posts about or somewhat related to ‘Infographic’

Eastern vs. Western Perspectives on Daily Life
via Drama Fever:

Yang Liu is an artist who was born in China but lived in Germany from the time she was 14. She designed this series of infographics to represent her observations about Chinese culture and German culture. She covers a broad variety of subjects, from what a typical party looks like to attitudes towards waiting in line.

They’re all pretty great and true.  Above: Moods & Weather.

Eastern vs. Western Perspectives on Daily Life

via Drama Fever:

Yang Liu is an artist who was born in China but lived in Germany from the time she was 14. She designed this series of infographics to represent her observations about Chinese culture and German culture. She covers a broad variety of subjects, from what a typical party looks like to attitudes towards waiting in line.

They’re all pretty great and true.  Above: Moods & Weather.

What are the Top 100 Grossing Feature Docs of All Time all about?
Stats show that the top 100 documentaries are pretty even when it comes to content and genre. It’s no surprise that biography is slightly in the lead (29/100). These numbers are very significant however, because it shows that there’s no “golden formula” for what documentaries will become box office hits. What matters is the quality of the story you tell and the audience you’re telling it to.—Gabbi 

What are the Top 100 Grossing Feature Docs of All Time all about?

Stats show that the top 100 documentaries are pretty even when it comes to content and genre. It’s no surprise that biography is slightly in the lead (29/100). These numbers are very significant however, because it shows that there’s no “golden formula” for what documentaries will become box office hits. What matters is the quality of the story you tell and the audience you’re telling it to.—Gabbi 

Infographic: Tweets, Television & Tune-In 

Via Nielsen

A new independent study by Nielsen provides, for the first time, statistical evidence of a two-way causal influence between broadcast TV tune-in for a program and the Twitter conversation around that program. The study used time series analysis to determine if Twitter activity drives increased tune-in rates for broadcast TV and if broadcast TV tune-in leads to increased Twitter activity. By analyzing minute-to-minute trends in Nielsen’s live TV ratings and tweets for 221 broadcast primetime program episodes using Nielsen’s SocialGuide, the study found that live TV ratings had a meaningful impact in related tweets among 48 percent of the episodes sampled. The results also showed that the volume of tweets caused significant changes in live TV ratings among 29 percent of the episodes.

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV
Via Mashable: 

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV

Via Mashable

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

fjp-latinamerica:

Day of the Dead (Journalists)

The Mexican chapter of the Article 19 organization has set up an amazing special site [in Spanish, yet very graphical and easy to navigate] in observance of the Day of the Dead, honoring the fallen journalists who have lost their lives in the pursuit of truth amid Mexico’s drug war. 

Here is the rationale of the project, via Artículo 19:

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican folk tradition dating from pre-Columbian times, based on the belief that people’s souls return from the underworld to visit their families and loved ones. The tradition continues to this day with a mixture of indigenous beliefs with Catholic traditions.

The colors, the music, the food, and the the celebrations take place to honor the people who no longer exist in the material world but remain alive in the spiritual realm.

Therefore, here at Article 19, we want to remember on this day the deaths of 71 journalists murdered for reasons relating to their journalistic work, pay homage to them with an altar as a sign that they have not been forgotten, and as a continuing demand for justice for each of them.

FJP: As we have noted before, Artículo 19 has been doing an outstanding job at documenting violence against journalists across Mexico. Kudos.

Pet Peeve: ‘Los’ in translation. The correct name in Spanish of said Mexican tradition is Día de Muertos, not Día de los Muertos.

Images: Papel Picado (perforated paper), by Artículo 19.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

Infographic: How is the Newspaper Industry Trying to Save Itself?
via GOOD & Column Five Media

Infographic: How is the Newspaper Industry Trying to Save Itself?

via GOOD & Column Five Media

Infographic: How Social Media is Replacing Traditional Journalism for Breaking News
via Bill Moyers:

As of 2012, online news revenue has surpassed print news revenue, and more people are using social media tools like Facebook and Twitter for news than ever before. This infographic shows that nearly half of all Americans get their news from online sources at least three times a week. Learn more about how social media is supplanting traditional media in today’s smart chart.

H/T: Schools.com

Infographic: How Social Media is Replacing Traditional Journalism for Breaking News

via Bill Moyers:

As of 2012, online news revenue has surpassed print news revenue, and more people are using social media tools like Facebook and Twitter for news than ever before. This infographic shows that nearly half of all Americans get their news from online sources at least three times a week. Learn more about how social media is supplanting traditional media in today’s smart chart.

