How we share what we share.
The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal looks at data from ShareThis, the company that makes the ubiquitous “share this” button you see on Web sites, to see how people spread the word about Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. 

While the Twitter and Facebook shares have the same rough shape, the details are interesting. Twitter sharing is much spikier, possibly driven by subevents in the overall narrative. And during the key hour in which Mubarak resigned, Twitter and Facebook sharing came very close to intersecting. Turning to the Facebook graph, you realize how big a beast the site really is. Its pattern conforms roughly to U.S. web traffic as a whole, peaking around 1:00 p.m.

How we share what we share.

The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal looks at data from ShareThis, the company that makes the ubiquitous “share this” button you see on Web sites, to see how people spread the word about Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. 

While the Twitter and Facebook shares have the same rough shape, the details are interesting. Twitter sharing is much spikier, possibly driven by subevents in the overall narrative. And during the key hour in which Mubarak resigned, Twitter and Facebook sharing came very close to intersecting. Turning to the Facebook graph, you realize how big a beast the site really is. Its pattern conforms roughly to U.S. web traffic as a whole, peaking around 1:00 p.m.

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