Posts tagged with ‘Libya’

The morning candidate for photo of the day.
Moises Saman for The New York Times: An armed female supporter of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi chanted pro-government slogans at a demonstration on Friday in Tripoli’s central Green Square.
See also Battle for Libya, a slideshow published yesterday.

The morning candidate for photo of the day.

Moises Saman for The New York Times: An armed female supporter of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi chanted pro-government slogans at a demonstration on Friday in Tripoli’s central Green Square.

See also Battle for Libya, a slideshow published yesterday.

Nato bombs rain down on Muammar Gaddafi’s complex in Tripoli on the same day as the Libyan leader broadcast a fresh message of defiance on state TV.
Day in Pictures: June 7, 2011 via the BBC.

Nato bombs rain down on Muammar Gaddafi’s complex in Tripoli on the same day as the Libyan leader broadcast a fresh message of defiance on state TV.

Day in Pictures: June 7, 2011 via the BBC.

Via Sebastian Meyer:

I’m posting the following video to share a few of my thoughts and experiences in covering the Libyan conflict as a photographer.

The following is a video of a battle just south of Tripoli street in Misrata.  The flash at the end is an RPG fired from pro-Gaddafi forces as it whizzes in front of us before slamming into a wall nearby.

It’s fast, sudden, and brutal… Photography has a hard time capturing this aspect of time and confusion.

NPR

Some NPR coverage of photojournalist Tim Hetherington who was killed in Libya yesterday:

New York TImes journalist CJ Chivers writes about what happened and how, and gives his personal reflections on his Tumblr:

ABC News has an interview with Sebastian Junger, Hetherington’s collaborator on the Afghanistan documentary Restrepo:

Escape to Hell is billed as a collection of short stories and essays, but most readers have found it lacking even the basic ingredients of plot or content. One of the most bizarre stories is called “The Astronaut’s Suicide.” It tells the story of an astronaut who returns to Earth from a long stay in space, finds he can’t adjust to normal life, and kills himself. It’s meant to be a children’s book.

Suzanne Merkelson writing about the literary proclivities of Muammar Gaddafi and other unsavory leaders in Foreign Policy.

Bad Politics, Worse Prose: From suicidal astronauts to bestiality, you can learn a lot about what makes the world’s worst tyrants tick from the terrible books they write.


CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta near the epicenter of earthquake that devastated Japan Mar. 11, 2011.

Propelled by revolution in the Middle East and radiation in Japan, television news coverage of foreign events this year is at the highest level since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 10 years ago, news executives in the United States say.


The foreign press corps is working in exceptionally dangerous conditions in countries like Japan, where members carry radiation monitors on assignment, and in Libya, where crews of journalists have been detained. “We’ve had a year’s worth of international breaking news, and we’re only halfway through March,” said Tony Maddox, the executive vice president and managing director at CNN International, where anchors spoke on Saturday of being “live on five continents.”
The coverage exposes just how much reporting of foreign news has changed in the past decade, through cuts at news outlets and through the contributions of the Internet and other new technologies. Fewer journalists covering foreign news work full time for American broadcast networks than once did, and those who remain have had to hopscotch from one hot spot to another this year, sometimes creating lags in coverage.

(Image: Getty for CNN via NY Times)

CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta near the epicenter of earthquake that devastated Japan Mar. 11, 2011.

Propelled by revolution in the Middle East and radiation in Japan, television news coverage of foreign events this year is at the highest level since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 10 years ago, news executives in the United States say.

The foreign press corps is working in exceptionally dangerous conditions in countries like Japan, where members carry radiation monitors on assignment, and in Libya, where crews of journalists have been detained. “We’ve had a year’s worth of international breaking news, and we’re only halfway through March,” said Tony Maddox, the executive vice president and managing director at CNN International, where anchors spoke on Saturday of being “live on five continents.”

The coverage exposes just how much reporting of foreign news has changed in the past decade, through cuts at news outlets and through the contributions of the Internet and other new technologies. Fewer journalists covering foreign news work full time for American broadcast networks than once did, and those who remain have had to hopscotch from one hot spot to another this year, sometimes creating lags in coverage.

