The Geography of a Tweet
A team of researchers lead by GDELT co-creator Kalev Leetaru gained access to the Twitter decahose last October and November and examined 1.5 billion tweets from 71 million users.
Among the many things they parsed from the two terabytes of data was the average physical distance between an original tweet its retweet: Some 749 miles (1205 km).
For @ mentions, the average distance between one user referencing another when exact geolocation is known is 744 miles (1197 km).
The paper, Mapping the Global Twitter Heartbeat: The Geography of Twitter, also includes the geographic difference between mainstream news media and news items from Twitter:

Mainstream media appears to have significantly less coverage of Latin America and vastly better greater of Africa. It also covers China and Iran much more strongly, given their bans on Twitter, as well as having enhanced coverage of India and the Western half of the United States. Overall, mainstream media appears to have more even coverage, with less clustering around major cities.

Image: Detail, Network map showing locations of users retweeting other users (geocoded Twitter Decahose tweets 23 October 2012 to 30 November 2012), via FirstMonday.org. Select to embiggen.

The Geography of a Tweet

A team of researchers lead by GDELT co-creator Kalev Leetaru gained access to the Twitter decahose last October and November and examined 1.5 billion tweets from 71 million users.

Among the many things they parsed from the two terabytes of data was the average physical distance between an original tweet its retweet: Some 749 miles (1205 km).

For @ mentions, the average distance between one user referencing another when exact geolocation is known is 744 miles (1197 km).

The paper, Mapping the Global Twitter Heartbeat: The Geography of Twitter, also includes the geographic difference between mainstream news media and news items from Twitter:

Mainstream media appears to have significantly less coverage of Latin America and vastly better greater of Africa. It also covers China and Iran much more strongly, given their bans on Twitter, as well as having enhanced coverage of India and the Western half of the United States. Overall, mainstream media appears to have more even coverage, with less clustering around major cities.

Image: Detail, Network map showing locations of users retweeting other users (geocoded Twitter Decahose tweets 23 October 2012 to 30 November 2012), via FirstMonday.org. Select to embiggen.

67 notes

Show

  1. aloonsh reblogged this from nendoblr
  2. nendoblr reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  3. wtheckisgoingon reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  4. miracleviolet reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  5. gelcoat reblogged this from sid766
  6. monochromeweb reblogged this from sid766
  7. dragonslayer-demonhunter reblogged this from sid766
  8. sid766 reblogged this from ceevee5
  9. sophyaferreira reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  10. jessocallaghan reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  11. sydewalks reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  12. thenagainmaybeitsme reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  13. marcellano reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    Curiosa la relevancia de México y República Dominicana. Hay un vértice que no me queda claro si está en el estado de...
  14. 17piecesofhappiness reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  15. anjaliauden reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  16. tuliomalaspina reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  17. saradcaldwell reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  18. zabotage reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  19. cristinasalazar reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  20. garveypotter reblogged this from futurejournalismproject

Blog comments powered by Disqus