Posts tagged with ‘Al Jazeera’

Mapping Online Reaction to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Al Jazeera has an animated timeline map of prominent hashtags used on Twitter during the ongoing Gaza conflict.

The map runs from June 17 to July 17 and covers hashtags such as #BringBackOurBoys (when three Israelis disappeared while hitchhiking), #MohammadAbuKhdair (when a Palestinian teenager was killed in Jerusalem) and, of course, #IsraelUnderFire and #GazaUnderAttack.

Select to embiggen and view the color key for the screenshots above, or, better, read through to watch the timeline unfold. 

Some context: We’ve written before about PR and propaganda surrounding the Gazan war. Here are a few more:

  • New York Times: At Front Lines, Bearing Witness in Real Time.
  • The Economist: Us and Them — The pummelling of Gaza has cost Israel sympathy not just in Europe, but also among Americans.
  • Quartz: Twitter hashtags are finally neutralizing the Israeli government’s propaganda.
  • CNN Reliable Sources: Red News/Blue News — the Middle East PR war.

Geek notes: The timeline map was put together with CartoDB’s Oddyssey.js.

Al Jazeera’s Looking for Six Global Fellows
Al Jazeera’s AJ+ is launching this fall. With it, they’re hiring six global fellows. Some basic details:

We’re on the hunt for six seriously stellar young people from around the globe to make up our first class of AJ+ Fellows.
It’s a one-year gig, it’s paid, and it’s an opportunity unlike anything else, an opportunity to be at the heart of the next generation of storytellers. Throughout the year, you’ll work with and learn from our core AJ+ team. You’ll join us in our adventure as we introduce AJ+ to the world, and you’ll be a valuable part of making sure this introduction unfolds with fireworks.

The fellowship begins with a 2-3 week stint in San Francisco before heading back to your home region.
Major Qualification: You “have to be downright obsessed with the news and trends in your region and — just as importantly — with the pursuit of unearthing untold stories.”
Deadline to Apply: August 1. Details and application here.

Al Jazeera’s Looking for Six Global Fellows

Al Jazeera’s AJ+ is launching this fall. With it, they’re hiring six global fellows. Some basic details:

We’re on the hunt for six seriously stellar young people from around the globe to make up our first class of AJ+ Fellows.

It’s a one-year gig, it’s paid, and it’s an opportunity unlike anything else, an opportunity to be at the heart of the next generation of storytellers. Throughout the year, you’ll work with and learn from our core AJ+ team. You’ll join us in our adventure as we introduce AJ+ to the world, and you’ll be a valuable part of making sure this introduction unfolds with fireworks.

The fellowship begins with a 2-3 week stint in San Francisco before heading back to your home region.

Major Qualification: You “have to be downright obsessed with the news and trends in your region and — just as importantly — with the pursuit of unearthing untold stories.”

Deadline to Apply: August 1. Details and application here.

I am nervous as I write this. I am in my cold prison cell after my first official exercise session – four glorious hours in the grass yard behind our block and I don’t want that right to be snatched away.

I’ve been locked in my cell 24 hours a day for the past 10 days, allowed out only for visits to the prosecutor for questioning, so the chance for a walk in the weak winter sunshine is precious.

So too are the books on history, Arabic and fiction that my neighbors have passed to me, and the pad and pen I now write with.

I want to cling to these tiny joys and avoid anything that might move the prison authorities to punitively withdraw them. I want to protect them almost as much as I want my freedom back.

Peter Greste, A letter from Tora prison.

The News, via ABC (Australia):

Australian journalist Peter Greste will be detained in solitary confinement in Egypt for at least another 15 days.

Greste was arrested in Cairo in late December along with two [Al Jazeera] colleagues, bureau chief Mohamed Adel Fahmy and producer Baher Mohamed.

Egyptian authorities are accusing the crew of holding illegal meetings with members of the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been declared a terrorist group by the military-installed government.

However, the trio says it was merely reporting all sides of the story.

