posts about or somewhat related to ‘Blogs’

Sometime in the past few years, the blog died. In 2014, people will finally notice. Sure, blogs still exist, many of them are excellent, and they will go on existing and being excellent for many years to come. But the function of the blog, the nebulous informational task we all agreed the blog was fulfilling for the past decade, is increasingly being handled by a growing number of disparate media forms that are blog-like but also decidedly not blogs.

Instead of blogging, people are posting to Tumblr, tweeting, pinning things to their board, posting to Reddit, Snapchatting, updating Facebook statuses, Instagramming, and publishing on Medium. In 1997, wired teens created online diaries, and in 2004 the blog was king. Today, teens are about as likely to start a blog (over Instagramming or Snapchatting) as they are to buy a music CD. Blogs are for 40-somethings with kids.

Jason Kottke, Nieman Journalism Lab. The blog is dead, long live the blog.

Jason’s article is part of a series of Nieman predictions for journalism in 2014.

The Evolution of Slate

Digiday explores Slate’s early days and the transition to being owned by the Washington Post.

In Internet years, Slate is a gray beard. It debuted in 1996, backed by Microsoft. It was at the forefront of many now-common Web trends. It was ahead of the curation curve with “Today’s Papers” and even experimented with a subscription model in the late 1990s (subscribers got a Slate umbrella). It proved that Web-only publications could produce serious, high-quality journalism….

In its first iteration, Slate described itself as an online magazine, published once a week and with page numbers. But it began experimentation with new online storytelling vehicles. You could argue that “In Other Magazines,” which debuted in June 1996, was an early forerunner to the type of aggregation that built blogs.

“I’d do it on Sunday,” Plotz said. “I’d get Time and Newsweek to have them fax the issue, and I’d write about what was in these magazines and update during the week.”

But then a curious thing happened. Princess Diana died in 1997 and changed the course of the outlet. Slate, with a down week, missed what was arguably the first big Web-culture story. What’s more, its rival Salon was all over the news.

“We were dry, and we realized we don’t understand the medium,” Plotz said. “We can’t walk away and have a site that functions and is relevant to the conversation.”

The outlet did a 180, changing from a once-a-week publishing schedule to a daily, then twice daily schedule. It launched blogs, such as Mickey Kaus’ Kausfiles and developed some stellar podcasts like the “Culture Gabfest,” which is still successful today.

Blogging with Sherpas: iPad apps in the Himalayas
National Geographic has long been known for sponsoring “expeditions” and those sorts of wild, dangerous pastimes that only seem to exist in books anymore, or at least so far away from us normal people that we hardly believe they still go on. But they do, and here’s proof:

Maggie, it’s Mark Jenkins calling from Camp One. A couple of team members are getting back down to Base Camp. Some of them are up at Camp Two.
But make sure your message machine can hold about a 10-minute or 20-minute message ’cause that’s what I’m gonna give you tomorrow sometime. For a blog about what it feels like to go through the Khumbu Icefall, which is one of the most dangerous aspects of climbing Everest on this side, the South Col. All’s well. All right, good luck Maggie, things are good here. Bye-bye.

Last week, a large team of mountaineers began to climb Mount Everest, and they took their computers with them. They’ll follow a historic climbing route, first taken about 49 years ago, but they’ll blog everyday they’re up there. Chief posters among them, it seems, are writer Mark Jenkins and photographer Cory Richards.
Richards has blogged in on top of mountains before.
Download the iPad app here if you’re interested, because the website is very good at teasing us computer-only folks.

Blogging with Sherpas: iPad apps in the Himalayas

National Geographic has long been known for sponsoring “expeditions” and those sorts of wild, dangerous pastimes that only seem to exist in books anymore, or at least so far away from us normal people that we hardly believe they still go on. But they do, and here’s proof:

Maggie, it’s Mark Jenkins calling from Camp One. A couple of team members are getting back down to Base Camp. Some of them are up at Camp Two.

But make sure your message machine can hold about a 10-minute or 20-minute message ’cause that’s what I’m gonna give you tomorrow sometime. For a blog about what it feels like to go through the Khumbu Icefall, which is one of the most dangerous aspects of climbing Everest on this side, the South Col. All’s well. All right, good luck Maggie, things are good here. Bye-bye.

Last week, a large team of mountaineers began to climb Mount Everest, and they took their computers with them. They’ll follow a historic climbing route, first taken about 49 years ago, but they’ll blog everyday they’re up there. Chief posters among them, it seems, are writer Mark Jenkins and photographer Cory Richards.

Richards has blogged in on top of mountains before.

