Posts tagged Fox

Cable on Climate Science

Via the Union of Concerned Scientists:

CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC are the most widely watched cable news networks in the U.S. Their coverage of climate change is an influential source of information for the public and policy makers alike.

To gauge how accurately these networks inform their audiences about climate change, UCS analyzed the networks’ climate science coverage in 2013 and found that each network treated climate science very differently.

Fox News was the least accurate; 72 percent of its 2013 climate science-related segments contained misleading statements. CNN was in the middle, with about a third of segments featuring misleading statements. MSNBC was the most accurate, with only eight percent of segments containing misleading statements.

Read the overview here, or jump to the study here (PDF).

Images: Science or Spin?: Assessing the Accuracy of Cable News Coverage of Climate Science, via Union of Concerned Scientists

Colbert Report Creates a Bot to #PraiseFOX

Watch the above for the details and then head to @RealHumanPraise for the shenanigans.

Six of the seven shows analyzed — This Week, Face the Nation, Fox News Sunday, Meet the Press, State of the Union, and Up — have hosted white men at a significantly higher rate than their 31 percent portion of the population. Melissa Harris-Perry provided the greatest diversity among guests, providing a much higher rate of white women and African-American guests than the other programs; Up also hosted a higher percentage of people from those demographics than CNN or the broadcast programs. Latino, Asian-American, and Middle Eastern guests have been largely absent from the Sunday shows. Native Americans fared even worse, with only two appearances (one on Melissa Harris-Perry and one on Up) out of a total of 2,436 appearances over the nine-month period studied.

White Men Were An Even Larger Proportion Of Solo Interviews. On the broadcast Sunday shows and CNN, white men were most often hosted for one-on-one interviews by a significant margin. 75 percent of Face the Nation and Fox News Sunday solo interview subjects were white men. Once again, only Melissa Harris-Perry demonstrated any reasonable diversity in this measure. Guests who were Latino, Asian-American, or Middle Eastern were hardly present at all. No Native American has received a one-on-one interview this year. Up did not have enough solo interviews in the period studied to be included in the comparison.

Media Matters for America, Once Again, Sunday Morning Talk Shows Are White, Male, And Conservative.

Read through for CNN’s gender problem and the overall ideological tilt toward conservative (read: Republican) guests.

Vice was once a humble magazine about doing heroin and having sex (on heroin). Now, Vice is a global multimedia company, partly owned by Fox, valued at $1.4 billion. Vice is so successful that it no longer needs to exist.

On Friday, news broke that 21st Century Fox, which was recently spun off from News Corp, is sinking $70 million into Vice for a 5% stake in the company. That means the notional value of Vice as a whole is $1.4 billion. That means that Vice is worth about six times as much as the Washington Post, and just a wee bit less than the New York Times. If there was any doubt left, the counterculture has now become the establishment. There is now only one degree of separation between Rupert Murdoch and “The Meth-Fueled, Weeklong Orgies Ravaging London’s Gay-Sex Party Scene.”
Hamilton Nolan, Gawker. The Revolution Will Not Be Vice.

Groundhog's Day: DOJ Tracks Fox Reporter's Phone Records

Last week’s news was that the Justice Department seized two months of Associated Press phone records.

This week’s begins with a report that the DOJ surveilled Fox News’ chief Washington correspondent James Rosen, tracking his visits to the State Department in an apparent attempt to link a 2009 leak of classified information about North Korea to government adviser Stephen Jin-Woo Kim

Via the Washington Post:

When the Justice Department began investigating possible leaks of classified information about North Korea in 2009, investigators did more than obtain telephone records of a working journalist suspected of receiving the secret material.

They used security badge access records to track the reporter’s comings and goings from the State Department, according to a newly obtained court affidavit. They traced the timing of his calls with a State Department security adviser suspected of sharing the classified report. They obtained a search warrant for the reporter’s personal e-mails.

The case of Stephen Jin-Woo Kim, the government adviser, and James Rosen, the chief Washington correspondent for Fox News, bears striking similarities to a sweeping leaks investigation disclosed last week in which federal investigators obtained records over two months of more than 20 telephone lines assigned to the Associated Press…

…Court documents in the Kim case reveal how deeply investigators explored the private communications of a working journalist — and raise the question of how often journalists have been investigated as closely as Rosen was in 2010. The case also raises new concerns among critics of government secrecy about the possible stifling effect of these investigations on a critical element of press freedom: the exchange of information between reporters and their sources.

Washington Post, A rare peek into a Justice Department leak probe.

Spin?
One could, of course, do this across all sorts of media outlets.
For the educators though, an interesting media literacy exercise in how news outlets exist as brands and the messaging they hope to transmit.
Take screenshots across news organizations and decipher how word choice, positioning, heds and deks illustrate an organizational bias.
Image: Fox News Home Page, November 2. Taken and annotated by Ethan Gold. Select to embiggen.

Spin?

One could, of course, do this across all sorts of media outlets.

For the educators though, an interesting media literacy exercise in how news outlets exist as brands and the messaging they hope to transmit.

