Hello, Facebook Graph Search
Facebook Graph Search is rolling out to all users over the next few weeks. If you’re unfamiliar with its capabilities the basic rundown is that it’s a highly personalized search engine that lets you query information based on what your friends, friends of friends and oftentimes public (depending on privacy settings) are liking.
As Salon’s Andrew Leonard explains it:

Facebook allows you to slice and dice your network with astonishing ease. “Friends who like ‘Dumb and Dumber’”? Friends who like porn films?” “Single women who like to read Thomas Pynchon and live in California?”
After each search: Presto! A page full of profile pictures — many of whom are probably people you’ve never seen before, because Graph Search rummages through your “friends of friends” network, a grouping that is exponentially larger than your mere “friends” network.
You can also search through photo albums that have been made public. For example: “Photos of single men taken in California.” Oh, the douchebaggery. We have so much to be embarrassed about, and now Facebook makes it easier than ever to find it.
Graph Search is addictive. “Photos of beaches liked my friends”? Sure! “Friends of my friends who like Edward Snowden Support Page”? Absolutely. “Friends of my friends who like Rush Limbaugh?” Holy moly! There are more Limbaugh fans in my extended network than porn film fans! Something is very wrong here.

Have privacy concerns? Don’t want your pickle eating, Justin Bieber, complicated relationship, trashy novel liking life to be shown? We got you covered in two easy steps.
First, visit Facebook’s 3 Tips About Search Privacy to get an overview of what you’re sharing and who you’re sharing it with. Second, Slate’s Will Oremus walks readers through changing their privacy settings en masse, or on a post by post basis. Or, as Slate’s headlines writers put it: If You’ve Ever Posted Anything Embarrassing on Facebook, Now Is the Time to Hide It.
Image: Facebook Graph Search, via Facebook.

Hello, Facebook Graph Search

Facebook Graph Search is rolling out to all users over the next few weeks. If you’re unfamiliar with its capabilities the basic rundown is that it’s a highly personalized search engine that lets you query information based on what your friends, friends of friends and oftentimes public (depending on privacy settings) are liking.

As Salon’s Andrew Leonard explains it:

Facebook allows you to slice and dice your network with astonishing ease. “Friends who like ‘Dumb and Dumber’”? Friends who like porn films?” “Single women who like to read Thomas Pynchon and live in California?”

After each search: Presto! A page full of profile pictures — many of whom are probably people you’ve never seen before, because Graph Search rummages through your “friends of friends” network, a grouping that is exponentially larger than your mere “friends” network.

You can also search through photo albums that have been made public. For example: “Photos of single men taken in California.” Oh, the douchebaggery. We have so much to be embarrassed about, and now Facebook makes it easier than ever to find it.

Graph Search is addictive. “Photos of beaches liked my friends”? Sure! “Friends of my friends who like Edward Snowden Support Page”? Absolutely. “Friends of my friends who like Rush Limbaugh?” Holy moly! There are more Limbaugh fans in my extended network than porn film fans! Something is very wrong here.

Have privacy concerns? Don’t want your pickle eating, Justin Bieber, complicated relationship, trashy novel liking life to be shown? We got you covered in two easy steps.

First, visit Facebook’s 3 Tips About Search Privacy to get an overview of what you’re sharing and who you’re sharing it with. Second, Slate’s Will Oremus walks readers through changing their privacy settings en masse, or on a post by post basis. Or, as Slate’s headlines writers put it: If You’ve Ever Posted Anything Embarrassing on Facebook, Now Is the Time to Hide It.

Image: Facebook Graph Search, via Facebook.

  1. chrischelberg reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    Graph Search is just about here. Fix things up people, or lock them down.
  2. dimwen reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  3. thepandabaker reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
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  8. irellicunt said: Good thing I deleted my Facebook.
  9. forgottenbones reblogged this from misantropo and added:
    Once again, we are Borg. Resistance is futile.
  10. misantropo reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    Altro che l’NSA.
  11. polidigitalaffairs reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
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  14. futurejournalismproject posted this