Posts tagged with ‘Kickstarter’

What’s it Like to Be Dyslexic?

UK-based designer Sam Barclay is concluding a successful Kickstarter campaign to create a design and typography book that shows what it’s like to be dyslexic.

Via the Daily Mail.

According to Barclay, people with dyslexia and other reading difficulties are often capable of thinking in ways others aren’t and as a result are ‘capable of true greatness’, yet these people are often misunderstood and treated unfairly as a result.

‘Being dyslexic, I noticed that available help was always about making me read better,’ said Barclay.

Very little effort was made to help the people around me understand what it feels like.

The book continues a project Barklay created while at the University of Portsmouth that explores the “struggles a dyslexic person might have while reading.”

As Medical Daily explains, the typography book builds empathy with those who don’t — or can’t — understand how the dyslexic see the written world. “It’s near impossible, for instance, to look at a word in your native tongue and not read it, to just look at the symbols, estranged from their meaning. Once we learn to read, our brains forget what it’s like not to associate symbols with letters. It’s for this reason, Barclay says, that his book is so vital to uplifting and enlarging dyslexia to people worldwide.”

Images: Pages from I Wonder What It’s Like to Be Dyslexic, by Sam Barclay via Kickstarter. Select to embiggen.

The Newest Hottest Spike Lee Joint

The famous Spike Lee has enlisted the world to fund his next film via Kickstarter for a cool $1.25 million. Lee then calls himself an independent filmmaker and almost gets down on his knees to beg you for your money (although Celebrity Net Worth calculates his net worth at $40 million). He provides his body of work as proof that the film will prosper, and promises lots of sex on screen.

As Film School Rejects puts it:

For Spike Lee fans, this is a dream come true. […] For non-Lee fans, well, this is just one more way not to spend your money.

FJP: We’re not sure if the public at large is being taken advantage by the latest trend of celebrity crowd-funding, but the Kickstarter ends August 21 if you want to donate. You’ll still have to pay to see the movie when it’s done though.—Gabbi

Video: Kickstarter (Runtime- 3:14)

57 Hours Left to Fund a Very Excellent Journalism Project

The FJP’s very own Blake Hunsicker, who is currently a Master’s student in NYU’s Studio 20 program, is doing a pretty incredible reporting project on Syrian refugees in Lebanon that he needs to raise money for. In tandem with Syria Deeply, an incredible journalism project that we’ve written about before, here’s his plan:

This is a experiment in explanatory journalism. The final product will be a webpage filled with short videos you can watch in any order, designed to help introduce people to the humanitarian crisis in Syria and its neighboring countries.

I will do my principal reporting during a two week trip to Lebanon in August. I plan to interview Syrian refugees on camera across the country — in Beirut apartments, borderland villages and the tense northern towns near Tripoli. I’ll ask them questions that will interest an unfamiliar audience, questions I haven’t heard asked before — about their lives before the war, what they were looking forward to, and what they’d be doing now if there was no conflict. 

Read more about it on his Kickstarter, and help us help him reach his funding goal by Monday. Also visit Syria Deeply to learn more about what’s going on, and why Blake’s work is so important. 

Let’s Send Blake to Lebanon!

The FJP’s very own Blake Hunsicker, who is currently a Master’s student in NYU’s Studio 20 program, is doing a pretty incredible reporting project on Syrian refugees in Lebanon that he needs to raise money for. In tandem with Syria Deeply, an incredible journalism project that we’ve written about before, here’s his plan:

This is a experiment in explanatory journalism. The final product will be a webpage filled with short videos you can watch in any order, designed to help introduce people to the humanitarian crisis in Syria and its neighboring countries.

I will do my principal reporting during a two week trip to Lebanon in August. I plan to interview Syrian refugees on camera across the country — in Beirut apartments, borderland villages and the tense northern towns near Tripoli. I’ll ask them questions that will interest an unfamiliar audience, questions I haven’t heard asked before — about their lives before the war, what they were looking forward to, and what they’d be doing now if there was no conflict. 

Read more about it on his Kickstarter, and help us help him reach his funding goal by July 22. Also visit Syria Deeply to learn more about what’s going on, and why Blake’s work is so important. As he told me yesterday:

This war has affected the lives of millions of people and yet a lot of the news coverage is on Obama vs. Putin, or the gruesome stuff, or groups tied to Al-Qaeda, or Hezbollah and Iran. That doesn’t inspire anyone to care about what’s going on there unless they’re into it already. There’s no reason why people like us in the West would be necessarily uninterested in what’s happened to these people, we just lack the good storytelling to draw us in.