As Greste writes, “The three of us have been accused of collaborating with a terrorist organization [The Muslim Brotherhood], of hosting MB meetings in our hotel rooms, of using unlicensed equipments to deliberately broadcast false information to further their aims and defame and discredit the Egyptian state. The state has presented no evidence to support the allegations, and we have not been formally charged with any crime. But the prosecutor general has just extended our initial 15-day detention by another 15 days to give investigators more time to find something. He can do this indefinitely – one of my prison mates has been behind bars for 6 months without a single charge.”

Hassan El-Laithy, Egypt’s ambassador to Australia, says the detention isn’t personal. Instead, it’s aimed at Al Jazeera as a news organization. 

It has nothing to do with Peter Greste as a person, definitely,” El-Laithy told ABC. “But it is whether those working for a specific television station are abiding by the laws of that specific host country or not.”

Small solace, we imagine, for Greste and his colleagues.

Stepping Up: Al Jazeera Takes on US Cable News
After a series of fits and starts, Al Jazeera America launches today.
The network had tried to enter the US market over the years. When that didn’t work it bought Al Gore’s Current TV for $500 million to essentially get broadcast rights to 48 million homes. Consider that a cost to entry.
US media is skeptical about its possibility for success. “Al Jazeera America launches without significant advertiser base,” says the New York Post; “Al Jazeera America Will Have To Work Hard To Win Viewers,” says NPR; “Al Jazeera America faces more than the usual new-kid challenges,” chimes the Los Angeles Times; “Some Advertisers View Al Jazeera America as Too Risky: Conservative clients are balking,” warns AdWeek.
And all this is true, of course. The network entered American consciousness during the Iraq War. As US outlets focused on where missiles were launched from, Al Jazeera often spent time on where those missiles landed. Sadly, one of those missiles killed an Al Jazeera reporter.
At the time, US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld accused the network of “enflaming” Arab passions. “You could say it causes the loss of life,” he said of Al Jazeera. “It’s causing Iraqi people to be killed.”
And so, bogeyman. Terrorism. Al Jazeera.
This is the lens through which many Americans know it.
I started paying attention to the network around 2003/2004 as well. I was working in Saudi Arabia. I remember watching broadcasts of Osama Bin Laden. And these were important broadcasts that weren’t being shown on US television. This was, after all, the man who bombed the World Trade Center. You would think people would want to hear what he had to say. But hearing what he had to say was anti-American and Al Jazeera, by showing it, was anti-American by default.
Now, ten years later, Al Jazeera opens its New York offices. It begins broadcasting to America. I wish it the best of luck. Anyone who flipped to its online, live coverage of the Arab Spring knows how well they can do what they do.
And so, let’s watch them launch. They do so with some familiar faces. John Seigenthaler, former weekend anchor of NBC Nightly News, is on board. So too Joie Chen (CBS News and CNN) and Antonio Mora (Good Morning America). Ditto Soledad O’Brien.
And the network’s mission is less talk, more hard hitting news. As Brian Stelter kicks off his piece for the New York Times:

Fourteen hours of straight news every day. Hard-hitting documentaries. Correspondents in oft-overlooked corners of the country. And fewer commercials than any other news channel.
It sounds like something a journalism professor would imagine. In actuality, it is Al Jazeera America.

Can’t argue against that. We’ll be tuning in. — Michael
Related 01, circa 2009: Fred Kaplan, Why I Love Al Jazeera.
Related 02, circa today: Nikki Usher, Can Al Jazeera Win the Cable Wars?
The Schedule: That would be here.

Stepping Up: Al Jazeera Takes on US Cable News

After a series of fits and starts, Al Jazeera America launches today.

The network had tried to enter the US market over the years. When that didn’t work it bought Al Gore’s Current TV for $500 million to essentially get broadcast rights to 48 million homes. Consider that a cost to entry.

US media is skeptical about its possibility for success. “Al Jazeera America launches without significant advertiser base,” says the New York Post; “Al Jazeera America Will Have To Work Hard To Win Viewers,” says NPR; “Al Jazeera America faces more than the usual new-kid challenges,” chimes the Los Angeles Times; “Some Advertisers View Al Jazeera America as Too Risky: Conservative clients are balking,” warns AdWeek.