(Image: Getty for CNN via NY Times)

Reporting Libya, a Tally →

Via Committee to Protect Journalists:

CPJ has documented more than 70 attacks on the press since political unrest erupted in Libya last month. They include two fatalities, a gunshot injury, 45 detentions, 11 assaults, two attacks on news facilities, the jamming of Al-Jazeera and Al-Hurra transmissions, at least four instances of obstruction, the expulsion of two international journalists, and the interruption of Internet service. At least six local journalists are missing amid speculation they are in the custody of security forces. One media support worker is also unaccounted for.

The CPJ is keeping daily tally on reporting conditions in the country.

Tom Ashbrook

—Anthony Shadid

Tuesday’s Listen: Anthony Shadid, The New York Times

Last month Anthony Shadid was captured along with three colleagues and their driver by Libyan security forces.

In this episode of On Point with Tom Ashbrook, Shadid discusses the experience, gives insight into who the different opposition forces are in that country, and talks about his career reporting throughout North Africa and Middle East.

Run Time: 45:00 | Download (Right Click/CRTL Click)

I am worried about them. The Libyan authorities are crazy and can do whatever they want. They promised that they would set him free, but now I cannot get hold of him.

Al Jazeera journalist Sammir Shatara on the re-arrest of Norwegian photographer and journalist Ammar Al-Hamdan and three colleagues.

Al-Hamdan was orginally captured on March 7, released, and then arrested again over the weekend.

Ramona Tancau, The Foreigner, Norwegian Al-Jazeera journalist recaptured.

Watch live streaming video from columbiajournalism at livestream.com

Four New York Times journalists discuss their capture in Libya.

We went up to the Columbia Journalism School to help some students webcast the event. Now it’s available on demand. Enjoy.

With the rise of cameras such as Canon’s Mark 7 and others that shoot glorious cinematic footage, the issue of introducing “artifice” into news coverage is increasingly being debated. 

For example, this video from Libya was created by Condition One, a company started by Sundance documentary winner Danfung Dennis that markets itself as creators of “immersive experiences.”

Is it news? Is it responsible coverage? If not, what is it?

The Washington Post’s Melissa Bell takes a stab:

Rather than traditional documentary film, where the story takes precedent over the image, this style, dubbed “cinematic documentary,” cares more about the aesthetic: piecing together images without an emphasis on the larger context…

…But perhaps what is lost in context is made up for in an emotional response… The collective effect of stringing together the scenes turns images we’ve grown numb to through intense media coverage into something breathtaking. It jars us into look once again at the destruction.

In a time when we’re overwhelmed by news — so much so that a Pew Research Center study says that only 5 percent of Americans are following events in Libya “very closely,” — perhaps we need new ways to make us look closer at what’s going on around us.

Bell’s excellent article has more examples.

On March 15, four New York Times journalists were apprehended by the Libyan government. Six days later they were released.

Now back in New York, Stephen Farrell, Tyler Hicks, Lynsey Addario and Anthony Shadid share their experiences.

Run Time: 6:00.

Three Big Pigs. The Story of Arab Democracy Revolts Told Angry Birds-Style.

(Source: thenextweb.com)

Condition ONE is the conflict reporting app that makes makes watching scenes from the battlefield an immersive, gripping experience.

Condition ONE even offers something akin to augmented reality for war journalism — hold your tablet or smartphone up as a video scene is playing out onscreen, and as you pan the screen to the left or right or up or down in physical space, the perspective of the image moves to match it like an unnervingly realistic “magic window” onto a war zone.

The point of all this, though, isn’t just to wow jaded techies. “Through our work we hope to shake people from their indifference to war, and to bridge the disconnect between the realities on the ground and the public consciousness at home,” [Danfung] Dennis told DSLR News Shooter. Condition ONE doesn’t just want to put you in the action — it wants to motivate you to take action yourself. Which is what all good conflict journalism is about in the end.

The first live-fire test of Condition ONE was shot in Libya, with the aid of reporter Patrick Chauvel.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)