Who Owns a Journalists' Twitter Account? →

Reportr has a head scratcher about BBC News political correspondent Laura Kuenssberg and her Twitter account.

Under her @BBCLauraK handle she’d built up a following of almost 60,000 people. Now that she’s moving on to ITVNews the question is does she need to give it up?

The simple thing would be to change the handle to @ITVLauraK but life isn’t always so simple. Instead, she’s starting from scratch.

Via Reportr:

Social media creates an opportunity for journalists to interact on a personal level with audiences.

Even if an account is branded as a “BBC” journalist, it blurs the traditional barrier between the professional and personal as tweets tend to reflect the personality of the reporter.

It marks a further step in the shift from the institutional to the individual brand of the journalist, identified by the State of the Media report in 2009: “Through search, e-mail, blogs, social media and more, consumers are gravitating to the work of individual writers and voices, and away somewhat from institutional brand.”

On the one hand, having BBC attached to your name will get you more attention. On the other, having LauraK attached to its brand gets the BBC added attention.

Something to think about if you slap your organization’s call letters before your name.

  1. stltomorrow reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  2. nusca reblogged this from futurejournalismproject and added:
    I mentioned this as a warning to some colleagues once during a social media presentation. They laughed a little,...
  3. africanlens reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
  4. kevinscherrer answered: My understanding is, as a journalist the contacts you make are yours. Not sure why Twitter “contacts” would be different.
  5. daveburdick answered: Weird, fuzzy world. I had this issue on YouTube years ago after leaving a comedy duo, despite having the account “daveburdick.”
  6. darylelockhart reblogged this from futurejournalismproject
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