posts about or somewhat related to ‘Japan Earthquake’


The New York Times’ share of total page views to newspaper websites dropped by its largest margin in more than a year in April, the first full month that it had its paywall up. ComScore data shows that the NYT‘s share of newspaper website traffic was 10.6 percent last month, down from 13 percent in March and 13.5 percent in May 2010.

PaidContent had previously reported that Times execs saw the traffic drop-off as less severe than expected, bu it won’t be easy for The New York Times to put a positive spin on such a hasty decline. Lets consider the rapid succession of highly mediated events that have taken place since the wall went up: The Japan Earthquake, The Libyan Civil War, the near-shutdown of the federal government, the Royal Wedding, killer tornadoes in the South, and the death of Osama bin Laden, to name a few. 
Although the Japanese earthquake itself occurred on March 11, the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima-Daichi plant was still in a critical phase after one week. Irrespective of this single event, the number of natural disasters, international conflicts and other news making events have been boosting ratings of publishers such as CNN and Fox, as Mediaite reported.
As a non-subscriber to the Times, I constantly consider whether reading a new article on the site will put me over my month. For screaming headlines, and quick news bites, I instead go to The Huffington Post, one of many destinations I know will be carrying national and international news. 

The New York Times’ share of total page views to newspaper websites dropped by its largest margin in more than a year in April, the first full month that it had its paywall up. ComScore data shows that the NYT‘s share of newspaper website traffic was 10.6 percent last month, down from 13 percent in March and 13.5 percent in May 2010.

PaidContent had previously reported that Times execs saw the traffic drop-off as less severe than expected, bu it won’t be easy for The New York Times to put a positive spin on such a hasty decline. Lets consider the rapid succession of highly mediated events that have taken place since the wall went up: The Japan Earthquake, The Libyan Civil War, the near-shutdown of the federal government, the Royal Wedding, killer tornadoes in the South, and the death of Osama bin Laden, to name a few. 

Although the Japanese earthquake itself occurred on March 11, the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima-Daichi plant was still in a critical phase after one week. Irrespective of this single event, the number of natural disasters, international conflicts and other news making events have been boosting ratings of publishers such as CNN and Fox, as Mediaite reported.

As a non-subscriber to the Times, I constantly consider whether reading a new article on the site will put me over my month. For screaming headlines, and quick news bites, I instead go to The Huffington Post, one of many destinations I know will be carrying national and international news. 


CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta near the epicenter of earthquake that devastated Japan Mar. 11, 2011.

Propelled by revolution in the Middle East and radiation in Japan, television news coverage of foreign events this year is at the highest level since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 10 years ago, news executives in the United States say.


The foreign press corps is working in exceptionally dangerous conditions in countries like Japan, where members carry radiation monitors on assignment, and in Libya, where crews of journalists have been detained. “We’ve had a year’s worth of international breaking news, and we’re only halfway through March,” said Tony Maddox, the executive vice president and managing director at CNN International, where anchors spoke on Saturday of being “live on five continents.”
The coverage exposes just how much reporting of foreign news has changed in the past decade, through cuts at news outlets and through the contributions of the Internet and other new technologies. Fewer journalists covering foreign news work full time for American broadcast networks than once did, and those who remain have had to hopscotch from one hot spot to another this year, sometimes creating lags in coverage.

(Image: Getty for CNN via NY Times)

CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta near the epicenter of earthquake that devastated Japan Mar. 11, 2011.

Propelled by revolution in the Middle East and radiation in Japan, television news coverage of foreign events this year is at the highest level since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 10 years ago, news executives in the United States say.

The foreign press corps is working in exceptionally dangerous conditions in countries like Japan, where members carry radiation monitors on assignment, and in Libya, where crews of journalists have been detained. “We’ve had a year’s worth of international breaking news, and we’re only halfway through March,” said Tony Maddox, the executive vice president and managing director at CNN International, where anchors spoke on Saturday of being “live on five continents.”

