Monitoring Online Freedom
Freedom House has a new study about the cat and mouse game played between governments and activists over Internet freedom. The report takes a close look at 47 countries and rates how their Internet and media policies affect their citizens.
Key findings include:
New laws restrict free speech;
Bloggers and ordinary users increasingly face arrest for political speech on the web;
Physical attacks against government critics are intensifying;
Paid commentators, hijacking attacks are proliferating;
Surveillance is increasing, with few checks on abuse;
Citizen pushback is yielding results.
Via Freedom House:

Brutal attacks against bloggers, politically motivated surveillance, proactive manipulation of web content, and restrictive laws regulating speech online are among the diverse threats to internet freedom emerging over the past two years, according to a new study released today by Freedom House. Despite these threats, Freedom on the Net 2012: A Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Media found that increased pushback by civil society, technology companies, and independent courts resulted in several notable victories.
“The findings clearly show that threats to internet freedom are becoming more diverse. As authoritarian rulers see that blocked websites and high-profile arrests draw local and international condemnation, they are turning to murkier—but no less dangerous—methods for controlling online conversations,” said Sanja Kelly, project director for Freedom on the Net at Freedom House.
The battle over internet freedom comes at a time when nearly one third of the world’s population has used the internet. Governments are responding to the increased influence of the new medium by seeking to control online activity, restricting the free flow of information, and otherwise infringing on the rights of users. The methods of control are becoming more sophisticated, and tactics previously evident in only the most repressive environments—such as governments instigating deliberate connection disruptions or hiring armies of paid commentators to manipulate online discussions—are appearing in a wider set of countries.
Freedom on the Net 2012, which identifies key trends in internet freedom in 47 countries, evaluates each country based on barriers to access, limits on content, and violations of user rights.
The study found that Estonia had the greatest degree of internet freedom among the countries examined, while the United States ranked second. Iran, Cuba, and China received the lowest scores in the analysis. Eleven other countries received a ranking of Not Free, including Belarus, Saudi Arabia, Uzbekistan, and Thailand. A total of 20 of the 47 countries examined experienced a negative trajectory in internet freedom since January 2011, with Bahrain, Pakistan, and Ethiopia registering the greatest declines.

First, give it up for Estonia. Second, pay close attention to the importance of activism and citizen pushback against governmental restrictions on speech and Internet freedom.
Freedom House, Freedom on the Net 2012: a Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Medoia.
Image: Detail from a larger chart on how selected governments restrict their citizens Internet and free speech rights. Via Freedom House (PDF). Select to embiggen.

Monitoring Online Freedom

Freedom House has a new study about the cat and mouse game played between governments and activists over Internet freedom. The report takes a close look at 47 countries and rates how their Internet and media policies affect their citizens.

Key findings include:

  • New laws restrict free speech;
  • Bloggers and ordinary users increasingly face arrest for political speech on the web;
  • Physical attacks against government critics are intensifying;
  • Paid commentators, hijacking attacks are proliferating;
  • Surveillance is increasing, with few checks on abuse;
  • Citizen pushback is yielding results.

Via Freedom House:

Brutal attacks against bloggers, politically motivated surveillance, proactive manipulation of web content, and restrictive laws regulating speech online are among the diverse threats to internet freedom emerging over the past two years, according to a new study released today by Freedom House. Despite these threats, Freedom on the Net 2012: A Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Media found that increased pushback by civil society, technology companies, and independent courts resulted in several notable victories.

“The findings clearly show that threats to internet freedom are becoming more diverse. As authoritarian rulers see that blocked websites and high-profile arrests draw local and international condemnation, they are turning to murkier—but no less dangerous—methods for controlling online conversations,” said Sanja Kelly, project director for Freedom on the Net at Freedom House.

The battle over internet freedom comes at a time when nearly one third of the world’s population has used the internet. Governments are responding to the increased influence of the new medium by seeking to control online activity, restricting the free flow of information, and otherwise infringing on the rights of users. The methods of control are becoming more sophisticated, and tactics previously evident in only the most repressive environments—such as governments instigating deliberate connection disruptions or hiring armies of paid commentators to manipulate online discussions—are appearing in a wider set of countries.

Freedom on the Net 2012, which identifies key trends in internet freedom in 47 countries, evaluates each country based on barriers to access, limits on content, and violations of user rights.

The study found that Estonia had the greatest degree of internet freedom among the countries examined, while the United States ranked second. Iran, Cuba, and China received the lowest scores in the analysis. Eleven other countries received a ranking of Not Free, including Belarus, Saudi Arabia, Uzbekistan, and Thailand. A total of 20 of the 47 countries examined experienced a negative trajectory in internet freedom since January 2011, with Bahrain, Pakistan, and Ethiopia registering the greatest declines.

First, give it up for Estonia. Second, pay close attention to the importance of activism and citizen pushback against governmental restrictions on speech and Internet freedom.

Freedom House, Freedom on the Net 2012: a Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Medoia.

Image: Detail from a larger chart on how selected governments restrict their citizens Internet and free speech rights. Via Freedom House (PDF). Select to embiggen.

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    Questions of internet freedom are incredibly — and increasingly — problematic. The chart is interesting on its own, but...
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