posts about or somewhat related to ‘Good’

5 Tips for Sourcing Infographics →

We’re big fans of Column Five Media for their style, content, and consistency (and we often share their graphics on the FJP Pinterest). Here are their tips for sourcing infographics:

1. Make Sure the Source(s) Tell a Story. 

If you’re not ‘telling a story’ with your infographic (read: explaining a narrative or allowing a narrative to be explored), then you’re doing it wrong. Essentially that story will be derived from the sources that you decide to use. People are going to want to engage an infographic that tells a story that they care to know. See my previous article on ways to identify story-worthiness for more on this subject specifically. In short, there is no shortage of data out there, but not all data is all that interesting, even if it’s visualized in a very interesting way.

2. Make Sure Your Sources are Reliable.

Not all data producers are created equal. Always use data sets from as unbiased a producer as possible. Good sources include data collected or produced by government agencies, such as the statistics compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau or the Department of Labor. Other top-tier data sources can include industry white papers, surveys conducted by reputable think tanks/research organizations or findings published in academic publications. (Read on to learn how to judge sources.)

3. Make Sure Your Sources are Relevant.

The world changes quickly, and the pace of change is accelerating. To ensure you’re on the right track for sourcing your infographics, use the most recently published version of the data you’ve decided to use… As a rule of thumb, try not to use data that’s more than a year old. Two years is acceptable in some cases, if that’s the best you can get. Beyond this, use discretion. In all cases, be up front about the age of the data set you are using; you would expect the same from others. Always list the age within the sources or in the graphic’s copy. This provides context and clarity, and is a practice no different than writing a college research paper. 

4. Limit Your Sources for Consistency.

Finding multiple data sets from multiple sources on one subject can be exciting, but don’t get ahead of yourself… A good rule of thumb is to use only one data set, if this is an option. Two or three are acceptable. But the more you add, the more variance you get from different methods, different contexts, and different priorities of the data producers.

5. Cite Your Sources Appropriately.

When it comes to structuring the content, make sure that a proper context is provided for your readers. While we’ve already established that data should be recent, reliable and credible and consistent, when you’re creating an infographic from multiple sources it is important to provide as much context to the reader as possible about what information came from what source.

FJP: Those were excerpts. Click-through to read the full piece. Solid tips.

Sort of Related: You can make your own (um…really simple) infographic at GOOD labs

Infographic: How is the Newspaper Industry Trying to Save Itself?
via GOOD & Column Five Media

Infographic: How is the Newspaper Industry Trying to Save Itself?

via GOOD & Column Five Media

A History of Journalism & Pot
Happy 4/20, dear readers. Today we offer to you our round-up of journalism+pot fun facts because yes, they have a complicated history.
Hemp used to be everywhere. The first Bibles, maps, charts, and drafts of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were made from hemp. (via)
In 1938, Mechanical Engineering Magazine published an article stating that hemp was the most profitable and desirable crop in the US and the world. (via)
A Conspiracy Theory: The Hearst Company used to supply most paper products and could stand to lose a lot of money because of hemp. Consequently, financial tycoons held secret meetings conspiring to get rid of hemp. In a media blitz of yellow journalism, Hearst’s newspapers ran stories on the horrors of marijuana. (via)
The term 4/20 was coined by a group of five San Rafael High School students known as the Waldos (because they used to hang out by a wall outside school and smoke pot at 4:20). (via)
A journalist spread the story about the Waldos. Steven Bloom, then a reporter for High Times magazine (now publisher of CelebStoner.com), wrote the story pictured above. (via)
High Times then took the term global: 

"I started incorporating it into everything we were doing," High Times editor Steve Hager told the Huffington Post. "I started doing all these big events - the World Hemp Expo Extravaganza and the Cannabis Cup - and we built everything around 420. The publicity that High Times gave it is what made it an international thing. Until then, it was relatively confined to the Grateful Dead subculture. But we blew it out into an international phenomenon."

Bonus:
In honor of today, The Huffington Post presents 16 ways weed impacts the economy.
If you want keep to read interesting things about pot, follow GOOD’s resident pot columnist.
Image Via: Huffington Post

A History of Journalism & Pot

Happy 4/20, dear readers. Today we offer to you our round-up of journalism+pot fun facts because yes, they have a complicated history.

  • Hemp used to be everywhere. The first Bibles, maps, charts, and drafts of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were made from hemp. (via)
  • In 1938, Mechanical Engineering Magazine published an article stating that hemp was the most profitable and desirable crop in the US and the world. (via)
  • A Conspiracy Theory: The Hearst Company used to supply most paper products and could stand to lose a lot of money because of hemp. Consequently, financial tycoons held secret meetings conspiring to get rid of hemp. In a media blitz of yellow journalism, Hearst’s newspapers ran stories on the horrors of marijuana. (via)
  • The term 4/20 was coined by a group of five San Rafael High School students known as the Waldos (because they used to hang out by a wall outside school and smoke pot at 4:20). (via)
  • A journalist spread the story about the Waldos. Steven Bloom, then a reporter for High Times magazine (now publisher of CelebStoner.com), wrote the story pictured above. (via)
  • High Times then took the term global: 

"I started incorporating it into everything we were doing," High Times editor Steve Hager told the Huffington Post. "I started doing all these big events - the World Hemp Expo Extravaganza and the Cannabis Cup - and we built everything around 420. The publicity that High Times gave it is what made it an international thing. Until then, it was relatively confined to the Grateful Dead subculture. But we blew it out into an international phenomenon."

