Posts tagged with ‘Infographics’

Who Owns Media (US Edition)

Via Gizmodo, which also includes graphics on what brands own what consumer goods, consolidation in financial markets, what auto makers own what cars, and what breweries make what beer… which is important.

Images: Studios and media companies (top), and TV stations (bottom). Select to embiggen.

navigatingmedia:

How to Communicate Visually 
For all you visualizaton junkies, (or really just anyone who dares to make an infographic), a fantastic free e-book from Column Five Media on visual communication (applicable to designers, editors, advertisers or academics). Image is a screenshot from the book, which you can download here.

navigatingmedia:

How to Communicate Visually 

For all you visualizaton junkies, (or really just anyone who dares to make an infographic), a fantastic free e-book from Column Five Media on visual communication (applicable to designers, editors, advertisers or academics). Image is a screenshot from the book, which you can download here.

How to Create a Well-Balanced Blog
A new graphic by Column Five Media + LinkedIn Marketing Solutions uses the increasingly popular media-as-food analogy to offer tips to brands (but really, everyone) on what sort of content to publish on their blogs, when and how. Image is a screenshot from the original infographic, which you can read about and see in its entirety here.

How to Create a Well-Balanced Blog

A new graphic by Column Five Media + LinkedIn Marketing Solutions uses the increasingly popular media-as-food analogy to offer tips to brands (but really, everyone) on what sort of content to publish on their blogs, when and how. Image is a screenshot from the original infographic, which you can read about and see in its entirety here.

theparisreview:

This series of infographics, illustrating how different parts of the country say different things, is fascinating. Below: mayonnaise.

FJP: Neat.

theparisreview:

This series of infographics, illustrating how different parts of the country say different things, is fascinating. Below: mayonnaise.

FJP: Neat.

How to Generate Good Ideas

Column Five:

This spring, we set out to answer the question “Where do good ideas come from?” in the form of a motion graphic that would serve as a companion piece for a course we developed for Columbia University’s graduate program in Information and Knowledge Strategy (Visualization of Information). We quickly realized that perhaps we needed to reevaluate the basis of this question before we answered it. The notion that good ideas simply come to people out of the blue didn’t satisfy us because it didn’t give adequate credit to the creative enterprise of the individual or group. Good ideas aren’t simply lying around like seashells on a beach waiting for us to pick them up nor are they so random.

We determined the better question to ask was “How are good ideas generated?” Good ideas—as we suggest in this video—are the result of the focused action that takes place in our brains. What better metaphor for this focus, we thought, than a prism? With a bit of stretching the laws of physics and a lot of imagination, we set out to craft a story about how all those bits and pieces that pass through our brains can become good ideas.

Keep Reading

FJP: Fun to watch and somewhat refreshing and necessary to hear when frustrated with creating.

An Infographic Is
That about explains it, no?
See our interviews with Bitly’s Hilary Mason for more on working with data.
Image: An Infographic Is, by Karyn Lurie.
H/T: Chart Porn.

An Infographic Is

That about explains it, no?

See our interviews with Bitly’s Hilary Mason for more on working with data.

Image: An Infographic Is, by Karyn Lurie.

H/T: Chart Porn.

If I think back to the first object that I consciously thought of as a piece of (information) design, two things come to mind: the narrative illustrations created by my father and the maps found in cartography books. There’s one specific book that I’ve kept around ever since. It’s the Schweizer Weltatlas, my geography book from 6th grade with an extensive appendix full of mesmerizing thematic maps that visualize ecological, political, and social data.

Benjamin Wiederkehr, managing director and founding member of Interactive Things, the Zurich based design studio, in a recent interview on the future of interactive visualizations.

There are a few things evolving side by side that will influence how visualizations will look a few years from now. First, although visualization has been a research topic for quite some time now, I still see new approaches being developed not only in academia but also by practitioners working in the industry. Second, the constantly improving computing power and the adoption of new technology allow for more complex, engaging, and connected visualizations to spread quickly over the web. Third, the vast amount of data being produced every day demands increasingly sophisticated tools for exploration, evaluation, and communication. To come by the increasing load of data, visualizations will need to scale in terms of performance, density, and interactivity.

FJP: Explore their work here. We’re long time fans.

curiositycounts:

A fresh (ink) take on the infographic. 