Asteroid Mining Company Makes Space Telescope Accessible To Public
Asteroid mining company, Planetary Resources, has acquired their goal of a million dollars from Kickstarter to fund Arkyd, a space telescope that allows ordinary people to snap selfies and other images of space. If you donate $25, you’ll get a photo of yourself displayed on the onboard screen and then receive a digital picture of your face in space (it gets pricier if you want an actual print). You can also point the telescope anywhere you want to snap your own pictures of the great beyond. 
According to Mashable, the Arkyd’s true mission isn’t to make space snapshots popular in social media, but to discover and dismember asteroids that contain trillions of dollars worth of minerals like platinum and gold. At a space conference in 2006, co-founder of Planetary Resources Peter Diamandis said, “There are $20 trillion checks up there waiting to be cashed.” 
FJP: So why not help Diamandis cash in early with some space-selfie fees? Cha-ching. - Krissy
Image: Mashable

Asteroid Mining Company Makes Space Telescope Accessible To Public

Asteroid mining company, Planetary Resources, has acquired their goal of a million dollars from Kickstarter to fund Arkyd, a space telescope that allows ordinary people to snap selfies and other images of space. If you donate $25, you’ll get a photo of yourself displayed on the onboard screen and then receive a digital picture of your face in space (it gets pricier if you want an actual print). You can also point the telescope anywhere you want to snap your own pictures of the great beyond. 

According to Mashable, the Arkyd’s true mission isn’t to make space snapshots popular in social media, but to discover and dismember asteroids that contain trillions of dollars worth of minerals like platinum and gold. At a space conference in 2006, co-founder of Planetary Resources Peter Diamandis said, “There are $20 trillion checks up there waiting to be cashed.” 

FJP: So why not help Diamandis cash in early with some space-selfie fees? Cha-ching. - Krissy

Image: Mashable

A Crowdfunded Investigation of Internships
ProPublica:


Late last month, ProPublica launched a Kickstarterto cover the costs of hiring an intern to help with our internships investigation. Our intern will create a microsite on the intern economy, traveling around the country to collect interns’ stories that will supplement and enhance our more traditional watchdog reports. But to do this, we need to raise $22,000 by June 27.
Our editor-in-chief Steve Engelberg sat down with ProPublica’s community editor Blair Hickman and news application fellow Jeremy Merrill to talk about our unique approach toinvestigating the intern economy.


"Beyond the Kickstarter, from a reporting perspective and project perspective, what’s particularly noteworthy about this is we’re starting with community and we are starting with data and news applications," said Hickman about the project. "We’ve said from the get-go, we are investigating internships and we’re doing this in a very open way — which is a little bit different than our normal investigations. And because of that, we’ve gotten a ton of tips flooding in and we’re starting to do news reports off of that. But it’s starting with the crowd."



FJP: This will be fantastic. Here’s a link to the Kickstarter, and here’s a podcast about the project. Reminds us of Ross Perlin’s Intern Nation, which is a fairly interesting read.

A Crowdfunded Investigation of Internships

ProPublica:

Late last month, ProPublica launched a Kickstarterto cover the costs of hiring an intern to help with our internships investigation. Our intern will create a microsite on the intern economy, traveling around the country to collect interns’ stories that will supplement and enhance our more traditional watchdog reports. But to do this, we need to raise $22,000 by June 27.

Our editor-in-chief Steve Engelberg sat down with ProPublica’s community editor Blair Hickman and news application fellow Jeremy Merrill to talk about our unique approach toinvestigating the intern economy.

"Beyond the Kickstarter, from a reporting perspective and project perspective, what’s particularly noteworthy about this is we’re starting with community and we are starting with data and news applications," said Hickman about the project. "We’ve said from the get-go, we are investigating internships and we’re doing this in a very open way — which is a little bit different than our normal investigations. And because of that, we’ve gotten a ton of tips flooding in and we’re starting to do news reports off of that. But it’s starting with the crowd."

FJP: This will be fantastic. Here’s a link to the Kickstarter, and here’s a podcast about the project. Reminds us of Ross Perlin’s Intern Nation, which is a fairly interesting read.

