Posts tagged Libya

Arab school textbooks rewritten after regime changes - FT.com

While school curriculums in the Middle East and North Africa have long emphasized allegiance to a version of history promoting militaristic Arab nationalism, small steps are being taken to diversify perspectives represented in textbooks and classrooms since the regime changes of the last few years. Financial Times’ Borzou Daragahi reports that in Libya, for example, the parliament has recently allowed the option of studying the country’s minority languages, Amazigh, Tabu and Tuareg, in school. And in Egypt, the story of Khaled Saeed (the Egyptian computer programmer whose death sparked protests, a social media movement against torture, and the subsequent Egyptian revolution) is being taught to Egyptian second-graders. How long this will last is unknown, because of pushback from Egypt’s security forces. It’s an incredibly complicated reformation movement: read more about it here.

Somewhat Related: A 2011 Carnegie Endowment report discusses what education for empowered citizenship in the Arab World could and should look like, and what challenges such a model faces.

Photographing a Revolution with an iPhone
Pretty self explanatory, but very good work: all of these photos were taken by photojournalist Benjamin Lowy last summer, before the rebels killed Gaddafi and long before the recent attacks on the US Embassy. See the rest here.
From Mother Jones:

Why didn’t he work with fancier gear? “Small mobile phone cameras are innocuous and enable a far greater intimacy with a subject,” Lowy says, noting that Libyans themselves have also done much to document their surroundings, thanks to the ubiquitous technology.

Photographing a Revolution with an iPhone

Pretty self explanatory, but very good work: all of these photos were taken by photojournalist Benjamin Lowy last summer, before the rebels killed Gaddafi and long before the recent attacks on the US Embassy. See the rest here.

From Mother Jones:

Why didn’t he work with fancier gear? “Small mobile phone cameras are innocuous and enable a far greater intimacy with a subject,” Lowy says, noting that Libyans themselves have also done much to document their surroundings, thanks to the ubiquitous technology.

CNN Shares Ambassador Stevens Personal Journal

Last night I was watching CNN and Anderson Cooper said something that made me think, “Did he just say what I think he said?!”. The transcript is as follows:

On Wednesday of this week, we reported that a source familiar with Ambassador Stevens’ thinking said in the months before his death, Ambassador Stevens talked about being worried about what he called the never-ending security threats in Benghazi.

We also reported that the ambassador specifically mentioned the rise in Islamic extremism, the growing Al Qaeda presence in Libya and said he was on an Al Qaeda hit list. The information for that report, like all of CNN’s reporting, was carefully vetted. Some of that information was found in a personal journal of Ambassador Stevens in his handwriting.

We came upon the journal through our reporting and notified the family. At their request, we returned that journal to them. We reported what we found newsworthy in the ambassador’s writings. A reporter followed up on what we found newsworthy, as I said, in the ambassador’s writings.

I wrote my brother, Michael, the following:

if i just heard Anderson Cooper correctly, on his show, talking about libya, he cited that Christopher Stevens had security fears. Then AC said one of the CNN sources for Christopher Stevens thinking prior to his death was his personal journal, found by CNN, evidently read through, and then returned to the family. AC kept making it clear that they’re only reporting things that are “newsworthy” from the personal journal they found of a dead man. Still, WTF?? it’s ok to read through the dudes journal, and then report on what it said, but only “newsworthy” things found in it??? and then returned to the family, so all is ok for reading the dead guys journal that they found at the site and sharing with their audience.

Behind this link is the Los Angeles Times' front page, which features a graphic photo of recently-deceased U.S. ambassador Christopher Stevens. The page drew strong reaction from readers. Should they have run it?

shortformblog:

For what it’s worth: The New York Times’ new public editor, Margaret Sullivan, asked the question Wednesday after the Times ran the photo online. She decided it was worth running, but said this: “I would not want to see a similar photograph on the front page of Thursday’s print edition, where its prominence and permanence would give it a different weight.” The New York Times did not run it on its front page Thursday morning, but other papers did.

For several years now there has been an escalation of printing photos of people either in their final moments or just after death. Is the shock of the moment warranted a place as “newsworthy” or is the shock value likely to turn people further away from print media?

If you can’t find a moment’s privacy in death, what chance do you have on holiday in Provence?

humanrightswatch:

US: Torture and Rendition to Gaddafi’s Libya
A file folder found after the fall of Tripoli in a building belonging to the Libyan external security services containing faxes and memos between the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Libyan Intelligence Service. You can read some of those documents here.
Not only did the US deliver Gaddafi his enemies on a silver platter but it seems the CIA tortured many of them first. The scope of Bush administration abuse appears far broader than previously acknowledged and underscores the importance of opening up a full-scale inquiry into what happened.
Read more after the jump.
© 2011 Tim Grucza

FJP: See too Wired’s coverage of this report:

It wasn’t the only box that the CIA allegedly placed him inside. Another was a tall, narrow box, less than two feet wide, with handcuffs at the top. The detainee, Mohammed Ahmed Mohammed al-Shoroeiya, says he was placed into that one with his hands elevated and suspended by the handcuffs, for a day and a half, naked, with music blasting into his ears constantly through speakers built into the box. A different detainee describes being placed into a similar box for three days and being left with no choice but to urinate and defecate on himself.
Getting shoved into those boxes was only the start of Shoroeiya’s woes. The CIA would later deliver him and at least four others into the hands of the Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, who further brutalized them for opposing his regime. Accordingly, a new Human Rights Watch report telling the stories of those detainees strips away a euphemism in the war on terrorism: how the CIA says it holds its nose and “works with” unsavory regimes.

humanrightswatch:

US: Torture and Rendition to Gaddafi’s Libya

A file folder found after the fall of Tripoli in a building belonging to the Libyan external security services containing faxes and memos between the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Libyan Intelligence Service. You can read some of those documents here.