Via Visual News:

Paul Marcinkowski (AKA Kaplon) is the designer behind this tattoo infographic which he made for a class project at the Academy Of Fine Arts in Łódź, Poland. While poorly made infographics have been called the ‘plague’ of the internet, it’s great to see an artist sink their teeth into the medium and create something truly original.

FJP: 100% agreed.

curiositycounts:

A fresh (ink) take on the infographic. 

Via Visual News:

Paul Marcinkowski (AKA Kaplon) is the designer behind this tattoo infographic which he made for a class project at the Academy Of Fine Arts in Łódź, Poland. While poorly made infographics have been called the ‘plague’ of the internet, it’s great to see an artist sink their teeth into the medium and create something truly original.

FJP: 100% agreed.

(Source: curiositycounts)

5 Tips for Sourcing Infographics →

We’re big fans of Column Five Media for their style, content, and consistency (and we often share their graphics on the FJP Pinterest). Here are their tips for sourcing infographics:

1. Make Sure the Source(s) Tell a Story. 

If you’re not ‘telling a story’ with your infographic (read: explaining a narrative or allowing a narrative to be explored), then you’re doing it wrong. Essentially that story will be derived from the sources that you decide to use. People are going to want to engage an infographic that tells a story that they care to know. See my previous article on ways to identify story-worthiness for more on this subject specifically. In short, there is no shortage of data out there, but not all data is all that interesting, even if it’s visualized in a very interesting way.

2. Make Sure Your Sources are Reliable.

Not all data producers are created equal. Always use data sets from as unbiased a producer as possible. Good sources include data collected or produced by government agencies, such as the statistics compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau or the Department of Labor. Other top-tier data sources can include industry white papers, surveys conducted by reputable think tanks/research organizations or findings published in academic publications. (Read on to learn how to judge sources.)

3. Make Sure Your Sources are Relevant.

The world changes quickly, and the pace of change is accelerating. To ensure you’re on the right track for sourcing your infographics, use the most recently published version of the data you’ve decided to use… As a rule of thumb, try not to use data that’s more than a year old. Two years is acceptable in some cases, if that’s the best you can get. Beyond this, use discretion. In all cases, be up front about the age of the data set you are using; you would expect the same from others. Always list the age within the sources or in the graphic’s copy. This provides context and clarity, and is a practice no different than writing a college research paper. 

4. Limit Your Sources for Consistency.

Finding multiple data sets from multiple sources on one subject can be exciting, but don’t get ahead of yourself… A good rule of thumb is to use only one data set, if this is an option. Two or three are acceptable. But the more you add, the more variance you get from different methods, different contexts, and different priorities of the data producers.

5. Cite Your Sources Appropriately.

When it comes to structuring the content, make sure that a proper context is provided for your readers. While we’ve already established that data should be recent, reliable and credible and consistent, when you’re creating an infographic from multiple sources it is important to provide as much context to the reader as possible about what information came from what source.

FJP: Those were excerpts. Click-through to read the full piece. Solid tips.

Sort of Related: You can make your own (um…really simple) infographic at GOOD labs

Mapping Paid Maternity Leave
Via Think Progress:

Out of 178 nations, the U.S. is one of three that does not offer paid maternity leave benefits, let alone paid leave for fathers, which more than 50 of these nations offer. Here’s how the U.S. stacks up to 14 other countries:
In comparison, Canada and Norway offer generous benefits that can be shared between the father and mother, France offers about four months, and even Mexico and Pakistan are among the nations offer 12 weeks paid leave for mothers.
American women are offered 12 weeks of unpaid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act, which exempts companies with fewer than 50 paid employees, but in 2011, only 11 percent of private sector workers and 17 percent of public workers reported that they had access to paid maternity leave through their employer. And for first-time mothers, only about half can take paid leave when they give birth.

FJP: Puts things in perspective, don’t it?
Update: On Twitter, Sara Morrisson believes the graphic and ThinkProgress quote is misleading, as some US companies do offer paid maternity leave. She has a point. I should have included that what’s being referenced here is mandated paid maternity leave. As Working Mother recently reported, “A Families and Work Institute report found only 16 percent of the companies it surveyed offered fully paid maternity leave in 2008, down from 27 percent in 1998.” — Michael
Image: Mapping Paid Maternity Leave, via ThinkProgress.

Mapping Paid Maternity Leave

Via Think Progress:

Out of 178 nations, the U.S. is one of three that does not offer paid maternity leave benefits, let alone paid leave for fathers, which more than 50 of these nations offer. Here’s how the U.S. stacks up to 14 other countries:

In comparison, Canada and Norway offer generous benefits that can be shared between the father and mother, France offers about four months, and even Mexico and Pakistan are among the nations offer 12 weeks paid leave for mothers.