H/T: Schools.com

Is CISPA Really SOPA’s Evil Twin?
First, check out this infographic.
via Gigaom:

The criticism that, by including a provision for the protection of intellectual property, CISPA is little more than a less-conspicuous form of the draconian SOPA bill seems misguided. CISPA is vague and unnecessarily broad, but it’s not SOPA. In fact, the very same Internet companies that were so adamantly opposed to SOPA might support CISPA. Facebook already does. 
CISPA is actually good, in theory. The idea of sharing cybersecurity information between private companies and the government has merit, especially in a world of increased cyberattacks against organizations in both sectors. If you’re trying to discover patterns in attacks, more data is always better, and web sites are attacked constantly. That they also could have access to classified government data is particularly beneficial.
But CISPA isn’t perfect. In fact, it’s vague to the point of being a problem, which is what’s driving concern over the bill. To me, CISPA doesn’t read like SOPA in disguise, but it doesn’t expressly deny that possibility either.
Probably the biggest problem is what a company is able to do to “protect” itself from such threats. As the EFF points out, CISPA allows companies to “use cybersecurity systems to identify and obtain cyber threat information to protect the rights and property of such protected entity.” It also grants companies immunity from lawsuits if they exercise their rights under the bill in good faith.
(Keep Reading)

Infographic by Lumin Consulting
Image via ReadWriteWeb. 

Is CISPA Really SOPA’s Evil Twin?

First, check out this infographic.

via Gigaom:

The criticism that, by including a provision for the protection of intellectual property, CISPA is little more than a less-conspicuous form of the draconian SOPA bill seems misguided. CISPA is vague and unnecessarily broad, but it’s not SOPA. In fact, the very same Internet companies that were so adamantly opposed to SOPA might support CISPA. Facebook already does. 

CISPA is actually good, in theory. The idea of sharing cybersecurity information between private companies and the government has merit, especially in a world of increased cyberattacks against organizations in both sectors. If you’re trying to discover patterns in attacks, more data is always better, and web sites are attacked constantly. That they also could have access to classified government data is particularly beneficial.

But CISPA isn’t perfect. In fact, it’s vague to the point of being a problem, which is what’s driving concern over the bill. To me, CISPA doesn’t read like SOPA in disguise, but it doesn’t expressly deny that possibility either.

Probably the biggest problem is what a company is able to do to “protect” itself from such threats. As the EFF points out, CISPA allows companies to “use cybersecurity systems to identify and obtain cyber threat information to protect the rights and property of such protected entity.” It also grants companies immunity from lawsuits if they exercise their rights under the bill in good faith.

(Keep Reading)

Infographic by Lumin Consulting

Image via ReadWriteWeb

Four Ways to Slice Obama’s 2013 Budget Proposal

A slightly hallucinogenic interactive from the New York Times.

Images: Screenshots of the New York Times infographic on President Obama’s budget proposal. Green indicates an increase in spending. Red indicates a decrease. Shown here are the overall budget, changes in discretionary spending and budgets by department. 

futuramb:

Intel’s view of the future of Internet of Things in one infographic

futuramb:

Intel’s view of the future of Internet of Things in one infographic

How we use social media during emergencies [infographic]
Via Mashable

How we use social media during emergencies [infographic]

Via Mashable

Demographics of Social Media Users (infographic)

Demographics of Social Media Users (infographic)



When it comes to industrial design, few consumer electronics or computer makers have the legacy or influence of Apple, Inc. In the last 35 years, Apple has introduced a myriad of products and devices, some very successful, some, not so much.
Artist Mike Vasilev created this infographic for Mashable, highlighting the major Apple product releases and design changes from 1976 through 2011.
With rumors of the iPhone 5, iPhone 6 and a smaller, lower-cost iPhone all spreading through the technosphere, we feel certain that at least one more item will be added to the “redesign” list before 2011 closes out.



via Mashable

When it comes to industrial design, few consumer electronics or computer makers have the legacy or influence of Apple, Inc. In the last 35 years, Apple has introduced a myriad of products and devices, some very successful, some, not so much.

Artist Mike Vasilev created this infographic for Mashable, highlighting the major Apple product releases and design changes from 1976 through 2011.

With rumors of the iPhone 5, iPhone 6 and a smaller, lower-cost iPhone all spreading through the technosphere, we feel certain that at least one more item will be added to the “redesign” list before 2011 closes out.

via Mashable