Bonus:

Image Via: Huffington Post

5 Steps to a More Balanced Media Diet →

Every month, GOOD invites its readers to a 30-day challenge and offers up a tip or assignment each day. This month, it’s all about spring cleaning…your life. Today’s post, cleaning up your information diet. 

1. Clean up RSS feeds and bookmarks. My Google Reader was the first to get a makeover. I cut out subscriptions that weren’t adding value to my life. TMZ got the axe when I realized that 95 percent of its coverage was of celebrity has-beens and other people I didn’t even know. (TMZ is only great in emergency situations, i.e. Whitney’s death.) Perez Hilton also had to go because the snark is often too egregious and mean-spirited. Both sites post too frequently for me to get through all of their content, so purging those feeds felt like a relief. If you don’t use an RSS, go through your bookmarks folder instead. Ask yourself: Do I trust this source? How much of my  time does it take up? What do I get out of reading this content?

2. Let your social feeds lead you to the good stuff. Check out what your friends are reading on social networks. They’ll likely share stories that interest you. Many of my Facebook friends use theWashington Post Social Reader, so I’m often reading much more from my hometown newspaper because I’m clicking through their links. Also, add a few popular media feeds to your Facebook and Twitter so you’re always getting a good mix. I like to balance between straight news (CNN and NPR), smart culture writing (The AwlJezebelThe Believer), and a few special-interest sites with great writing (ColorlinesGrantland).

3. Set boundaries. You can get carried away on social networks, of course. You may see lots of news stories but only click on the one about Angelina Jolie’s engagement ring. Understandable—it’s a beautiful ring—but the real answer is to set time limits for yourself. I used to keep my Twitter feed open all day but now I only check in the morning and in the evening. Usually, mainstream news sources are updating their top stories in the morning while the evening stream is a bit more random. That means I feel a bit more informed about serious topics at the start of the day and let myself unwind at the end. Set rules for the amount of time you’re willing to spend monitoring a site. Wired has a helpful graphic about how to break up your nearly nine hours of screen time.

4. E-mail articles. If you’re like me, it’s easier for you to act on something if it’s in an e-mail. Instead of searching for ‘serious’ journalism, let it come to you. For $1.99 a month, I subscribe to The Best of Journalism, a newsletter of excellent long-form journalism curated by The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf. Each week, I get to read some of the best sports, science, international, and local reporting on the web. Some of the stories will make you laugh, others will make you tear up, like this recent selection about the rape of men during war. As extra incentive, I won’t move these messages from my inbox until I’ve read every story inside.

5. Embrace overlaps. For a pop culture junkie, #Kony2012 was the perfect storm of highbrow-lowbrow gossip. We got real discussions about Ugandan military policy, and we also got public masturbation. Overlaps like this can be the best way to get your trashy gossip fix while still weaning yourself off the most superficial stories. If you want to expand on your knowledge of celebrity breakups, start shifting to the next best thing: political scandals. If you’re dying to talk about Chris Brown’s latest collaboration with Rihanna, learning more about his actions in the context of domestic violence discourse will elevate the conversation.

Chris Hughes's Jumo And GOOD Join Forces →

GOOD, publisher of the magazine by the same name and the social action platform is acquiring Jumo, the cause-oriented social network created by Facebook and team Barack Obama veteran Chris Hughes.

Very interesting move and definitely makes sense by combining Good’s content and Jumo’s community platform. 

For example: 

Jumo has been piloting some community fundraising campaigns, like a recent one for victims of the Somalia drought, that have yielded good results. But keeping interest alive in the do-gooder space can be tough. Hughes says he has learned a lot. “People need carefully curated content if you are going to sustain their interest,” he says. “Particularly in the context of the not for profit world. People have to be consistently inspired, outraged, or excited. And there are nonprofits out there who are doing noble work in their communities and good jobs with their social outreach, but simply can’t generate enough content, particularly on local issues.

Via PopTech.

Good jobs. Literally.
Good is hiring on both the West and East coast.

Good jobs. Literally.

Good is hiring on both the West and East coast.

Call and Response… or Symmetry as the Case May Be.

Recently, WNYC’s RadioLab ran a program that explored how “symmetry shapes our very existence—from the origins of the universe, to what we see when we look in the mirror.”

NYC filmmakers Everynone took note, collaborated and came back with few minute video response.

Audio. Video. Symmetry.