And all this is true, of course. The network entered American consciousness during the Iraq War. As US outlets focused on where missiles were launched from, Al Jazeera often spent time on where those missiles landed. Sadly, one of those missiles killed an Al Jazeera reporter.

At the time, US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld accused the network of “enflaming” Arab passions. “You could say it causes the loss of life,” he said of Al Jazeera. “It’s causing Iraqi people to be killed.”

And so, bogeyman. Terrorism. Al Jazeera.

This is the lens through which many Americans know it.

I started paying attention to the network around 2003/2004 as well. I was working in Saudi Arabia. I remember watching broadcasts of Osama Bin Laden. And these were important broadcasts that weren’t being shown on US television. This was, after all, the man who bombed the World Trade Center. You would think people would want to hear what he had to say. But hearing what he had to say was anti-American and Al Jazeera, by showing it, was anti-American by default.

Now, ten years later, Al Jazeera opens its New York offices. It begins broadcasting to America. I wish it the best of luck. Anyone who flipped to its online, live coverage of the Arab Spring knows how well they can do what they do.

And so, let’s watch them launch. They do so with some familiar faces. John Seigenthaler, former weekend anchor of NBC Nightly News, is on board. So too Joie Chen (CBS News and CNN) and Antonio Mora (Good Morning America). Ditto Soledad O’Brien.

And the network’s mission is less talk, more hard hitting news. As Brian Stelter kicks off his piece for the New York Times:

Fourteen hours of straight news every day. Hard-hitting documentaries. Correspondents in oft-overlooked corners of the country. And fewer commercials than any other news channel.

It sounds like something a journalism professor would imagine. In actuality, it is Al Jazeera America.

Can’t argue against that. We’ll be tuning in. — Michael

Related 01, circa 2009: Fred Kaplan, Why I Love Al Jazeera.

Related 02, circa today: Nikki Usher, Can Al Jazeera Win the Cable Wars?

The Schedule: That would be here.

shortformblog:

ericmortensen:


newsflick:



Shouldn’t it read, “Hey! We just bought Current TV”? Odd how networks break news about themselves, so take it from the Guardian. 



Current TV is done. Al Jazeera is simply buying Current’s access to US cable operators. Al Gore will remain as an advisor to the new network. That should shake things up in the cable news scene. 


Question for you guys: Does the fact that Time Warner Cable is dropping Current TV in the wake of this news signify any sort of unsavory motives on their part? It struck me as not a business decision (though that’s what they say, of course), but one critical of what Al Jazeera represents. The fact that the blackout took effect almost immediately after the deal was signed seems like a clear indicator of someone being really pissed that the deal happened at all.

shortformblog:

ericmortensen:

newsflick:

Shouldn’t it read, “Hey! We just bought Current TV”? Odd how networks break news about themselves, so take it from the Guardian

Current TV is done. Al Jazeera is simply buying Current’s access to US cable operators. Al Gore will remain as an advisor to the new network. That should shake things up in the cable news scene. 

Question for you guys: Does the fact that Time Warner Cable is dropping Current TV in the wake of this news signify any sort of unsavory motives on their part? It struck me as not a business decision (though that’s what they say, of course), but one critical of what Al Jazeera represents. The fact that the blackout took effect almost immediately after the deal was signed seems like a clear indicator of someone being really pissed that the deal happened at all.

(Source: newsflick)

Al Jazeera website hacked by Syria's Assad loyalists →

Via Reuters:

The website of Qatar-based satellite news network Al Jazeera was apparently hacked on Tuesday by Syrian government loyalists for what they said was the television channel’s support for the “armed terrorist groups and spreading lies and fabricated news”.

A Syrian flag and statement denouncing Al Jazeera’s “positions against the Syrian people and government” were posted on the Arabic site of the channel in response to its coverage of the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad which began in March last year.