Take screenshots across news organizations and decipher how word choice, positioning, heds and deks illustrate an organizational bias.

Image: Fox News Home Page, November 2. Taken and annotated by Ethan Gold. Select to embiggen.

Fox Nation with an… alternative point of view.
Update: They’ve toned it down a bit and the headline now reads, “Obama Flip Flops on Gay Marriage.”

Fox Nation with an… alternative point of view.

Update: They’ve toned it down a bit and the headline now reads, “Obama Flip Flops on Gay Marriage.”

This is Going to Get Awkward: Fox News Finds Gawker Mole

Yesterday, Gawker published an article by their newest contributor, “The Fox Mole,” a long-time employee of the network.

In it, the mole outlines his or her long list of grievances and then gives a behind the scenes account (and video) of pre-interview chatter between Mitt Romney and Sean Hannity where they talk horseback riding, primping and Donald Trump.

Today, Fox confirms to Mediaite that they know who The Fox Mole is. In a terse statement they write, “We found the person and we’re exploring legal options at this time.”

Segments Covering Trayvon Martin on Cable News, Feb 26 to March 19.
Via ThinkProgress.

Segments Covering Trayvon Martin on Cable News, Feb 26 to March 19.

Via ThinkProgress.

horaciogaray:

The #answer and #dodge results for the Fox debate

FJP: Last night Fox News and Twitter worked together to comb hashtags and get real-time audience feedback on how candidates were answering questions. Pictured above: did a candidate answer or dodge a question.

horaciogaray:

The #answer and #dodge results for the Fox debate

FJP: Last night Fox News and Twitter worked together to comb hashtags and get real-time audience feedback on how candidates were answering questions. Pictured above: did a candidate answer or dodge a question.

Fox was game to experiment with us on something that hadn’t been done before — real-time measurement of audience reaction over Twitter.

Adam Sharp, manager of government and political partnerships for Twitter in Washington, in a statement to the New York Times. Fox and Twitter Join Forces for Republican Debate 

The news: During Monday’s Republican primary debate, Fox News and Twitter will analyze hashtags and feeds (in particular, #answer and #dodge) in an attempt to get real-time metrics on audience views.

In turn, Fox will display trends on its Web site and commentators will use the data as they analyze the debate afterwards.

Even Big Media Companies Do It

Via TorrentFeak:

With increasing lobbying efforts from the entertainment industry against BitTorrent sites and users, we wondered whether these companies hold themselves to the same standards they demand of others. After some initial skimming we’ve discovered BitTorrent pirates at nearly every major entertainment industry company in the US, including Sony Pictures Entertainment, Fox Entertainment and NBC Universal. Busted.

A few days ago we wrote about a new website that exposes what people behind an IP-address have downloaded on BitTorrent. The Russian-based founders of the site developed the service so people can show their friends how public their downloading habits are, and that is exactly what we’re going to do today.

Armed with the IP-ranges of major Hollywood studios we decided to find out what they’ve been downloading. As expected, it didn’t take us long before we found BitTorrent ‘pirates’ at several leading entertainment industry companies. Yes, these are the same companies who want to disconnect people from the Internet after they’ve been caught sharing copyrighted material.

Do as I say, not as I do?

Images: Screenshots of content downloaded from Fox, Universal and Sony’s respective IP addresses.

What passes for news and debate on our mainstream networks, circa August 2011, USA.
Update: Sorry about that. Itchy trigger finger. This is actually from Louis CK’s show. Thanks to mlesblog and youngdankenstein for quickly pointing that out.
Clip can be seen here.
Egg… meet face.

What passes for news and debate on our mainstream networks, circa August 2011, USA.

Update: Sorry about that. Itchy trigger finger. This is actually from Louis CK’s show. Thanks to mlesblog and youngdankenstein for quickly pointing that out.

Clip can be seen here.

Egg… meet face.

Seven years ago, Robert Greenwald and Brave New Films released Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism. While it wasn’t released theatrically, MoveOn.org and the Center for American Progress helped organize “house parties” around the country where people could come together to watch it. 

Writing in the New York Times at the time, AO Scott noted:

The partisan nature of ”Outfoxed,” a series of expository and analytical talking-head segments interspersed with the high-octane flag-draped shouting-head segments that have become Fox’s trademark, is obvious. It is also, therefore, a little beside the point. In the American media, like it or not, the job of exposing bias is often taken up by people and organizations with a definite point of view. 

This evening, Greenwald will host an event to discuss the movie and the continuing Murdoch empire. He’ll be joined by Cenk Uygur (The Young Turks; former MSNBC host), Janeane Garofalo (Actor/Comedian), Katrina vanden Heuvel (The Nation), James Rucker (ColorofChange.org) and Ilyse Hogue (Media Matters). Should be lively in light of the the News Corp / News of the World phone hacking scandal.

If you have questions for Greenwald or his guests, you can submit them here. And if you’d like to watch, the Webcast kicks off at 5pm PT (8pm ET).

Comics: Selected Doonesbury from July 2004.