FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver analyzed a month’s worth of citations to the Web’s top English language news sites. The top 30 above is a good indicator of reach and influence:

The way I’ve determined to study this is pretty simple. I’ve tracked the number of times that the publication’s name has appeared in Google News and Google Blog Search over the past month, followed by the word “reported.” For instance, to track the number of citations for The Chicago Tribune, I’d look for instances of the phrase “Chicago Tribune reported.” (In some cases, I’ve permitted multiple search terms for the same news outlet — for example, both “BBC reported” and “BBC News reported.”)
Obviously, there are other ways that a news outlet’s reporting might be referenced: “according to The Guardian” as opposed to “The Guardian reported.” So this won’t capture every time that an outlet’s reporting is cited; the idea, instead, is that it should be a representative sample.

Silver chose the sites analyzed by taking the top 100 blogs from Technorati, the top 100 circulation newspapers in the United States, the top 100 newspapers in global circulation and Memeorandum’s top 100 news sources.
His full list can be viewed here.

FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver analyzed a month’s worth of citations to the Web’s top English language news sites. The top 30 above is a good indicator of reach and influence:

The way I’ve determined to study this is pretty simple. I’ve tracked the number of times that the publication’s name has appeared in Google News and Google Blog Search over the past month, followed by the word “reported.” For instance, to track the number of citations for The Chicago Tribune, I’d look for instances of the phrase “Chicago Tribune reported.” (In some cases, I’ve permitted multiple search terms for the same news outlet — for example, both “BBC reported” and “BBC News reported.”)

Obviously, there are other ways that a news outlet’s reporting might be referenced: “according to The Guardian” as opposed to “The Guardian reported.” So this won’t capture every time that an outlet’s reporting is cited; the idea, instead, is that it should be a representative sample.

Silver chose the sites analyzed by taking the top 100 blogs from Technorati, the top 100 circulation newspapers in the United States, the top 100 newspapers in global circulation and Memeorandum’s top 100 news sources.

His full list can be viewed here.

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