posts about or somewhat related to ‘Berkeley’

Mobile Reporting Field Guide
Students at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism have put together a great field guide for mobile reporting.
Available as a PDF or iBook, the guide walks through and evaluates a number of audio, video and photography apps.
Via the Guide:

During the Spring semester of 2012 a small group of students at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism enrolled in an eight week mobile reporting course to experiment to see how far they can go only using their wits, drive and the smartphone in their pocket…
…A lot of attention in the news industry has been given recently to the idea of using mobile devices for reporting. This class decided to serve as a case study on how well these devices, apps and third-party accessories work in the creation of multimedia. We attempted find all the accessories that had potential to aid a mobile journalist in the field, then we bought them all…
…This field guide is the result of the hard work of students, Casey Capachi, Matt Sarnecki and Evan Wagstaff.
Each item is presented with a brief review, followed by Pros, Cons and a final rating. Where appropriate we also included sample videos, images and audio so you could judge for yourself.

Multimedia Shooter, Mobile Reporting Field Guide.

Mobile Reporting Field Guide

Students at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism have put together a great field guide for mobile reporting.

Available as a PDF or iBook, the guide walks through and evaluates a number of audio, video and photography apps.

Via the Guide:

During the Spring semester of 2012 a small group of students at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism enrolled in an eight week mobile reporting course to experiment to see how far they can go only using their wits, drive and the smartphone in their pocket…

…A lot of attention in the news industry has been given recently to the idea of using mobile devices for reporting. This class decided to serve as a case study on how well these devices, apps and third-party accessories work in the creation of multimedia. We attempted find all the accessories that had potential to aid a mobile journalist in the field, then we bought them all…

…This field guide is the result of the hard work of students, Casey Capachi, Matt Sarnecki and Evan Wagstaff.

Each item is presented with a brief review, followed by Pros, Cons and a final rating. Where appropriate we also included sample videos, images and audio so you could judge for yourself.

Multimedia Shooter, Mobile Reporting Field Guide.

Food labels are a tricky lot and often leave people confused.
When asked what’s wrong with them, Good Calories Bad Calories author Gary Taubes responds, “Many things. Short answer is it’s too small and too hard to read. Second, it focuses on the wrong information. The fat and sodium content of the foods are not nearly as important as the sugar and digestible carbohydrate content, at least by my research on the subject. So giving fat, total fat, sodium, etc., is misdirecting attention away from the factors that actually cause weight gain, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, heart disease, etc.” 
What to do? Have a design challenge.
Which is exactly what the Berkley Journalism School did when it issued a call to designers to see who could best re-imagine how labels should be done.
Via Berkley:

Rethink the Food Label is a project by the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism’s News21 program and Good Magazine. We asked the public, food thinkers, nutritionists, and designers to redesign the Nutrition Facts Label to make it easier to read and more useful to people who want to consume healthier, more nutritious and wholesome food.
Designs could incorporate the nutrition label’s existing break down of fats, sugars, vitamins, calorie counts and percent daily values. Or, they could re-imagine the label to include geography, food quality, food justice, carbon footprint, or lesser-known chemosensory characteristics.

Click through to meet the winners.

Food labels are a tricky lot and often leave people confused.

When asked what’s wrong with them, Good Calories Bad Calories author Gary Taubes responds, “Many things. Short answer is it’s too small and too hard to read. Second, it focuses on the wrong information. The fat and sodium content of the foods are not nearly as important as the sugar and digestible carbohydrate content, at least by my research on the subject. So giving fat, total fat, sodium, etc., is misdirecting attention away from the factors that actually cause weight gain, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, heart disease, etc.” 

What to do? Have a design challenge.

Which is exactly what the Berkley Journalism School did when it issued a call to designers to see who could best re-imagine how labels should be done.

Via Berkley:

Rethink the Food Label is a project by the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism’s News21 program and Good Magazine. We asked the public, food thinkers, nutritionists, and designers to redesign the Nutrition Facts Label to make it easier to read and more useful to people who want to consume healthier, more nutritious and wholesome food.

Designs could incorporate the nutrition label’s existing break down of fats, sugars, vitamins, calorie counts and percent daily values. Or, they could re-imagine the label to include geography, food quality, food justice, carbon footprint, or lesser-known chemosensory characteristics.

Click through to meet the winners.