Posts tagged with ‘Data Visualization’

theparisreview:

This series of infographics, illustrating how different parts of the country say different things, is fascinating. Below: mayonnaise.

FJP: Neat.

theparisreview:

This series of infographics, illustrating how different parts of the country say different things, is fascinating. Below: mayonnaise.

FJP: Neat.

Apply now! Opportunities for journalists and students →

onaissues:

We’ve pulled together a number of opportunites for journalists that have deadlines looming. Apply now for these grants, scholarships and training opportunities. 

Grants
The International Women’s Media Foundation will award three $20,000 grants to entrepreneurial women journalists to help them launch their own digital media start-ups. Deadline is Jan. 25, 2013. Apply here.

The Alexia Foundation, which supports photojournalists documenting humanitarian and social justice issues, is offering grants to students who produce still photos and multimedia projects and to professional photographers. Deadline is Jan. 18, 2013 for professionals and Feb. 1, 2013 for students.

J-Lab: The Institute for Interactive Journalism and the McCormick Foundation are accepting applications for the McCormick New Media Women Entrepreneurs award, which will provide four women-led media projects with $14,000 each. Applications are due by Jan. 23, 2013. Apply here.

Workshops and trainings
“Nobody was born a successful media titan. They developed a set of skills that allowed them to succeed.” The Maynard Media Academy at Nieman Foundation at Harvard University, which trains media entrepreneurial leadership and management, is accepting applicants for 2013. Participants attend two sessions, in January and March, 2013, to develop their business and leadership skills. Tuition is $3,5000 and applications are due by Dec. 31. Apply here.

Get an introduction to Infographics and Data Visualization with a free online course offered by the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas. The six-week course runs from Jan. 12 through Feb. 23, 2013. Sign up.

American Press Institute’s Transformation Tour is a series of workshops on digital skills for journalists. If you register in December, the cost is only $100 — that goes up to $200 in 2013. The next session, on Transformational Communities, will focus on connecting news organizations to their digital communities and increasing engagement. The session, led by Chuck Peters of the Gazette Co. and Jeff Sonderman of Poynter Institute, is Dec. 7 in Arlington, Va. Register here.

Opportunities for students
AP is now accepting applications for its global news internship program. AP will accept as many as 20 interns for summer 2013. The program, open to full-time students and recent college graduates, places interns throughout the U.S. and in Jerusalem, Johannesburg, London, Mexico City, Moscow, New Delhi, Rome, Sao Paulo, Seoul and Tokyo. Visit AP.org for information on how to apply.

Students can win a $5,000 scholarship by participating in Free to Tweet, a celebration of First Amendment rights funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and organized by 1 for All. High school and college students can participate through Dec. 15 by tweeting their support for their favorite First Amendment freedom with #FreetoTweet.

See more opportunities on journalists.org.

FJP: We often get messaged about where to look for such opportunities. These are great programs. Apply away.

If I think back to the first object that I consciously thought of as a piece of (information) design, two things come to mind: the narrative illustrations created by my father and the maps found in cartography books. There’s one specific book that I’ve kept around ever since. It’s the Schweizer Weltatlas, my geography book from 6th grade with an extensive appendix full of mesmerizing thematic maps that visualize ecological, political, and social data.

Benjamin Wiederkehr, managing director and founding member of Interactive Things, the Zurich based design studio, in a recent interview on the future of interactive visualizations.

There are a few things evolving side by side that will influence how visualizations will look a few years from now. First, although visualization has been a research topic for quite some time now, I still see new approaches being developed not only in academia but also by practitioners working in the industry. Second, the constantly improving computing power and the adoption of new technology allow for more complex, engaging, and connected visualizations to spread quickly over the web. Third, the vast amount of data being produced every day demands increasingly sophisticated tools for exploration, evaluation, and communication. To come by the increasing load of data, visualizations will need to scale in terms of performance, density, and interactivity.

FJP: Explore their work here. We’re long time fans.

Submap: Visualizing Locative and Time-Based Data on Distorted Maps.

via Kitchen Budapest:

Ebullition visualises and sonificates data pulled from one of the biggest news sites of Hungary, origo.hu. In the 30 fps animation, each frame represents a single day, each second covers a month, starting from December 1998 until October 2010.

Whenever a Hungarian city or village is mentioned in any domestic news on origo.hu website, it is translated into a force that dynamically distorts the map of Hungary. The sound follows the visual outcome, creating a generative ever changing drone.

Demographics of Social Media Users (infographic)

Demographics of Social Media Users (infographic)

nycdigital:

Using data released by the Office of Emergency Management, WNYC, The New York Times and NYC Oasis have made excellent interactive maps with Hurricane Evacuation Zones and Centers.

