posts about or somewhat related to ‘Argentina’

Found in an Argentine Limousine
The NY Times Lens Blog features a series by Myriam Meloni, an Italian photographer, who, while recovering from an injury in Argentina, began spending a lot of time in taxis to attend physical therapy sessions. Over the course of things, she learned that her cabby also drove limos, and had interesting stories about what went on in them. So she chose a uniform angle and “transformed the limo’s back seat into a shoe-box theater, with her as an audience of one, witnessing a parade of scenes.” See the photos here.
One of the people she encountered was Leila, a 23-year-old woman working as a stripper, who—to Meloni’s shock—had sex with four men in the car.
Lens Blog:

“But what impressed me is that I saw the girl manage the situation so easily,” said Ms. Meloni, adding that, through it all, she thought the woman projected poise. But when the four men left and the vehicle drove along, she saw a complete change in the woman (Slide 6). And when the veneer of a passenger’s constructed image was pierced, the contrast with reality could be startling.
“When I saw her totally alone, when I started to see her face, how she looked, how young she was and I took this portrait, I had a special feeling with this woman,” Ms. Meloni said. “Her attitude was totally different. She was just acting.”

She later photographed and wrote about Leila’s life in the essay Important Things Are Said Softly, which is incredible. She writes (of Leila):

She has two children to support. I went into her daily life and I found a strong woman, careful with her context, stubborn, generous and in fact, quite romantic.
I also witnessed her loneliness and frustration. I was wondering how she feels every time she gets undressed in front of a stranger, and what she dreams of, when I hear her humming a romantic melody.

Photo: An inflatable doll, forgotten on the seat of the limo. By Myriam Melona via The NY Times.

Found in an Argentine Limousine

The NY Times Lens Blog features a series by Myriam Meloni, an Italian photographer, who, while recovering from an injury in Argentina, began spending a lot of time in taxis to attend physical therapy sessions. Over the course of things, she learned that her cabby also drove limos, and had interesting stories about what went on in them. So she chose a uniform angle and “transformed the limo’s back seat into a shoe-box theater, with her as an audience of one, witnessing a parade of scenes.” See the photos here.

One of the people she encountered was Leila, a 23-year-old woman working as a stripper, who—to Meloni’s shock—had sex with four men in the car.

Lens Blog:

“But what impressed me is that I saw the girl manage the situation so easily,” said Ms. Meloni, adding that, through it all, she thought the woman projected poise. But when the four men left and the vehicle drove along, she saw a complete change in the woman (Slide 6). And when the veneer of a passenger’s constructed image was pierced, the contrast with reality could be startling.

“When I saw her totally alone, when I started to see her face, how she looked, how young she was and I took this portrait, I had a special feeling with this woman,” Ms. Meloni said. “Her attitude was totally different. She was just acting.”

She later photographed and wrote about Leila’s life in the essay Important Things Are Said Softly, which is incredible. She writes (of Leila):

She has two children to support. I went into her daily life and I found a strong woman, careful with her context, stubborn, generous and in fact, quite romantic.

I also witnessed her loneliness and frustration. I was wondering how she feels every time she gets undressed in front of a stranger, and what she dreams of, when I hear her humming a romantic melody.

Photo: An inflatable doll, forgotten on the seat of the limo. By Myriam Melona via The NY Times.

Not Your Ordinary Bookstore

Argentina’s El Ateneo Grand Splendid opened as a theater in 1919, later became a cinema and is now a bookstore.

Images: El Ateneo Grand Splendid, via Atlas Obscura.

First Papal Tweet
Introducing Pope Francis, via @Pontifex.
CORRECTION: We’re too shorthanded in this title. It’s the first Papal tweet under Francis. @Pontifex was tweeting under Benedict but those posts were erased after he resigned.

First Papal Tweet

Introducing Pope Francis, via @Pontifex.

CORRECTION: We’re too shorthanded in this title. It’s the first Papal tweet under Francis. @Pontifex was tweeting under Benedict but those posts were erased after he resigned.

Argentina’s El Ateneo.. Bookshelf porn? 
fjp-latinamerica:

El Ateneo Grand Splendid in downtown Buenos Aires is a spectacular bookstore that retains all the glamour of its former life as a 1920s movie palace, with a original balconies, painted ceiling, ornate carvings and crimson stage curtains. More stunning pictures can be found here.

Image: El Ateneo, via the Chicago Public Library.


FJP: Bookshelf porn? Our favorite kind.

Argentina’s El Ateneo.. Bookshelf porn? 

fjp-latinamerica:

El Ateneo Grand Splendid in downtown Buenos Aires is a spectacular bookstore that retains all the glamour of its former life as a 1920s movie palace, with a original balconies, painted ceiling, ornate carvings and crimson stage curtains. More stunning pictures can be found here.

Image: El Ateneo, via the Chicago Public Library.

FJP: Bookshelf porn? Our favorite kind.

fjp-latinamerica:

La Nación gives Tableau a try
Argentinian newspaper La Nación has been experimenting with the Seattle-based Tableau software and the result is impeccable: a good-looking, interactive data-built map with a list of local transparency laws or applicable regulations. 
Internal insight, via Nación DATA blog:

This collaborative project consists of an interactive map about transparency and public information in Argentina. The final version includes different provisions, ordinances, laws and resolutions on transparency sorted by political jurisdiction.
It took many months to be finally finished. We have no doubt that this map will be useful not only for those who advocate a more transparent government, but also for journalists, code developers, and activists of all sorts.

Image: Partial screenshot of the Nación DATA blog, via LaNación.com

FJP Fun Fact: Pat Hanrahan, one of Tableau’s founders, was also a founding employee at Pixar. 

fjp-latinamerica:

La Nación gives Tableau a try

Argentinian newspaper La Nación has been experimenting with the Seattle-based Tableau software and the result is impeccable: a good-looking, interactive data-built map with a list of local transparency laws or applicable regulations. 

Internal insight, via Nación DATA blog:

This collaborative project consists of an interactive map about transparency and public information in Argentina. The final version includes different provisions, ordinances, laws and resolutions on transparency sorted by political jurisdiction.

It took many months to be finally finished. We have no doubt that this map will be useful not only for those who advocate a more transparent government, but also for journalists, code developers, and activists of all sorts.

Image: Partial screenshot of the Nación DATA blog, via LaNación.com

FJP Fun Fact: Pat Hanrahan, one of Tableau’s founders, was also a founding employee at Pixar. 

An alert photo editor noticed that the pattern on the dust repeated itself in an unlikely way and subsequent investigations revealed the visual fraud.

A freelance photographer for AP was caught manipulating sand granules in one of his photos of children playing soccer in Argentina. A memo was later sent out announcing that the photographer would no longer be associated with AP as their “reputation is paramount.”

Is this an example of technology as a double-edged sword? What does photo (or even content) manipulation say about credibility in an industry when credibility is the foundation?

H/T: Poynter