Not only did the US deliver Gaddafi his enemies on a silver platter but it seems the CIA tortured many of them first. The scope of Bush administration abuse appears far broader than previously acknowledged and underscores the importance of opening up a full-scale inquiry into what happened.

Read more after the jump.

© 2011 Tim Grucza

FJP: See too Wired’s coverage of this report:

It wasn’t the only box that the CIA allegedly placed him inside. Another was a tall, narrow box, less than two feet wide, with handcuffs at the top. The detainee, Mohammed Ahmed Mohammed al-Shoroeiya, says he was placed into that one with his hands elevated and suspended by the handcuffs, for a day and a half, naked, with music blasting into his ears constantly through speakers built into the box. A different detainee describes being placed into a similar box for three days and being left with no choice but to urinate and defecate on himself.

Getting shoved into those boxes was only the start of Shoroeiya’s woes. The CIA would later deliver him and at least four others into the hands of the Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, who further brutalized them for opposing his regime. Accordingly, a new Human Rights Watch report telling the stories of those detainees strips away a euphemism in the war on terrorism: how the CIA says it holds its nose and “works with” unsavory regimes.

The Battle for Libya
The New York Times gathers all its Libya photography in one place with month to month slideshows.

The Battle for Libya

The New York Times gathers all its Libya photography in one place with month to month slideshows.

Via Wired: The Tech That Took Out Gadhafi

A host of technologies — from secret subs to next-gen jammers to D.I.Y. gun trucks — helped bring down a dictator in Tripoli.

Via Poynter: 

NPR senior strategist and Twitter maven Andy Carvin tweeted an astounding 1,201 times this weekend, including 879 on Sunday, according to Twittercounter.com. The flurry came as he covered the escalating Libyan revolution. At the close of Sunday, Carvin noted he “wouldn’t be surprised if this is the most I’ve tweeted in a single day since Mubarak resigned. Around 900 tweets so far. Oy.” It is at least the most in the past six months, according to Twitter Counter.

Glad someone’s doing it but that’s insane.

Via Poynter

NPR senior strategist and Twitter maven Andy Carvin tweeted an astounding 1,201 times this weekend, including 879 on Sunday, according to Twittercounter.com. The flurry came as he covered the escalating Libyan revolution. At the close of Sunday, Carvin noted he “wouldn’t be surprised if this is the most I’ve tweeted in a single day since Mubarak resigned. Around 900 tweets so far. Oy.” It is at least the most in the past six months, according to Twitter Counter.

Glad someone’s doing it but that’s insane.

In February, the Globe and Mail published a map to show Moammar Gadhafi’s influence in Africa.

In Mali, for example, Gadhafi’s money and diplomacy have helped resolve conflicts between rebels and the government.

And in Sudan, the 20,000 troop peacekeeping mission includes African Union troops that are heavily funded by Gadhafi’s Libya.

We modified the map for display here so click through to learn more.

H/T: Torie (The Political Notebook) via G+.

In February, the Globe and Mail published a map to show Moammar Gadhafi’s influence in Africa.

In Mali, for example, Gadhafi’s money and diplomacy have helped resolve conflicts between rebels and the government.

And in Sudan, the 20,000 troop peacekeeping mission includes African Union troops that are heavily funded by Gadhafi’s Libya.

We modified the map for display here so click through to learn more.

H/T: Torie (The Political Notebook) via G+.

As Libyan rebels entered Tripoli yesterday, Sky News reporter Alex Crawford appeared to be the only Western broadcast reporter on the scene.

How’d she do it? How’d she broadcast from the capital?

According to the Daily Telegraph “the astonishing footage from the streets of Tripoli was produced using an Apple Mac Pro laptop computer connected to a mini-satellite dish that was charged by a car cigarette lighter socket.”

Somewhere MacGyver is smiling.

Today’s Papers: Libya Edition.
Click to embiggen.
Covers gathered from The Newseum’s daily collection of front pages from across the US.

Today’s Papers: Libya Edition.

Click to embiggen.

Covers gathered from The Newseum’s daily collection of front pages from across the US.

That’s our media for you.
And why we welcome the Tumblrs.
Great job by the Political Notebook, ShortFormBlog and others to help us follow along.
We’re currently watching live coverage on England’s Sky News.

That’s our media for you.

And why we welcome the Tumblrs.

Great job by the Political Notebook, ShortFormBlog and others to help us follow along.

We’re currently watching live coverage on England’s Sky News.

A man walks through the rubble of the Libyan city of Misrata.
BBC News - Day in Pictures.

A man walks through the rubble of the Libyan city of Misrata.

BBC News - Day in Pictures.