Posts tagged Investigative Journalism

Four Ways You Can Seek Back Pay for an Unpaid Internship

Resources worth knowing about. This is part of ProPublica’s ongoing investigative series on internships, which is really fantastic and you can actually get involved with by signing up to be part of their reporting network.

A Crowdfunded Investigation of Internships
ProPublica:


Late last month, ProPublica launched a Kickstarterto cover the costs of hiring an intern to help with our internships investigation. Our intern will create a microsite on the intern economy, traveling around the country to collect interns’ stories that will supplement and enhance our more traditional watchdog reports. But to do this, we need to raise $22,000 by June 27.
Our editor-in-chief Steve Engelberg sat down with ProPublica’s community editor Blair Hickman and news application fellow Jeremy Merrill to talk about our unique approach toinvestigating the intern economy.


"Beyond the Kickstarter, from a reporting perspective and project perspective, what’s particularly noteworthy about this is we’re starting with community and we are starting with data and news applications," said Hickman about the project. "We’ve said from the get-go, we are investigating internships and we’re doing this in a very open way — which is a little bit different than our normal investigations. And because of that, we’ve gotten a ton of tips flooding in and we’re starting to do news reports off of that. But it’s starting with the crowd."



FJP: This will be fantastic. Here’s a link to the Kickstarter, and here’s a podcast about the project. Reminds us of Ross Perlin’s Intern Nation, which is a fairly interesting read.

A Crowdfunded Investigation of Internships

ProPublica:

Late last month, ProPublica launched a Kickstarterto cover the costs of hiring an intern to help with our internships investigation. Our intern will create a microsite on the intern economy, traveling around the country to collect interns’ stories that will supplement and enhance our more traditional watchdog reports. But to do this, we need to raise $22,000 by June 27.

Our editor-in-chief Steve Engelberg sat down with ProPublica’s community editor Blair Hickman and news application fellow Jeremy Merrill to talk about our unique approach toinvestigating the intern economy.

"Beyond the Kickstarter, from a reporting perspective and project perspective, what’s particularly noteworthy about this is we’re starting with community and we are starting with data and news applications," said Hickman about the project. "We’ve said from the get-go, we are investigating internships and we’re doing this in a very open way — which is a little bit different than our normal investigations. And because of that, we’ve gotten a ton of tips flooding in and we’re starting to do news reports off of that. But it’s starting with the crowd."

FJP: This will be fantastic. Here’s a link to the Kickstarter, and here’s a podcast about the project. Reminds us of Ross Perlin’s Intern Nation, which is a fairly interesting read.

Blowing up the Death Star: An Inside Job

An examination of some questionable events and circumstances leading up to the destruction of the Death Star, through the eyes of an amateur investigative journalist within the Star Wars galaxy. The focus is mainly on the connections between the people who created and operated the Death Star and those responsible for destroying it. — Graham Putnum

Honolulu’s Civil Beat is a new, public affairs investigative journalism group. Here’s a neat quote by one of their reporters, Chad Blair:

You know, the executive, the legislative, and the judicial branches of government — journalism is that forth estate that has been around since the beginning of our democracy.

FJP: Journalism… the beach… aaah.

The Center for Investigative Reporting makes color book journalism for kids
There’s been a lot of talk lately about making journalism for different groups of people. Or at least that’s what I overhear. And that’s just what California Watch, a project of CIR, is doing:

It all started with an off-the-wall idea in an editorial meeting. While California Watch articles are written for adults, we recognize that oftentimes children are those most affected by the stories we report.
That’s exactly the case when it comes to our series on seismic safety oversight in the state’s K–12 schools. Thousands of children attend class each day in buildings or schools that have not received final safety certifications from the state’s chief building regulator. Some schools are located close to fault lines or within liquefaction zones.

The article talks a lot about the need for peripheral-reporting, or aiming stories at groups who aren’t, for whatever reason, reading or listening:

One Chinese school director called the books “urgently needed”; a Vietnamese reader said this would be the first time her mother had access to preparedness materials in a language she could understand.

The coloring book is the furthest along of a few ideas that CIR is working on. Another, due to launch this summer, is a YouTube channel that will curate investigative reporting video from the professional journalism world and, very importantly, the unnoticed-but-deserving clan of people who do it but aren’t “professional” yet.

The Center for Investigative Reporting makes color book journalism for kids

There’s been a lot of talk lately about making journalism for different groups of people. Or at least that’s what I overhear. And that’s just what California Watch, a project of CIR, is doing:

It all started with an off-the-wall idea in an editorial meeting. While California Watch articles are written for adults, we recognize that oftentimes children are those most affected by the stories we report.

That’s exactly the case when it comes to our series on seismic safety oversight in the state’s K–12 schools. Thousands of children attend class each day in buildings or schools that have not received final safety certifications from the state’s chief building regulator. Some schools are located close to fault lines or within liquefaction zones.

The article talks a lot about the need for peripheral-reporting, or aiming stories at groups who aren’t, for whatever reason, reading or listening:

One Chinese school director called the books “urgently needed”; a Vietnamese reader said this would be the first time her mother had access to preparedness materials in a language she could understand.

