posts about or somewhat related to ‘Anderson Cooper’

Since my early days as a reporter, I have worked hard to accurately and fairly portray gay and lesbian people in the media - and to fairly and accurately portray those who for whatever reason disapprove of them. It is not part of my job to push an agenda, but rather to be relentlessly honest in everything I see, say and do. I’ve never wanted to be any kind of reporter other than a good one, and I do not desire to promote any cause other than the truth.

Anderson Cooper, in an e-mail to Andrew Sullivan, on being gay. 

Cooper discusses negotiating privacy as a reporter. It’s certainly worth a read:

I’ve always believed that who a reporter votes for, what religion they are, who they love, should not be something they have to discuss publicly. As long as a journalist shows fairness and honesty in his or her work, their private life shouldn’t matter. I’ve stuck to those principles for my entire professional career, even when I’ve been directly asked “the gay question,” which happens occasionally. I did not address my sexual orientation in the memoir I wrote several years ago because it was a book focused on war, disasters, loss and survival. I didn’t set out to write about other aspects of my life.

Recently, however, I’ve begun to consider whether the unintended outcomes of maintaining my privacy outweigh personal and professional principle. It’s become clear to me that by remaining silent on certain aspects of my personal life for so long, I have given some the mistaken impression that I am trying to hide something - something that makes me uncomfortable, ashamed or even afraid. This is distressing because it is simply not true.

I’ve also been reminded recently that while as a society we are moving toward greater inclusion and equality for all people, the tide of history only advances when people make themselves fully visible. There continue to be far too many incidences of bullying of young people, as well as discrimination and violence against people of all ages, based on their sexual orientation, and I believe there is value in making clear where I stand.

The fact is, I’m gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn’t be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud.

I have always been very open and honest about this part of my life with my friends, my family, and my colleagues. In a perfect world, I don’t think it’s anyone else’s business, but I do think there is value in standing up and being counted. I’m not an activist, but I am a human being and I don’t give that up by being a journalist.

FJP: Cooper’s “coming out” is already floating around the web as a catchy headline (which honestly peeves me a little bit). What deserves attention is the commitment to respect, honesty, and integrity that he demonstrates as a human being and a reporter. It makes the note a delight to read and humanizes the reporter. So for that, thank you, Anderson Cooper. We continue to love you. —Jihii

Shout out to an elegant, funny Tumblr blog
awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Anderson Cooper and Elmo

Shout out to an elegant, funny Tumblr blog

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Anderson Cooper and Elmo


CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta near the epicenter of earthquake that devastated Japan Mar. 11, 2011.

Propelled by revolution in the Middle East and radiation in Japan, television news coverage of foreign events this year is at the highest level since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 10 years ago, news executives in the United States say.


The foreign press corps is working in exceptionally dangerous conditions in countries like Japan, where members carry radiation monitors on assignment, and in Libya, where crews of journalists have been detained. “We’ve had a year’s worth of international breaking news, and we’re only halfway through March,” said Tony Maddox, the executive vice president and managing director at CNN International, where anchors spoke on Saturday of being “live on five continents.”
The coverage exposes just how much reporting of foreign news has changed in the past decade, through cuts at news outlets and through the contributions of the Internet and other new technologies. Fewer journalists covering foreign news work full time for American broadcast networks than once did, and those who remain have had to hopscotch from one hot spot to another this year, sometimes creating lags in coverage.

(Image: Getty for CNN via NY Times)

CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta near the epicenter of earthquake that devastated Japan Mar. 11, 2011.

Propelled by revolution in the Middle East and radiation in Japan, television news coverage of foreign events this year is at the highest level since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 10 years ago, news executives in the United States say.

The foreign press corps is working in exceptionally dangerous conditions in countries like Japan, where members carry radiation monitors on assignment, and in Libya, where crews of journalists have been detained. “We’ve had a year’s worth of international breaking news, and we’re only halfway through March,” said Tony Maddox, the executive vice president and managing director at CNN International, where anchors spoke on Saturday of being “live on five continents.”

The coverage exposes just how much reporting of foreign news has changed in the past decade, through cuts at news outlets and through the contributions of the Internet and other new technologies. Fewer journalists covering foreign news work full time for American broadcast networks than once did, and those who remain have had to hopscotch from one hot spot to another this year, sometimes creating lags in coverage.

(Image: Getty for CNN via NY Times)

Lies, Lies and Objective Journalism →

Last week, after returning to the States from covering Egypt’s revolution, Anderson Cooper called out Hosni Mubarak and other politicians for lying to the media about their response and options to the uprising.

Soon, American establishment media were criticizing Cooper for taking taking sides in the conflict and losing his journalistic objectivity.

As Salon’s Glenn Greenwald writes:

Over the weekend, The Los AngelesTimes James Rainey mocked CNN’s Anderson Cooper for repeatedly using the word “lie” to describe the factually false statements of Egyptian leaders.  Though Rainey ultimately concluded that “it’s hard to find fault with what Cooper had to say” — meaning that everything Cooper identified as a “lie” was, in fact, a “lie” — the bulk of Rainey’s column derided the CNN anchor for his statements… Rainey also suggested that the harsh denunciations of Mubarak’s false statements were merely part of “Cooper’s pronounced shift toward more opinion-making in recent months … trying to adopt the more commentary-heavy approach of [CNN’s] higher-rated competitors, Fox and MSNBC.”  To Rainey, when a journalist calls a government lie a “lie,” that’s veering into “commentary-heavy opinion-making” rather than objective journalism 

Rainey, as Greenwald notes, wasn’t the only figure with questions about Cooper’s objectivity. Media critic Howard Kurtz had this to say during a Q&A with Newsweek’s Christopher Dickey, “Now I think most journalists would agree with him, perhaps most Americans would agree with him. But should an anchor and correspondent be taking sides on this kind of story?”

Says Greenwald:

Rainey, Kurtz and Dickey all have this exactly backwards.  Identifying lies told by powerful political leaders — and describing them as such — is what good journalists do, by definition.  It’s the crux of adversarial journalism, of a “watchdog” press.  “Objectivity” does not require refraining from pointing out the falsity of government claims.  The opposite is true; objectivity requires that a journalist do exactly that:  treat factually false statements as false.  ”Objectivity” is breached not when a journalist calls a lie a “lie,” but when they refuse to do so, when they treat lies told by powerful political officials as though they’re viable, reasonable interpretations of subjective questions.  The very idea that a journalist is engaged in ”opinion-making” or is “taking sides” by calling a lie a “lie” is ludicrous; the only “side” such a journalist is taking is with facts, with the truth.   It’s when a journalist fails to identify a false statement as such that they are “taking sides” — they’re siding with those in power by deceitfully depicting their demonstrably false statements as something other than lies.

We couldn’t agree more, and recommend reading Greenwald’s full critique of the critique over at Salon.

On Nov. 4, Anderson Cooper did the country a favor. He expertly deconstructed on his CNN show the bogus rumor that President Obama’s trip to Asia would cost $200 million a day. This was an important “story.” It underscored just how far ahead of his time Mark Twain was when he said a century before the Internet, “A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.” But it also showed that there is an antidote to malicious journalism — and that’s good journalism.

— Thomas Friedman, New York Times.

(Source: The New York Times)