posts about or somewhat related to ‘DIY’

Jacqueline Suskin works on a poem, entitled, Jacqueline Suskin reads a poem she has written as she waits for customers at her Poem Store at the Hollywood Farmers Market. Jacqueline Suskin writes a poem for a customer at her

Made-to-order poetry in Los Angeles

latimes:

Jacqueline Suskin, a writer and former vegetable gardener, has taken to the Hollywood Farmers Market for her latest venture: The Poem Store.

Sitting with her typewriter, Suskin takes requests from curious passersby and regulars, taking requests for poems on back pain to making verse fit the title “Since Wednesday.”

As for the most popular request?

"Everyone is always asking for love poems," she says. "We are all obsessed with love."

But love, as a topic, is deeply unspecific. When someone asks her to write a poem about love, she responds by asking what kind of love. That usually leads to a story about a girlfriend living far

away, or a person new to Los Angeles desperately missing her family, or the love a mother has for her new baby.

She thinks people ask for poems that help them understand their path or direction in life.

"They want hope, or confidence, or they just need someone to see who they are," she says. "Half the time I feel like I am a therapist or a psychic."

Read more of reporter Deborah Netburn’s story in our latest Column One feature.

Photos: Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times

Anthony De Rosa: Learn by Doing

We’re all up-and-comers, in one way or another. And whether it’s as a reporter or a developer, those who want to be a part of the journalism industry from now on will need several (or in some cases, many) technology-based skills.

In this video, Reuters’ Anthony De Rosa tells us some of his early professional history — how he got into coding as a side-job, which led him to learn a few Adobe programs. He learned by doing, which is the first important thing to remember. The second: he learned from others, through networking and informal mentorships.

Increasingly, you’ll grow your professional skill set with the help of friends and through colleagues, not institutional processes. You won’t necessarily be assigned or told what you’ll need to know. Follow your interests, and reach out to those who are a few steps ahead. They’ll help you, and you’ll help them.

The best part? All the time you spent playing in Photoshop may look good on your CV.

See our other video with Anthony here, and check back for another later this week.

Sometimes You Just Really Need a Burrito
Well, I do. And so I was terribly excited when I first saw this on GOOD:

Have you ever dreamed of a warm, tortilla-wrapped bundle of joy after a long night out or on a bleary-eyed morning, only to find your favorite taco shop closed? Maybe you just have an unhealthy addiction to these penny-saving, bean, meat, cheese, oranything-filled savory and cylindrical meals that will fill you up pronto. 
If you can relate, you’re in for a treat. The customizable, 3-D Burritob0t prototype will print your dream burrito ingredients straight onto a tortilla. The invention is the work of interactive designer Marko Manriquez, who created the project while studying at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program and he hopes to bring it to life with a Kickstarter campaign.
Manriquez calls his Burritob0t “Tex-Mex 3D Printing.” The b0t features disposable syringes to print ingredients including beans, rice, cheese, sour cream, corn, guacamole, and of course salsa picante. As long as it’s in paste form, any ingredient can be attached to the printer. 
The machine is connected with a smartphone app, which offers the burrito-lover flexibility in controlling the meal. The user selects the level of each ingredient according to a numbered scale. The app enables Manriquez to track user taste preferences in a database and visualize the data.
Curious to see the Burritob0t in action? Manriquez plans to hold a public demo this summer in New York City. He is also working on a 5-course meal exhibition: each course will be prepared (or printed) from the syringes of a different bot. 

FJP: The concept is completely genius and I have burrito cravings often enough to seriously appreciate a burrito-maker connected to my smartphone, which is connected to my brain, which is connected to my tummy, which causes my insatiable burrito cravings. On the other hand, syringes freak me out a little and I don’t know how I feel about my food coming out of them. But still, innovation & burritos. Two keys to a happy life.—Jihii

Sometimes You Just Really Need a Burrito

Well, I do. And so I was terribly excited when I first saw this on GOOD:

Have you ever dreamed of a warm, tortilla-wrapped bundle of joy after a long night out or on a bleary-eyed morning, only to find your favorite taco shop closed? Maybe you just have an unhealthy addiction to these penny-saving, bean, meat, cheese, oranything-filled savory and cylindrical meals that will fill you up pronto. 