The coloring book is the furthest along of a few ideas that CIR is working on. Another, due to launch this summer, is a YouTube channel that will curate investigative reporting video from the professional journalism world and, very importantly, the unnoticed-but-deserving clan of people who do it but aren’t “professional” yet.

The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) to launch investigative news channel on YouTube, with Knight support

The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) announced today it will launch a new investigative news channel on YouTube that will be a hub of investigative journalism, with $800,000 in support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

CIR, the non-profit investigative reporting organization that has produced numerous award-winning investigations, will curate the YouTube channel, which is expected to launch in July 2012. Journalists will be trained in audience engagement and other best practices for online video. The Investigative News Network (INN) will also be responsible for working with its member organizations to leverage the channel to reach new audiences and increase the amount of earned revenue to subsidize their public interest journalism.

CNN takes on slavery using InDesign
In a really cool departure from what they normally do, CNN has just released an online article filled with slideshows, videos and sidebars focusing on slavery in the African country of Mauritania. Made in the interactive document-making program Adobe InDesign, the article looks more like a PDF than the usual CNN article we’re used to.
H/T: Nieman Lab

CNN takes on slavery using InDesign

In a really cool departure from what they normally do, CNN has just released an online article filled with slideshows, videos and sidebars focusing on slavery in the African country of Mauritania. Made in the interactive document-making program Adobe InDesign, the article looks more like a PDF than the usual CNN article we’re used to.

H/T: Nieman Lab

Does Longform Journalism Fit Your News Diet?

WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show brought on ProPublica managing editor Steve Engelberg and Frontline’s Raney Aronson to explore longform journalism, and whether we have the patience, attention span and appetite for it.

Audience aside, can longform, investigative journalism be sustainable when a single story can cost anywhere from $50,000 to a half million dollars.

Listen on WNYC or download the MP3 here.

Run Time: 33 minutes (hey, it’s longform).

As [whistleblowing] sites multiply, they will still need to deal with the challenges that Wikileaks and Cryptome have faced. They will need to find ways to effectively protect the identities of their sources, provide an adequate media platform, earn the trust of whistleblowers, weed out fabricated leaks, and avoid the wrath of corporations and governments. However, one thing is clear: the strong demand by readers and the media will make anonymous whistleblowing websites a permanent fixture in the future of investigative journalism. Cutting off services to one popular whistleblowing website will never be enough to keep truthful political information off the Internet.
Because of the range of the material and the very nature of diplomacy, the embassy cables were bound to be more explosive than the War Logs. Dean Baquet, our Washington bureau chief, gave the White House an early warning on Nov. 19. The following Tuesday, two days before Thanksgiving, Baquet and two colleagues were invited to a windowless room at the State Department, where they encountered an unsmiling crowd. Representatives from the White House, the State Department, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the C.I.A., the Defense Intelligence Agency, the F.B.I. and the Pentagon gathered around a conference table. Others, who never identified themselves, lined the walls. A solitary note-taker tapped away on a computer.
Bill Keller, Executive Editor, New York Times, recounting the newspaper’s first meeting with the US government in the days leading up to the publication of the WikiLeaks diplomatic cables.
Investigative reporters in 2011 not only need to know all the basics, including how to crunch data, they also need to know how to tap into the crowd for information, funding and access to public and private sector documents. Imagine a Julian Assange in every state and major city in the US.
Joe Bergantino, Director/Senior Investigative Reporter for the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, in response to a group Q&A conducted by the Poynter Institute.

On the social web, investigative journalists are tapping citizens to take part in the process by scouring documents and doing shoe-leather reporting in the community. This is advantageous because readers often know more than journalists do about a given subject, said Jay Rosen, a journalism professor at New York University.

“That was always the case, but with the tools that we have today, that knowledge can start flowing in at relatively low cost and with relatively few headaches,” Rosen said. Rosen admits that we are just starting to learn how to do this effectively, but there are certainly some great experiments being done.

Talking Points Memo Muckraker had success with this approach by having its readers help sort through thousands of documents pertaining to the investigation of the U.S. Department of Justice’s controversial firing of seven United States attorneys in 2006. TPM provided clear instructions to its readers to cite specific documents that included something interesting or “damning.”…

…A similar example on a grander scale is that of The Guardian deploying its community to help dig through 458,832 members of parliament (MP’s) expense documents. They’ve already examined roughly half of those, thanks to the 27,270 people who participated. The Guardian rewarded community participants by creating a leader board based on the quantity and quality of their contributions and also highlighting some of the great finds by its members.

Vadim Lavrusik, Mashable
There’s what we know, what we think we know and what we can publish. You try to get the first and second categories into the third category.

Gene Warnick, sports editor, Los Angeles Daily News, on investigative journalism (via calebbenoit1)

Otherwise known as Rumsfeldian media analysis.

Bob Woodward discusses 21st Century investigative journalism.

Run Time: ~60 minutes.