[D]emands for after-the-fact quote approval by sources and their press aides have gone too far.”

The practice risks giving readers a mistaken impression that we are ceding too much control over a story to our sources,” it says. “In its most extreme form, it invites meddling by press aides and others that goes far beyond the traditional negotiations between reporter and source over the terms of an interview.

Memorandum from New York TImes Executive Editor Jill Abramson to staff.

According to Margaret Sullivan, the Times Public Editor, a new policy is now in place that prohibits “after the fact” quote approval. 

The issue has gained attention since a July story by Jeremy Peters outlined how reporters often submit quotes to political campaign aides for approval before running a story.

New York Times, In New Policy, The Times Forbids After-the-Fact ‘Quote Approval’.

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