That media likes to talk about media is nothing new, unless of course the media has done something very wrong and would like everyone to look the other way.
Such is the case in the ongoing phone tapping scandal in which UK tabloids hired private investigators to eavesdrop on the calls of celebrities, politicians, the families of slain soldiers and even the family of a missing girl.
Writing in the the Spectator, Peter Osborne notes that News International, the Rupert Murdoch-owned company whose papers are at the center of the scandal, is attempting to keep a lid on coverage by flexing its political muscle and simply not reporting it in its papers.
As Osborne notes, News International owns the Times, the Sunday Times, the News of the World and the Sun: a full third of the domestic newspaper market.
In this graphic, he shows the number of times each newspaper is known to have eavesdropped, and the number of subsequent articles they’ve written about the scandal.
Not reporting the news, of course, isn’t limited to England. Earlier this year NBC was taken to task when its news division remained silent amid reports that its parent company GE did not pay corporate taxes.
Update: Via SoupSoup - “News Corporation will close its tabloid News of the World after this Sunday’s edition, as a result of an escalating phone hacking scandal, James Murdoch said on Thursday.”

That media likes to talk about media is nothing new, unless of course the media has done something very wrong and would like everyone to look the other way.

Such is the case in the ongoing phone tapping scandal in which UK tabloids hired private investigators to eavesdrop on the calls of celebrities, politicians, the families of slain soldiers and even the family of a missing girl.

Writing in the the Spectator, Peter Osborne notes that News International, the Rupert Murdoch-owned company whose papers are at the center of the scandal, is attempting to keep a lid on coverage by flexing its political muscle and simply not reporting it in its papers.

As Osborne notes, News International owns the Times, the Sunday Times, the News of the World and the Sun: a full third of the domestic newspaper market.

In this graphic, he shows the number of times each newspaper is known to have eavesdropped, and the number of subsequent articles they’ve written about the scandal.

Not reporting the news, of course, isn’t limited to England. Earlier this year NBC was taken to task when its news division remained silent amid reports that its parent company GE did not pay corporate taxes.

Update: Via SoupSoup - “News Corporation will close its tabloid News of the World after this Sunday’s edition, as a result of an escalating phone hacking scandal, James Murdoch said on Thursday.”

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