The coverage exposes just how much reporting of foreign news has changed in the past decade, through cuts at news outlets and through the contributions of the Internet and other new technologies. Fewer journalists covering foreign news work full time for American broadcast networks than once did, and those who remain have had to hopscotch from one hot spot to another this year, sometimes creating lags in coverage.

(Image: Getty for CNN via NY Times)

shortformblog:

Fukushima now has its own unmanned remote-controlled mascot
This little guy right here? He’s a T-Hawk drone, a little unmanned remote-controlled flying thingamajig, built by Honeywell, that engineers used to get an up-close view of the situation inside the damaged Fukushima reactors. It can shoot both normal pictures as well as infrared shots. Plus, if you own one of these, you’ll be the coolest kid on your block. Engineers say that they’ll have some photos to share with the world on Monday. But we want them now! source
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shortformblog:

This little guy right here? He’s a T-Hawk drone, a little unmanned remote-controlled flying thingamajig, built by Honeywell, that engineers used to get an up-close view of the situation inside the damaged Fukushima reactors. It can shoot both normal pictures as well as infrared shots. Plus, if you own one of these, you’ll be the coolest kid on your block. Engineers say that they’ll have some photos to share with the world on Monday. But we want them now! source

Follow ShortFormBlog

(Source: shortformblog)

kateoplis:

75-year-old Kunio Shiga listens to a battery-powered radio in the living room of his cold, darkened home inside the deserted evacuation zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex. The farmhouse sits about 500 yards down a mud-caked one-lane road strewn with felled trees, the carcasses of pigs and debris. He cannot walk very far, his wife is missing and he is scared and disoriented. “You are the first people I have spoken to” since the tsunami, he tells the AP.

kateoplis:

75-year-old Kunio Shiga listens to a battery-powered radio in the living room of his cold, darkened home inside the deserted evacuation zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex. The farmhouse sits about 500 yards down a mud-caked one-lane road strewn with felled trees, the carcasses of pigs and debris. He cannot walk very far, his wife is missing and he is scared and disoriented. “You are the first people I have spoken to” since the tsunami, he tells the AP.

From the Google Lat Long Blog:

Today, we’ve published imagery of the Sendai region at even higher resolution, which we collected on Sunday and Monday. The new Sendai imagery, along with satellite imagery from throughout the area, is now live in the base imagery layer of Google Earth and will soon be visible in Google Maps. We hope to continue collecting updated images and publishing them as soon as they are ready.We hope our effort to deliver up-to-date imagery provides the relief organizations and volunteers working around the clock with the data they need to better understand the current conditions on the ground. We also hope these tools help our millions of users—both those in Japan and those closely watching and sending their support from all over the globe—to find useful information about the affected areas.

From the Google Lat Long Blog:

Today, we’ve published imagery of the Sendai region at even higher resolution, which we collected on Sunday and Monday. The new Sendai imagery, along with satellite imagery from throughout the area, is now live in the base imagery layer of Google Earth and will soon be visible in Google Maps. We hope to continue collecting updated images and publishing them as soon as they are ready.

We hope our effort to deliver up-to-date imagery provides the relief organizations and volunteers working around the clock with the data they need to better understand the current conditions on the ground. We also hope these tools help our millions of users—both those in Japan and those closely watching and sending their support from all over the globe—to find useful information about the affected areas.

The estimated damage from Japan’s combined earthquake and tsunami make it the world’s most expensive natural disaster since 1965. The world’s second most costly natural disaster also took place in Japan, the 1995 Kobe Earthquake, whose losses totaled nearly 2 percent of the country’s GDP, according to this graphic compiled by The Economist. 

The estimated damage from Japan’s combined earthquake and tsunami make it the world’s most expensive natural disaster since 1965. The world’s second most costly natural disaster also took place in Japan, the 1995 Kobe Earthquake, whose losses totaled nearly 2 percent of the country’s GDP, according to this graphic compiled by The Economist.