The Wall Street Journal’s Smart Phone Video Network
Earlier this week the Wall Street Journal launched WorldStream, a video feed of short, raw clips taken by its reporters with their smartphones.
Each video comes in under a minute and, as Poynter reports, the goal is to create a type of reporter “status update” of where they are and what they’re reporting on.
Audiences have shown that they like short form, raw video — especially if it’s of the breaking news variety — and WorldStream will create a large library of it. For quality control, only WSJ reporters submit to the site (unlike, say, CNN’s iReport) and even then editors vet the submissions.
While individual videos can be linked to, right now there doesn’t appear to be a way for third parties to embed them on their own sites.
A future, interesting move could be for in-house editors to start mixing and matching submitted videos to create larger packaged stories.
On the business side, video commands much larger ad dollars than display advertising against article content but I’m not sure how or where you’d integrate pre, post or overlay advertising on videos that run so short. Still, publications such as the WSJ sell out of their video inventory and here’s a relatively quick and easy way to expand their offerings while also providing audiences a more intimate look at a news story. — Michael
Image: Screenshot of WorldStream’s GOP2012 convention tag with Gov. Chris Christie’s appearance on stage before his speech. The video can be watched here.

The Wall Street Journal’s Smart Phone Video Network

Earlier this week the Wall Street Journal launched WorldStream, a video feed of short, raw clips taken by its reporters with their smartphones.

Each video comes in under a minute and, as Poynter reports, the goal is to create a type of reporter “status update” of where they are and what they’re reporting on.

Audiences have shown that they like short form, raw video — especially if it’s of the breaking news variety — and WorldStream will create a large library of it. For quality control, only WSJ reporters submit to the site (unlike, say, CNN’s iReport) and even then editors vet the submissions.

While individual videos can be linked to, right now there doesn’t appear to be a way for third parties to embed them on their own sites.

A future, interesting move could be for in-house editors to start mixing and matching submitted videos to create larger packaged stories.

On the business side, video commands much larger ad dollars than display advertising against article content but I’m not sure how or where you’d integrate pre, post or overlay advertising on videos that run so short. Still, publications such as the WSJ sell out of their video inventory and here’s a relatively quick and easy way to expand their offerings while also providing audiences a more intimate look at a news story. — Michael

Image: Screenshot of WorldStream’s GOP2012 convention tag with Gov. Chris Christie’s appearance on stage before his speech. The video can be watched here.

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