Posts tagged GOP

Paul Ryan Reading Guide: The Best Reporting on the VP Candidate

As partisans double down and dig deep to define the vice presidential candidate, ProPublica has a great roundup of reporting from the last three years that explore his economic, foreign, and social policy positions.

Some of it’s familiar territory, some if it surprises. 

For example, Mother Jones’ Ryan’s Unlikely Alliance with Organized Labor (surprise), and the New York Times’ A Closer Look at Ryan’s Budget Roadmaps that indicates “the tax cuts in Paul Ryan’s 2013 budget plan would result in huge benefits for high-income people and very modest—or no— benefits for low income working households” (not a surprise).

ProPublica, Paul Ryan Reading Guide: The Best Reporting on the VP Candidate.

I can see you’re all eager to hear about my days working in the private sector… — David Horsey, Los Angeles Times. From Prop. 8 to birth control, Santorum leads the culture war.

I can see you’re all eager to hear about my days working in the private sector… — David Horsey, Los Angeles Times. From Prop. 8 to birth control, Santorum leads the culture war.

horaciogaray:

The #answer and #dodge results for the Fox debate

FJP: Last night Fox News and Twitter worked together to comb hashtags and get real-time audience feedback on how candidates were answering questions. Pictured above: did a candidate answer or dodge a question.

horaciogaray:

The #answer and #dodge results for the Fox debate

FJP: Last night Fox News and Twitter worked together to comb hashtags and get real-time audience feedback on how candidates were answering questions. Pictured above: did a candidate answer or dodge a question.

Iowa to New Hampshire: A Three-Horse Race
Social Bakers, a social media analytics firm, is analyzing the 2012 presidential race at a politics microsite they’ve created.
Yesterday they released Facebook findings from the last 30 days in the Republican primaries. Key observations:

Santorum increased fan base by 107%, followed by Paul at 14% and Romney at 7%
Santorum leads the top three candidates in number of posts shared – 6X more than Paul and 5X more than Romney
For Santorum and Paul, posts that include a link have the most number of interactions (“likes” and comments), followed by posts with photos. For Romney, status updates have the most number of interactions, followed by posts with photos.
The top three candidates have shared an average of 19 videos on Facebook, with Santorum leading with 36 video posts

Image: Detail from Iowa to New Hampshire: A Three-Horse Race? via Social Bakers.

Iowa to New Hampshire: A Three-Horse Race

Social Bakers, a social media analytics firm, is analyzing the 2012 presidential race at a politics microsite they’ve created.

Yesterday they released Facebook findings from the last 30 days in the Republican primaries. Key observations:

  • Santorum increased fan base by 107%, followed by Paul at 14% and Romney at 7%
  • Santorum leads the top three candidates in number of posts shared – 6X more than Paul and 5X more than Romney
  • For Santorum and Paul, posts that include a link have the most number of interactions (“likes” and comments), followed by posts with photos. For Romney, status updates have the most number of interactions, followed by posts with photos.
  • The top three candidates have shared an average of 19 videos on Facebook, with Santorum leading with 36 video posts

Image: Detail from Iowa to New Hampshire: A Three-Horse Race? via Social Bakers.

In politics, size matters.
How large is the mailing list, how much money was raised and, increasingly, how many friends, followers and other social networking whatnot all becomes valuable lucre in the media’s horse race coverage of the next election.
Enter Newt Gingrich.
A social media mastermind proclaims an astonished press as it looks at his 1.3 million plus Twitter followers. 
Yet, like most things, what we see is not necessarily true. Mashable reports that over 90% of Gingrich’s Twitter followers aren’t even human. It appears that he’s been paying to build up his overall number count but instead of people he’s getting robots, zombies and the undead following him.
Image: Robot Runamuck by Bob Canada via Flickr.

In politics, size matters.

How large is the mailing list, how much money was raised and, increasingly, how many friends, followers and other social networking whatnot all becomes valuable lucre in the media’s horse race coverage of the next election.

Enter Newt Gingrich.

A social media mastermind proclaims an astonished press as it looks at his 1.3 million plus Twitter followers. 

Yet, like most things, what we see is not necessarily true. Mashable reports that over 90% of Gingrich’s Twitter followers aren’t even human. It appears that he’s been paying to build up his overall number count but instead of people he’s getting robots, zombies and the undead following him.

Image: Robot Runamuck by Bob Canada via Flickr.

If Candidates Debate in the Woods...

Republicans held their first primary debate last night. Those that appeared are barely considered long shots for the party’s presidential nomination. Needless to say, they received scant attention in the press.  

Via Slate:

The Times doesn’t actually name its first candidate, Pawlenty, until the seventh paragraph of a 22-paragraph story. The other four men have to wait another seven graphs before seeing their names in print. (The story’s lead: “A quorum may be needed to follow parliamentary procedure, but not to put on a presidential debate.”)

Pawlenty drew an early mention in both the Post and the Journal, followed closely by Santorum. But the other three contenders were again left waiting, a total of seven graphs in the Post and six in the Journal.

Adding insult to injury for Paul, Johnson and Cain, the Post devoted a greater percentage of its story to a Thursday op-ed that Pawlenty wrote for the Daily Caller urging his party’s A-Listers to jump into the race than the paper did to the trio’s debate performances.

Consider it as the GOP’s equivalent of baseball’s spring training… except that people actually focus on baseball’s spring training.