capital. Tice intended to leave Syria in mid-August. Family members and editors who have worked with Tice have not heard from him since then.

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