Al Jazeera English Closes Chinese Bureau After Reporter is Expelled →

Via the BBC:

Al-Jazeera says it has been forced to close its English-language bureau in Beijing after its reporter was expelled.

China’s decision not to renew the press credentials and visa of Melissa Chan is the first such action against a foreign reporter for many years.

Officials have also refused to allow a replacement for Ms Chan, al-Jazeera’s China correspondent since 2007.

China’s foreign ministry refused to say why the reporter had been expelled.

"We stress that everybody must abide by Chinese laws and regulations and must abide by their professional ethics," spokesman Hong Lei said, responding to repeated questions.

Al-Jazeera said it would “continue to request a presence in China”.

The channel expressed its disappointment in a statement, adding that it had been requesting additional visas for correspondents for ”quite some time”. The move does not affect its Arabic-language service.

The move will be viewed as an attempt by the Chinese authorities to intimidate foreign media operating in the country, says the BBC’s Martin Patience in Beijing.

Training Citizen Journalists
Thanks to the internet, pretty much anyone can practice journalism. We’ve been exploring how to deal with the information overload, and how to evaluate journalism that’s not necessarily produced by a traditional newsroom. Some argue that journalism born from Twitter monitoring is not real journalism. But it seems here to stay. 
via Gigaom:

This democratization of distribution has had a profound effect on the coverage of uprisings in Egypt and Libya and more recently in Syria. Because of YouTube, Twitter, and other networks, more information is available about what is happening in those countries. But is it reliable? According to some reports, the news coming from Syria has been altered by activists who are trying to make a specific point. Does that mean citizen journalism is flawed? Not really. It just means we need better tools to make sense of the flood of news all around us.

How can we improve online citizen journalism? Al Jazeera has an answer: by teaching tools. It has just launched an educational campaign aiming to “raise a new generation of citizen journalists.” 
via The Realtime Report:

Facebook and Twitter will enable these journalists to update the world about news in their area — and Al Jazeera’s new YouTube channel, Al Jazeera Unplugged, will teach them how to use these social networks to share information. The first videos stick to the basics: how to use Twitter and Facebook.  The videos will gradually become more advanced as the campaign continues, with an increased focus on producing and sharing content.
Riyaad Minty, Al Jazeera’s head of social media, told GigaOm that “The focus is mostly on how these tools can be used to create greater awareness around issues within your society. That’s where the name unplugged comes from – it’s more about a need to disconnect, go out and create content – not just consuming media.”

FJP: Subscribed to the channel and looking forward to more videos.

Training Citizen Journalists


Thanks to the internet, pretty much anyone can practice journalism. We’ve been exploring how to deal with the information overload, and how to evaluate journalism that’s not necessarily produced by a traditional newsroom. Some argue that journalism born from Twitter monitoring is not real journalism. But it seems here to stay. 

via Gigaom:

This democratization of distribution has had a profound effect on the coverage of uprisings in Egypt and Libya and more recently in Syria. Because of YouTube, Twitter, and other networks, more information is available about what is happening in those countries. But is it reliable? According to some reports, the news coming from Syria has been altered by activists who are trying to make a specific point. Does that mean citizen journalism is flawed? Not really. It just means we need better tools to make sense of the flood of news all around us.

How can we improve online citizen journalism? Al Jazeera has an answer: by teaching tools. It has just launched an educational campaign aiming to “raise a new generation of citizen journalists.” 

via The Realtime Report:

Facebook and Twitter will enable these journalists to update the world about news in their area — and Al Jazeera’s new YouTube channel, Al Jazeera Unplugged, will teach them how to use these social networks to share information. The first videos stick to the basics: how to use Twitter and Facebook.  The videos will gradually become more advanced as the campaign continues, with an increased focus on producing and sharing content.

Riyaad Minty, Al Jazeera’s head of social media, told GigaOm that “The focus is mostly on how these tools can be used to create greater awareness around issues within your society. That’s where the name unplugged comes from – it’s more about a need to disconnect, go out and create content – not just consuming media.”

