Posts tagged with ‘BBC’

The BBC Approves this Camera
Via the British Journal of Photography:

Canon has today announced that its Cinema EOS C300 camera “has met the standards the BBC requires from cameras tested to the EBU recommendation EBU R118.”
The approval allows both internal and external BBC production teams to use the EOS C300 “for the production of a variety of programmes to be broadcast on the BBC’s range of HD channels.”

In a separate article the BJP writes about the camera’s technical details and how it was created.

The BBC Approves this Camera

Via the British Journal of Photography:

Canon has today announced that its Cinema EOS C300 camera “has met the standards the BBC requires from cameras tested to the EBU recommendation EBU R118.”

The approval allows both internal and external BBC production teams to use the EOS C300 “for the production of a variety of programmes to be broadcast on the BBC’s range of HD channels.”

In a separate article the BJP writes about the camera’s technical details and how it was created.

BBC Attacked by Iran’s Cyber Army?

On March 1, parts of the BBC were unable to access e-mail and other internet services, possibly due to an attack caused by its systems being overwhelmed by a flood of external communication requests. 

Recent attempts were also made to disrupt the Persian Service’s London phone-lines through multiple automatic calls and to jam two BBC Satellite feeds into Iran. 

Though Director General Mark Thompson would not comment on the details of these attacks, he did write a blog post last month on interference and harassment of BBC Persian service by the Iranian authorities. 

via BBC News:

The revelations follow Reporters Without Borders "Enemies of the Internet" report which was released at the start of the week. 

The free-speech lobby group reported that Iran and some of the other countries on its register “censor internet access so effectively that they restrict their populations to local intranets that bear no resemblance to the world wide web.”

Iran’s Revolutionary Guard created a “cyber army” in 2010. Hundreds of net users have been arrested and some even sentenced to death.

The BBC is the world’s greatest broadcaster, but it isn’t perfect and it does sometimes get things wrong.

BBC Trust chairman Lord Patten.

So, to ensure amends are made more quickly and apologies are administered when appropriate, the BCC is launching a corrections and clarifications page online, and due to recruit a new chief complaints editor. BCC Trust has also outlined 7 new proposals to improve the efficiency of the complaints process, which are open for public assessment. 

via journalism.co.uk:

This comes as titles in the newspaper industry introduce such columns within their printed pages, as launched by the Daily Mail, the Mail on Sunday and the Metro last year. In evidence to the Leveson inquiry at the beginning of this year, editor of the Telegraph Tony Gallagher also said he “may need to consider” the introduction of a corrections column ”in due course”.

The proposals can be viewed here

Designing the News

While at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, Johnny Selman monitored the BBC and created a poster out of each day’s “most important” news. The result is BBCx360.

Via Imprint:

"The purpose of this project is to promote the awareness of global current events with the American public," Selman wrote in the introduction to his website. “‘American citizens know little about current events in general and even less about overseas events’ according to The Washington Post in 2006."

Shown here:

  • May 7, 2011 - Libya ‘scatters mines’ in Misrata
  • August 29, 2011 - Colombia’s long task to identify conflict victims
  • August 16, 2011 - Tibetan monk burns himself to death in China
  • April 23, 2011 - Syria protests: Security forces shoot at mourners
  • April 19, 2011 - India: Haryana widows battered to death

Visit BBCx360 to view this exceptional project.

BBC World Service To Run Ads On Some Websites And Radio Stations

From paidContent.org


The BBC Trust has approved plans to run advertising on a number of BBC World Service websites as well as in radio broadcasts for the first time in the corporation’s history.

BBC World Service has been given the green light to run ads on the Arabic, Russian and Spanish websites, which the trust says will put it “on a par with the BBC’s international-facing website BBC.com”.
The World Service, which has seen its budget slashed by £46m a year resulting in more than 600 job losses, has been asked by the government to generate £3m from commercial activities by 2013/2014….
Plans to launch advertising on BBC.com faced fierce criticism from some sectors of the media industry, nevertheless ads have been running on the website since late 2007.

BBC World Service To Run Ads On Some Websites And Radio Stations

From paidContent.org

The BBC Trust has approved plans to run advertising on a number of BBC World Service websites as well as in radio broadcasts for the first time in the corporation’s history.

BBC World Service has been given the green light to run ads on the Arabic, Russian and Spanish websites, which the trust says will put it “on a par with the BBC’s international-facing website BBC.com”.

The World Service, which has seen its budget slashed by £46m a year resulting in more than 600 job losses, has been asked by the government to generate £3m from commercial activities by 2013/2014….

Plans to launch advertising on BBC.com faced fierce criticism from some sectors of the media industry, nevertheless ads have been running on the website since late 2007.

Well, hello.
Image: A young golden snub-nosed monkey in China’s Qinling Mountains. Cyril Ruoso via the BBC.

Well, hello.

Image: A young golden snub-nosed monkey in China’s Qinling Mountains. Cyril Ruoso via the BBC.

How News Organizations Can Help Battle Internet Censorship

Internet censorship is growing throughout the world, according to a study conducted by the Canada Centre for global security studies and Citizen Lab, and the BBC.