Download the iPad app here if you’re interested, because the website is very good at teasing us computer-only folks.

inothernews, Jan. 2008, page 4686 kateoplis, Aug. 2008, page 758 soupsoup, Oct. 2007, page 3063 brooklynmutt, Jan. 2008, page 1976 pantslessprogressive, Oct. 2008, pg. 939 newsflick, Jan. 2010, page 146 thepoliticalnotebook, Aug. 2010, pg. 204 mohandasgandhi, July 2009, page 608 azspot, January 2007, page 1920 shortformblog, Jan. 2009, WordPress

shortformblog:

Famous first words: How these great Tumblrs got their start

Everyone starts somewhere. So, where did these bloggers start? You know, the really great ones that have such great content on Tumblr? Just for kicks, we did a little bit of investigating, and came up with this cool little bit of navel-gazing into the past of some of our favorite bloggers ever. In order, top to bottom: inothernews, kateoplis, soupsoup, brooklynmutt, pantslessprogressive, newsflick, thepoliticalnotebookmohandasgandhi, azspot (who is like a pioneer or something) and … us. What did your first post say? Find it and link to it in a reblog.

FJP: Our very first post, from November 9, 2010. Still feels like a first kiss.

Blog Breakdown.
Evidently, they’re not on Tumblr.

Blog Breakdown.

Evidently, they’re not on Tumblr.

soupsoup:

A great interview with Jack Shafer on Reliable Sources about media criticism and having strong journalistic standards.

FJP: His comments about state government sunshine acts are dead on (around 8:00).

I was just offered money to post an infographic. Seriously, people. It’s a BLOG. Let’s keep some perspective, shall we? Put that money towards hiring a graphic designer or statistician. If you have a product you want promoted, buy an ad.

Dustin Smith, Chart Porn, A Bribe?.

FJP: Nicely done, and a good example for the ethics section of Blogging 101.

John Battelle: I heard blogs are dead.

Matt Mullenweg: I heard that too, on a blog.

A conversation about blogs as the Independent Web, with some time spent on how Tumblr fits into the equation.

Mullenweg is the founder and creator of WordPress, which between WordPress.com and WordPress.org is the most used blogging platform/Content Management System on the Web.

Batelle is the founder of Federated Media, an advertising network focussed on providing solutions to independent media.

Run Time: 18 minutes with 12 minutes of Q&A.

Variety Sort of Tries to Come Out From Behind the Paywall

Variety, the entertainment news and business magazine, released a new blog called ShowBlitz with the accompanying email:

We realize that our paywall has discouraged sites like yours from linking to our content in the past, even when Variety breaks big showbiz stories. Showblitz gives you that way let your users have access to an important source of news — and it also gives you an easy way to monitor a feed of Variety’s exclusives and breaking news.

It appears Variety recognizes that its paywall locks it out from the conversation ecosystem surrounding entertainment news but here’s the rub:

This is not a strategy shift for Variety.com. The paywall lives on. Each entry on Showblitz – short, timely, punchy and art-centric – will include links to the full stories within Variety.com.

A typical ShowBlitz post is a photo and paragraph summary the news that looks more or less like this:

typical showblitz post

The expectation, or hope, really, is that readers will click that big “Read Full Story” link and head over to the Variety site.

And readers might. But after reading “two articles, columns, photos or videos per month,” they’ll get hit with this screenblock: 

variety paywall

So, two questions: the move is obviously a subscription play that markets Variety content to would-be subscribers. But will readers even bother to click through knowing they’ll be hit with a pay now plea?

And with such skimpy content offerings, basically a vanilla summary of the news, what motivates other publications, bloggers and social network posters to actually share and link to it? Right now, they certainly can’t do anything of the sort from it. Think of it as the antisocial blog.

Will be interesting to see if and how this minimalist approach works. Somehow, I doubt it. — Michael

Adventures in Freelancing

In which our hero must find women who trade their children for luxury Hermes hand bags.

Writer: “Three years ago I would have gotten $4,000 for a story that took this much work.”

Editor: “That was the old media.”

Inside the Wild, Wacky, Profitable World of Boing Boing →

It’s eccentric. It’s unprofessional. And it makes money. How four people who do exactly what they want run one of the most popular blogs on the planet.

Via Fast Company:

“Boing Boing is a holdover from a time when the best blogs were written by smart people who posted whatever was interesting to them,” observes Jonah Peretti, founder of BuzzFeed. Sure, there are still many such blogs around, but the blogosphere overall has changed radically, with the dominant players falling into recognizable categories — tech (Gizmodo, Engadget), gossip (TMZ, Gawker), politics (the Huffington Post, Politico) — and generally created by teams of professionals looking for growth and profits. “The new generation of postpersonal blogs,” Peretti adds, “are much bigger.”