Wolfram Research has created a new file type, Computable Document Format document, which will make data manipulation simpler for novices and those who are unfamiliar with Flash, or don’t want to be bothered.
The purpose of the new CDF format is to quickly and easily turn nebulous data troves into elegant, interactive experiences 
From TheNextWeb:

On its blog, Wolfram demonstrates the format with an interactive ‘knowledge app’ about audio phenomenon The Doppler Effect. The app lets you play around with different parameters such as observer location and source frequency, to see how they effect to resultant sound. Rather than just reading about the effect or hearing an audio clip, you can actually manipulate it yourself based on actual scientific data.

While the CDF format promises to open the doors for thousands of would-be data visualizers, there is one significant hurdle to overcome; the CDF player download file is 150 megabytes, and consumes 500 mb of disk space once it has been installed.
For ‘citizen authors,’ though, it could be just the ticket for a fantastic voyage of data discovery. 

Wolfram Research has created a new file type, Computable Document Format document, which will make data manipulation simpler for novices and those who are unfamiliar with Flash, or don’t want to be bothered.

The purpose of the new CDF format is to quickly and easily turn nebulous data troves into elegant, interactive experiences 

From TheNextWeb:

On its blog, Wolfram demonstrates the format with an interactive ‘knowledge app’ about audio phenomenon The Doppler Effect. The app lets you play around with different parameters such as observer location and source frequency, to see how they effect to resultant sound. Rather than just reading about the effect or hearing an audio clip, you can actually manipulate it yourself based on actual scientific data.

While the CDF format promises to open the doors for thousands of would-be data visualizers, there is one significant hurdle to overcome; the CDF player download file is 150 megabytes, and consumes 500 mb of disk space once it has been installed.

For ‘citizen authors,’ though, it could be just the ticket for a fantastic voyage of data discovery. 

The storytelling power of infographics has hit hardtop with a new, customizable stencil set from artist Golan Levin. The sprayable, laser-cut setup allows users the combine thought-provoking text and an accompanying pie chart.
What they may lack as far as the intricacy and richness of computer-generated infographics, these stencils more than make up for it with the immediacy and intensity of graffiti art. 

The storytelling power of infographics has hit hardtop with a new, customizable stencil set from artist Golan Levin. The sprayable, laser-cut setup allows users the combine thought-provoking text and an accompanying pie chart.

What they may lack as far as the intricacy and richness of computer-generated infographics, these stencils more than make up for it with the immediacy and intensity of graffiti art. 

Hashtagify.me allows you to visually explore hashtags usage on Twitter

Hashtagify.me allows you to visually explore hashtags usage on Twitter

curiositycounts:

Inception told through folders. Pure gold.

Visual storytelling takes many forms. 

(via curiositycounts)

O’Reilly Radar editor Mac Slocum interviews Ben Fry, co-creator of the programming language Processing and head of Fathom Design, about data visualization.

The conversation touches on many subjects but this was a nice exchange on the democratization of the tools used to create data visualizations.

Q: A point that’s often raised…These tools put in in the hands of the wrong people will spreads misinformation. What’s your take on that?

A: I think it’s kind of funny… The same argument has been made with any technological leap since the beginning of time. Books printed in mass had a similar reaction. The internet came along and everybody could post things on the internet and wouldn’t that be the end of the world… The important thing is to focus on the literacy aspect of it. The more that people are doing the work—it all kind of goes to improve the conversation of what’s good, bad useful and what’s not.

Run Time: 8:00

Oil Spill amounts in perspective

(Source: flowingdata.com)


Every journalist needs to know about data. It is not just the preserve of the investigative journalist but can – and should – be used by reporters writing for local papers, magazines, the consumer and trade press and for online publications.

—Via News Rewired ‘10 things every journalist should know about data’ by Sarah Marshall

Every journalist needs to know about data. It is not just the preserve of the investigative journalist but can – and should – be used by reporters writing for local papers, magazines, the consumer and trade press and for online publications.

—Via News Rewired ‘10 things every journalist should know about data’ by Sarah Marshall

 
Data Journalism Broken Down: What we do with the data before you see it

Before a dataset results in a data journalism story, there’s a whole process of sifting and finessing and generally sorting the data out. The split is roughly 70% tidying up the data, 30% doing the fun stuff of visualising and presenting it. So, how do we get through that 70%?
Guardian graphic artist Mark McCormick has helped us visualise that process. So, yes, this is a graphic about how we produce data that often results in, er, graphics. A data visualisation about data visualisations, if you will.

—Via Guardian UK

 

Data Journalism Broken Down: What we do with the data before you see it

Before a dataset results in a data journalism story, there’s a whole process of sifting and finessing and generally sorting the data out. The split is roughly 70% tidying up the data, 30% doing the fun stuff of visualising and presenting it. So, how do we get through that 70%?

Guardian graphic artist Mark McCormick has helped us visualise that process. So, yes, this is a graphic about how we produce data that often results in, er, graphics. A data visualisation about data visualisations, if you will.

—Via Guardian UK