Bidding on Your Personal Browser History

Proclivity Media and others are working very hard to find out what you want to buy, and they’re getting to know you very well along the way.

Here’s the backstory: one particularly savvy way of advertising has begun receiving a lot of attention lately. It’s called re-targeting, and it relies on personal browser history to figure out what users may want to buy.

Automated programming bids on ad space individual users see based on their personal search history, more traditional consumer reports and retailer records, selling one-time ads at several hundred dollars a pop.

via Internet Retailer:

Proclivity uses its Consumer Valuation Platform to place cookies in consumers’ web browsers to monitor their browsing behavior around the Internet and tracks their specific interactions on a client retailer’s site using tiny pieces of embedded software code in site content. Proclivity adds data from the retailer, including the merchant’s own web analytics on shoppers’ click activity, and information on sales, merchandizing campaigns and product pricing, then scores it to determine when each customer is likely to buy and at what price point.

This is very similar to Facebook Exchange, which has been working cautiously well since June.

Here’s the Wall Street Journal:

Facebook is using its data trove to study the links between Facebook ads and members’ shopping habits at brick-and-mortar stores, part of an effort to prove the effectiveness of its $3.7 billion annual ad business to marketers.

FJP: This is big data at work — for many businesses, there’s a lot to find when comparing data sets that follow consumer behavior online and in stores.

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