Selling Data, Taking Things in Your Hands Edition
A common truism says that if it’s free and on the Web, you’re not the customer but the product being sold. Also common is the following reaction: what can I do about that. The less common reaction: How can I get in on that?
Try this one on as a thought experiment.
Via Slate:

In a world of privacy-invading smartphone apps and government-grade spyware, keeping personal data personal online can seem like a difficult task. But could you make money by choosing to give away logs of your most intimate data?
Federico Zannier is trying to find out. Emails, chat logs, location data, browser history, screenshots—you name it, the New York-based software developer is selling it all.With a Kickstarter campaign launched earlier this month, Zannier, a 28-year-old Italian-born master’s student at NYU, is offering to hand over a day’s digital footprint for a measly $2. He says he “violated his own privacy” starting back in February for about 50 days straight, recording screenshots and webcam snaps of himself every 30 seconds and tracking his every footstep using GPS technology. He logged the address of each Web page he visited—storing some 3 million lines of text—and accumulated a massive trove of 21,124 webcam photos and 19,920 screen shots.
Zannier’s aim, somewhat paradoxically, is to take ownership of his own data by selling it. He points out that we often hand over our private data unwittingly, given that few people take the time to read the terms and conditions of apps and online services. Companies rake in millions of dollars selling our information to marketing firms while we receive little in return. But Zannier’s Kickstarter is not just out to make a statement about online privacy—he plans to use the funds to create a browser extension and a smartphone app that he says will help others sell their own data. “If more people do the same, I’m thinking marketers could just pay us directly for our data,” he writes on his Kickstarter page. “It might sound crazy, but so is giving all our data away for free.”

So, just as the Web often disrupts, let’s cut out the middle man.
Image: It’s Free, But They Sell Your Information, via Telco 2.0.

Selling Data, Taking Things in Your Hands Edition

A common truism says that if it’s free and on the Web, you’re not the customer but the product being sold. Also common is the following reaction: what can I do about that. The less common reaction: How can I get in on that?

Try this one on as a thought experiment.

Via Slate:

In a world of privacy-invading smartphone apps and government-grade spyware, keeping personal data personal online can seem like a difficult task. But could you make money by choosing to give away logs of your most intimate data?

Federico Zannier is trying to find out. Emails, chat logs, location data, browser history, screenshots—you name it, the New York-based software developer is selling it all.With a Kickstarter campaign launched earlier this month, Zannier, a 28-year-old Italian-born master’s student at NYU, is offering to hand over a day’s digital footprint for a measly $2. He says he “violated his own privacy” starting back in February for about 50 days straight, recording screenshots and webcam snaps of himself every 30 seconds and tracking his every footstep using GPS technology. He logged the address of each Web page he visited—storing some 3 million lines of text—and accumulated a massive trove of 21,124 webcam photos and 19,920 screen shots.

Zannier’s aim, somewhat paradoxically, is to take ownership of his own data by selling it. He points out that we often hand over our private data unwittingly, given that few people take the time to read the terms and conditions of apps and online services. Companies rake in millions of dollars selling our information to marketing firms while we receive little in return. But Zannier’s Kickstarter is not just out to make a statement about online privacy—he plans to use the funds to create a browser extension and a smartphone app that he says will help others sell their own data. “If more people do the same, I’m thinking marketers could just pay us directly for our data,” he writes on his Kickstarter page. “It might sound crazy, but so is giving all our data away for free.”

So, just as the Web often disrupts, let’s cut out the middle man.

Image: It’s Free, But They Sell Your Information, via Telco 2.0.

Loud Silence

Loud Silence in an innovative approach to video journalism made by local people for Africans and an international community. The days of boring news talk shows and static documentaries are over, as we take stories directly from the streets. — Kevin Taylor, Co-Founder, Loud Silence Media.

Loud Silence, a group of Ghanian documentarians, has begun a Kickstarter campaign to help continue telling stories throughout Ghana. 

Here’s some of what they’ve done:

Recently, we have produced pieces on illegal gold mining; discrimination (and murders) against the disabled; amputee football; homes that flood during any rain; waste management and kids who pick through trash for a living; affects of the new oil industry in Ghana; turning garbage into energy; cyber-scammers, and controversial elections and political stories.

Take a look at their Kickstarter and the trailer they’ve created. It’s a good demonstration of the quality and subject matter of their work, and what they’re trying to accomplish within the Ghanian media environment.

FJP: Getting behind local, independent media is important and it would be fantastic to push them well beyond their $12,000 goal.

You can also learn more about them and view their work on their Web site.

Images: Selected stills from the Loud Silence Web site.

How to Raise Funds (by Getting Your Giver to Enjoy Giving)

People give more when they are having fun, or are able to access the joy of giving you funds to do your thing. Charities tap into this by telling stories (because naturally, people are more interested in investing in a story they can be a part of), or by creating events and programs that are fun to participate in so that even people who aren’t directly connected to the “cause” want to participate. 

All that is covered in the above video of Peter Sagal (host of the NPR game show “Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me!”) as part of The Chronicle of Philanthropy’s ideas and advice on raising money.

