Come to Think of It, There Should be a Museum of Malware
Via Mousse Magazine

The first computer viruses were harmless experiments, tiny digital pranks spread across pre-Web networks. These viruses, written by computer scientists and amateur coders, didn’t do much but self-replicate. No data was stolen, no hard drives harmed. But as the Internet became monetized, so did viruses. Within a few decades, economic and political incentives drove viruses to become mercenary and weaponized, and academic exercises evolved into to a vast ecosystem of malware. Artist, writer, and programmer John Menick proposes these electronic viruses and their malicious relatives are not analogies for their biological counterparts. Instead, they are all on the edge of life, neither alive nor dead, replicating and mutating machines, parasitic and productive.

Image: Hakkar the Soulflayer from World of Warcraft, via Mousse Magazine. “Controlled by the game’s artificial intelligence, Hakkar is a vampire who, among other talents, drains attacking players of their blood to replenishing his own health. The game’s programmers also provide Hakkar with a spell, or debuff, called corruption of blood, which temporarily contaminates an avatar’s blood, sapping it of some life.”

Come to Think of It, There Should be a Museum of Malware

Via Mousse Magazine

The first computer viruses were harmless experiments, tiny digital pranks spread across pre-Web networks. These viruses, written by computer scientists and amateur coders, didn’t do much but self-replicate. No data was stolen, no hard drives harmed. But as the Internet became monetized, so did viruses. Within a few decades, economic and political incentives drove viruses to become mercenary and weaponized, and academic exercises evolved into to a vast ecosystem of malware. Artist, writer, and programmer John Menick proposes these electronic viruses and their malicious relatives are not analogies for their biological counterparts. Instead, they are all on the edge of life, neither alive nor dead, replicating and mutating machines, parasitic and productive.

Image: Hakkar the Soulflayer from World of Warcraft, via Mousse Magazine. “Controlled by the game’s artificial intelligence, Hakkar is a vampire who, among other talents, drains attacking players of their blood to replenishing his own health. The game’s programmers also provide Hakkar with a spell, or debuff, called corruption of blood, which temporarily contaminates an avatar’s blood, sapping it of some life.”

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