FJP: Subscribed to the channel and looking forward to more videos.

Al Jazeera Will Not Air French Murder Video →

Good case study for a journalism ethics class.

Via Al Jazeera:

Al Jazeera has said it will not air a video that it received showing three shooting attacks in Toulouse and Montauban in southern France this month.

The network on Tuesday said the video did not add any information that was not already in public domain. It also did not meet the television station’s code of ethics for broadcast.

The video shows the attacks in chronological order, with audible gunshots and voices of the killer and the victims. But it does not show the face of the confessed murderer, Mohammed Merah, and it does not contain a statement from him…

…Merah boasted of filming his killings and witnesses told police that he appeared to be wearing a video camera in a chest harness.

…Zied Tarrouche, Al Jazeera’s Paris bureau chief, said the images were a bit shaky but of a high technical quality. He also said the video had clearly been manipulated after the fact, with religious songs and recitations of Quranic verses laid over the footage.

Syria: Songs of Defiance

Al Jazeera will begin airing a documentary on the Syria uprising that was shot entirely on an iPhone. According to the network, Al Jazeera cameras are banned in Syria and their correspondent went undercover to meet “resistance fighters, protesters, Syrian army deserters, footballers-turned-revolutionaries and cigarette smugglers who have joined the fight.”

Journalism.co.uk adds the following from an Al Jazeera press release:

I can’t tell you my name. I’ve spent many months secretly in Syria for Al Jazeera.

I cannot show my face and my voice is disguised to conceal my identity, because I don’t want to endanger my contacts in Syria.

Because carrying a camera would be risky, I took my cell phone with me as I moved around the country and captured images from the uprising that have so far remained unseen.

Songs of Defiance begins airing this Wednesday and will run through next week. Al Jazeera has posted its schedule here.

We heard horrific stories of American female journalists being attacked during the Egyptian revolution in 2011. There are many other cases we did not hear about because the victims are not Western. They don’t have the same access and publicity; they may not be as comfortable talking openly about an issue that’s considered private and sensitive in some cultures, or they may worry that any frank discussion could portray them as weak and incapable of braving the dangers of field journalism.

— Zeina Awad, writing about the issues faced by female journalists and encouraging dialogue on the subject. Read the full piece from Al Jazeera.

I couldn’t work for another newspaper. I can only work for a paper where I can write objectively. I can’t write that in the last 20 years, it’s all been so wonderful in our country because I know it’s not true. Saying everything’s just great. Kissing officials’ backsides. I won’t do that, not so I can earn $500 or $600 a month. I’d rather earn less but tell the truth.

Journalist Zhanara Kasymbekova in The Fight to Publish, a film about Kazakhstan’s only mass-produced opposition paper.

(via Al Jazeera)

After Kazakhstan gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, a system of double standards was created. To the outside world, the language of democracy is used to attract foreign investors. On the inside, journalists must navigate the dangerous realities of imprisonment, fines, interrogations by secret police, and raids of editorial offices. In two decades of independence, not a single murdered journalist’s case has been solved. Ostrovsky’s film follows journalist Zhanara, Staff reporter as the Golos Respubliki newspaper, as she covers stories from her base in Almaty - and when breaking news of the riots in Zhanaozen takes her to the aftermath of the bloodiest day in Kazakhstan’s modern history.

She writes:

The Respublika newspaper did not come out of this frightening period unscathed. The editorial staff were threatened when the beheaded corpse of a dog was hung outside the newspaper’s window. It turned out that this was only a prelude to the arson of our editorial office, which was burned to the ground. At the same time, our editor-in-chief, Irina Petrushova, was charged with tax evasion and forced to flee the country. By 2009, the newspaper had been forced to shut down by one of its creditors, the government-controlled BTA bank. But despite all the pressure, the newspaper reopened under the new name it uses today: Golos Respubliki.

FJP: A wake-up call to the realities faced by journalists around the world. Zhanara has to fight to cover news objectively, risking her life in the process.

Watch the film. 25 minutes, worth it.