FJP: I’ve always been on the fence about raising money for serious causes by hosting (silly and/or alcohol based) events. It works, sure, and I’ve been to and donated at plenty of such events. But there’s always been some sort of unidentifiable moral hiccup in the idea that’s made me uncomfortable. Sagal’s point about connecting donors to (hopefully) a success story they can witness, however, makes a lot of sense. It’s partially why things like Kickstarter work. 

Which leads to this TED Talk by Katherine Fulton on crowd-driven philanthropy, the extracted thought being that collaboration is an investment in both fun and experience. Which, in many ways, is where journalism is at, and where its going.

Philanthropy teaches us that people give (time, money or attention) when they are having fun (like, for example, on BuzzFeed) or when they get to vicariously experience success and get some sort of credit for it (see: the FJP’s crowdfunding archives). 

It’s not a new thought. But it’s a pretty good truth to keep in one’s pocket when thinking about the future of journalism. —Jihii

Kickstarting the Death Star →

Via Kickstarter:

In November 2012 the people asked for a death star. The government said NO!

In light of continuing threats we should build it ourselves.

Initial design (not for kids)Initial design (not for kids)

Goal

£20,000,000 for more detailed plans and enough chicken wire to protect reactor exhaust ports.

Stretch Goal

£543,000,000,000,000,00 ($850,000,000,000,000,000) to secure full funding for actual construction.

Open Source

To keep costs lower the entire project will use open source hardware and software.

FJP: Make it so.

Best of Kickstarter 2012

With over 2.2 million people in 172 countries backing projects to the tune of $606 per minute, Kickstarter takes a look back at 2012.

Images: Selected stills, Best of Kickstarter 2012. Select to embiggen.

Before you start a Kickstarter campaign, you better have a long list of people to tell about it. Otherwise, unless you’re lucky enough to have Kickstarter put your project on its homepage, few will even know it exists.

How to make your journalism project succeed on Kickstarter » Nieman Journalism Lab

Looking to fund your next journalism project? Nieman Lab talks with Chris Amico, co-founder of Homicide Watch, about how to create a successful campaign on Kickstarter and the importance of a broader funding strategy to see a project through to completion. The article offers a number of tips and looks at a range of projects, including those that had been funded and those that did not reach their goal (plus a few journalism projects that far exceeded their goals).

(via onaissues)

(via onaissues)

The Kickstarter Chronicles →

CJR:

Pitching media projects to this online community brings another meaning to the concept “public interest journalism”; success depends on how intrigued people are by the pitch. From the hugely popular to the barely noticed, CJR’s Kickstarter Chronicles is a look through some of these journalistic proposals.

1. The Enthusiast

“A bazillion internet years” (or eight human years) ago this week, Josh Fruhlinger thought a daily blog of criticism and commentary about newspaper comics would be a good way to keep his writing skills sharp.The Comics Curmudgeontook off, allowing Fruhlinger to quit his tech editor job and focus on his freelance career, writing for outlets such as Wonkette, The Awl, and ITWorld.

Now he’s giving fiction a go, with his first novel, The Enthusiast.

Fruhlinger says the money raised will bridge some of the gaps between self-publishing and the traditional model, paying for an editor, a designer, and upfront book costs. The rest will be used as a sort of advance, allowing Fruhlinger to turn down freelance gigs and dedicate as much time as possible to writing his novel. Though he’s already hit his goal, he welcomes additional pledges, which he’ll use to market the book and commission an illustrator - possibly comic strip panels drawn by the some of the comic strip artists whose work inspired him eight years ago.

2. Local: A Quarterly of People and Places

Daniel Webster (no, not that Daniel Webster) recalls sitting on the banks of the Susquehanna River and wondering what to do with his recently-acquired MFA in creative writing. An idea he had years ago resurfaced: a magazine that explored one small town per issue. It’s called Local: A Quarterly of People and Places, and for its first issue, the focus is on Jersey Shore. No, not that Jersey Shore. This one is in Pennsylvania, home of infamous bootleggers, an old pajama factory, an alternate Declaration of Independence, and a historical society that counts among its collection a crown made out of human hair. 

Webster says a successful campaign will enable his team to produce their first issue which, he hopes, will bring enough advertisers, subscribers, and bookstore buyers on board to keep Local going. 

Read on for more details and to see their videos.

It’s great to see how digital media is helping to keep analog publishing strong. Makeshift Magazine, which launches on Sept. 30, takes a global look at hands-on creativity, and people who improvise out of necessity. With 18 days left on the Kickstarter, the project is massively over-subscribed, with 329 backers pledging $26,000 thus far.  

(Source: kickstarter.com)