American women are offered 12 weeks of unpaid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act, which exempts companies with fewer than 50 paid employees, but in 2011, only 11 percent of private sector workers and 17 percent of public workers reported that they had access to paid maternity leave through their employer. And for first-time mothers, only about half can take paid leave when they give birth.

FJP: Puts things in perspective, don’t it?

Update: On Twitter, Sara Morrisson believes the graphic and ThinkProgress quote is misleading, as some US companies do offer paid maternity leave. She has a point. I should have included that what’s being referenced here is mandated paid maternity leave. As Working Mother recently reported, “A Families and Work Institute report found only 16 percent of the companies it surveyed offered fully paid maternity leave in 2008, down from 27 percent in 1998.” — Michael

Image: Mapping Paid Maternity Leave, via ThinkProgress.

The backwardness of political cartoons is especially evident when you compare them to the bounty of new forms of graphical political commentary on the Web. My Facebook and Twitter feeds brim with a wide variety of political art — biting infographics, hilarious image macros, irresistible Tumblrs (e.g., Kim Jong-il Looking at Things), clever Web comics, and even poignant listicles. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a traditional political cartoon appear on my various social-media channels…

…This isn’t surprising. Editorial cartoons were born in the era of newspapers, and while they now regularly appear on the Web—including in Slate—they remain stuck in the static, space-constrained, caricaturist mind-set of newsprint. The Pulitzers began awarding a prize for cartoons in 1922, and other than a few notable exceptions — Garry Trudeau’s Doonesbury in 1975, Berkeley Breathed’s Bloom County in 1987, and Mark Fiore’s animated cartoons in 2010 — the overwhelming majority of its awards have gone to traditional, single-panel cartoonists. It’s time for the Pulitzers to look past this old-fashioned medium and include graphics that are better attuned to this century.

My first suggestion would be for the committee to recognize infographics and interactive visualizations. Like most political cartoons, infographics are rarely funny. Unlike most political cartoons, the best infographics tend to pack a wallop.

Farhad Manjoo, Slate. Editorial Cartoons Are Stale, Simplistic, and Just Not Funny: The Pulitzer committee should honor slide shows, infographics, and listicles instead.

I don’t think the Pulitzer’s should abandon the editorial cartoon but absolutely agree there should be a new category for graphical stories. — Michael

What Happens in an Internet Minute
Via Intel:

In just one minute, more than 204 million emails are sent. Amazon rings up about $83,000 in sales. Around 20 million photos are viewed and 3,000 uploaded on Flickr. At least 6 million Facebook pages are viewed around the world. And more than 61,000 hours of music are played on Pandora while more than 1.3 million video clips are watched on YouTube.

All in all, that’s 625 terabytes of information sloshing about the tubes each minute.
If we do some math that’s 878.9 petabytes per day which is a bit difficult to wrap our mind around.
But if we convert that to the universal measurement of the MP3, we get the equivalent of about 235.9 billion songs passing through the internet and mobile networks each day.

What Happens in an Internet Minute

Via Intel:

In just one minute, more than 204 million emails are sent. Amazon rings up about $83,000 in sales. Around 20 million photos are viewed and 3,000 uploaded on Flickr. At least 6 million Facebook pages are viewed around the world. And more than 61,000 hours of music are played on Pandora while more than 1.3 million video clips are watched on YouTube.

All in all, that’s 625 terabytes of information sloshing about the tubes each minute.

If we do some math that’s 878.9 petabytes per day which is a bit difficult to wrap our mind around.

But if we convert that to the universal measurement of the MP3, we get the equivalent of about 235.9 billion songs passing through the internet and mobile networks each day.

Fans of the husband and wife designer team Charles and Ray Eames who were or were not around to see their original 50 foot long, 1961 infographic chronicling the history of mathematics can now download an app version of the huge idea. Very mathy!

Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace), 1926, Fritz Kahn
Image from Information Graphics, a new book by Julius Wiedemann, that explores the history of data and visualization.
The Guardian has a few more images from the book.

Der Mensch als Industriepalast (Man as Industrial Palace), 1926, Fritz Kahn

Image from Information Graphics, a new book by Julius Wiedemann, that explores the history of data and visualization.

The Guardian has a few more images from the book.