"This problem of Internet control is becoming an issue for more than human rights concerns," Ronald Deibert, director of the Centre, tells the New York Times.  ”The fact is that you have dozens of countries not just filtering for porn, but political filtering and key events as well.”

Called Casting a Wider Net (PDF), the study focusses on China and Iran where the BBC has a pilot program to provide proxy services to citizens in an attempt to to get around censorship barriers.

Key takeaways from the report include understanding circumvention tools such as Web proxies as publishing tools or “channels” in and of themselves that help drive content to audiences; an understanding that blocking is unpredictable and often occurs when particular news breaks; and that different methods should be simultaneously deployed such as Web proxies, email newsletters and Twitter posts in order to reach core audiences.

Images: Web Proxy and Twitter logins, and replacement proxy logins circa July 2011 in China.

Report (PDF). 

The Guardian vs the BBC

The Guardian created a 3D interactive timeline of its coverage of the UK Riots. The BBC created an audio collage of voices talking about the UK Riots. Combine them, and you get something like this.

Guardian 3D Timeline | BBC Audio Collage.

Race, Riots and the News →

England’s National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) takes the BBC to task for a recent episode of its radio show World Have Your Say where the host asked call-in show listeners, “Is there a problem with young black men?”

This follows a recent Newsnight television program where historian David Starkey claimed “whites have become blacks” when discussing England’s riots.

In an open letter, Gregory H. Lee, Jr, the NABJ President, writes:

Even more disturbing, the Newsnight presenter did not challenge that bizarre assertion - on a program that regularly holds people accountable for their views. By allowing the comment to go unchallenged, was the BBC agreeing with the inference that becoming black is monolithically synonymous with being violent?…

Is this just a case of shocking incompetence or racism — as others have said? Why have black people in Britain not been afforded the same respect given to others? Why is the assumption that if something is negative pertaining to black people it is deemed acceptable by the BBC? What happened to the BBC’s duty to provide accurate and balanced reporting? This raises the question of whether the BBC’s senior editorial ranks need better racial and philosophical diversity to avoid being blind to such insensitive incidents.

Whether an employer claims ownership of a social media account or not, they cannot ‘own’ the relationship between users and that account. And there will be as many relationships as users. Some passive; some collaborative; some neglected; some exploitative.

— Before the Age of Social Media, a journalist’s belongings consisted of a pen, paper, and maybe her roladex. Today, the accounts from which they tweet and post are becoming valuable assets, too.

In the Online Journalism Blog the occurrence of Laura Kusenssberg and her withdrawal from BBC for ITV is referenced to exemplify why this matters in a real world application. The underlying question here is ‘do journalists have ownership of the brand they create or is the organization they are associated with have rights to the users?’

You shouldn’t state your political preferences or say anything that compromises your impartiality. Don’t sound off about things in an openly partisan way. Don’t be seduced by the informality of social media into bringing the BBC into disrepute. Don’t criticise your colleagues. Don’t reveal confidential BBC information. Don’t surreptitiously sanitise Wikipedia pages about the BBC.

— The BBC releases its in-house social media guidelines for journalists (PDF).

Who Owns a Journalists' Twitter Account? →

Reportr has a head scratcher about BBC News political correspondent Laura Kuenssberg and her Twitter account.

Under her @BBCLauraK handle she’d built up a following of almost 60,000 people. Now that she’s moving on to ITVNews the question is does she need to give it up?

The simple thing would be to change the handle to @ITVLauraK but life isn’t always so simple. Instead, she’s starting from scratch.

Via Reportr:

Social media creates an opportunity for journalists to interact on a personal level with audiences.

Even if an account is branded as a “BBC” journalist, it blurs the traditional barrier between the professional and personal as tweets tend to reflect the personality of the reporter.

It marks a further step in the shift from the institutional to the individual brand of the journalist, identified by the State of the Media report in 2009: “Through search, e-mail, blogs, social media and more, consumers are gravitating to the work of individual writers and voices, and away somewhat from institutional brand.”

On the one hand, having BBC attached to your name will get you more attention. On the other, having LauraK attached to its brand gets the BBC added attention.

Something to think about if you slap your organization’s call letters before your name.

A man walks through the rubble of the Libyan city of Misrata.
BBC News - Day in Pictures.

A man walks through the rubble of the Libyan city of Misrata.

BBC News - Day in Pictures.

Innovative Move? BBC Develops iPhone App for Field Reporters
The BBC is in the process of creating a new app that would allow its reporters in the field to file photos, audio and video from an iPhone or iPad directly into the news organization’s system. The app would also allow reporters to broadcast live from an iPhone using only a 3G signal, Journalism.co.uk reported earlier today. But is this an innovative move?
Original article by Journalism.co.uk and picture from Media Bistro

Innovative Move? BBC Develops iPhone App for Field Reporters

The BBC is in the process of creating a new app that would allow its reporters in the field to file photos, audio and video from an iPhone or iPad directly into the news organization’s system. The app would also allow reporters to broadcast live from an iPhone using only a 3G signal, Journalism.co.uk reported earlier today. But is this an innovative move?

Original article by Journalism.co.uk and picture from Media Bistro