If you can relate, you’re in for a treat. The customizable, 3-D Burritob0t prototype will print your dream burrito ingredients straight onto a tortilla. The invention is the work of interactive designer Marko Manriquez, who created the project while studying at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program and he hopes to bring it to life with a Kickstarter campaign.

Manriquez calls his Burritob0t “Tex-Mex 3D Printing.” The b0t features disposable syringes to print ingredients including beans, rice, cheese, sour cream, corn, guacamole, and of course salsa picante. As long as it’s in paste form, any ingredient can be attached to the printer. 

The machine is connected with a smartphone app, which offers the burrito-lover flexibility in controlling the meal. The user selects the level of each ingredient according to a numbered scale. The app enables Manriquez to track user taste preferences in a database and visualize the data.

Curious to see the Burritob0t in action? Manriquez plans to hold a public demo this summer in New York City. He is also working on a 5-course meal exhibition: each course will be prepared (or printed) from the syringes of a different bot. 

FJP: The concept is completely genius and I have burrito cravings often enough to seriously appreciate a burrito-maker connected to my smartphone, which is connected to my brain, which is connected to my tummy, which causes my insatiable burrito cravings. On the other hand, syringes freak me out a little and I don’t know how I feel about my food coming out of them. But still, innovation & burritos. Two keys to a happy life.—Jihii

100 Interviews →

Every person you see on the street, on the subway, at the doctor’s office — every person has a story.

In October 2010, I got to thinking, ‘How many of those stories do I really know? How many am I missing out on?’

So I sat down and made a list: 100 types of people I knew existed in the world but had never met. A transgendered person, someone who had been to prison, someone who had saved a life, a one-hit wonder, a psychic, someone from a third world country.

The project that was born is 100 INTERVIEWS (www.100interviews.com). 100 Interviews is a blog by NYC journalist and comedian Gaby Dunn, wherein she (who is me) attempts to interview 100 brand new people in just one year.

Since the project began, I have had coffee with my father and a recovering heroin addict, talked religion with a self-made millionaire, gotten drunk with an amputee, learned about fearlessness and lunacy from a Guinness World Record holder, discussed politics with a gay Republican, and tried to civilly understand someone who pickets abortion clinics.

FJP: Reading these is how I’ve been procrastinating (uh, enlightening myself) lately.  We like interviews, spontaneous projects and lists. Well done, Gaby. Click-through to see the complete list of 100.

The show went on sale at noon on Saturday, December 10th. 12 hours later, we had over 50,000 purchases and had earned $250,000, breaking even on the cost of production and website. As of Today, we’ve sold over 110,000 copies for a total of over $500,000. Minus some money for PayPal charges etc, I have a profit around $200,000 (after taxes $75.58). This is less than I would have been paid by a large company to simply perform the show and let them sell it to you, but they would have charged you about $20 for the video. They would have given you an encrypted and regionally restricted video of limited value, and they would have owned your private information for their own use. They would have withheld international availability indefinitely. This way, you only paid $5, you can use the video any way you want, and you can watch it in Dublin, whatever the city is in Belgium, or Dubai. I got paid nice, and I still own the video (as do you). You never have to join anything, and you never have to hear from us again.

I really hope people keep buying it a lot, so I can have shitloads of money, but at this point I think we can safely say that the experiment really worked.

— Louis CK with a sales report for his Live at the Beacon Theater show that he produced, directed and began selling for $5 off of his site this past weekend.

Some YouTubers Top $Million →

There’s moneh in them kittehs.

Via the NY Post:

Hundreds of YouTube stars are making more than six figures, and hundreds more are making more than $40,000 a year — roughly the median salary in the US. There are even stars who have topped a million dollars, although the company wouldn’t say how many.