Times-Picayune Publishes Last Daily
Yesterday the New Orleans paper the Times-Picayune officially published its last daily. It will begin selling Wednesday, Friday and Saturday papers and deliver a tabloid following Saints games, but will focus publishing “day and night” on its site NOLA.com, according to a front page note to readers yesterday.
Here’s its last front page:

While there are many digital first newsrooms, few have the Times-Picayune’s long, rich history. For some good reading, see this collection of its Hurricane Katrina coverage, which won the paper a Pulitzer Prize in 2006.
The paper’s departure makes New Orleans the largest metropolitan area in the country without a daily. That loss is felt by many, according to the Times:

Kathy Anderson, who worked for the paper as a photographer for 26 years, remembers going to the French Quarter for an assignment years ago. She saw two homeless people sitting on a bench with a newspaper and arguing the finer points of a political column — something it is hard to imagine happening with a tablet computer.

Image: Robert Fogarty, Dear World.

Times-Picayune Publishes Last Daily

Yesterday the New Orleans paper the Times-Picayune officially published its last daily. It will begin selling Wednesday, Friday and Saturday papers and deliver a tabloid following Saints games, but will focus publishing “day and night” on its site NOLA.com, according to a front page note to readers yesterday.

Here’s its last front page:

While there are many digital first newsrooms, few have the Times-Picayune’s long, rich history. For some good reading, see this collection of its Hurricane Katrina coverage, which won the paper a Pulitzer Prize in 2006.

The paper’s departure makes New Orleans the largest metropolitan area in the country without a daily. That loss is felt by many, according to the Times:

Kathy Anderson, who worked for the paper as a photographer for 26 years, remembers going to the French Quarter for an assignment years ago. She saw two homeless people sitting on a bench with a newspaper and arguing the finer points of a political column — something it is hard to imagine happening with a tablet computer.

Image: Robert Fogarty, Dear World.

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    Damn. Really heartbreaking to see this.
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