Posts tagged Los Angeles Times

Ray Harryhausen, Special Effects Extraordinaire, Passes Away
Ray Harryhausen, the man responsible for stop-motion animation in such films as Jason And The Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), died at 92-years-old on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.
Via Huffington Post:

Though his on-screen credit was often simply “technical effects” or “special visual effects,” Mr. Harryhausen usually played a principal creative role in the films featuring his work. He frequently proposed the initial concept, scouted the locations and shaped the story, script, art direction and design around his ideas for fresh ways to amaze an audience.

Other than Harryhausen’s impressive ability to multitask in all areas of film production, his approach to animation was unique and notable in that he didn’t want his fantasy creatures to appear real to the audience. 
Via Mashable:

Two things for those of us weaned on CGI to notice here. Firstly, although these clay models are made to seem like living, breathing creatures, Harryhausen didn’t intend to replicate reality. He was looking for that curious, nightmarish effect stop-motion can have. “If you make fantasy too real,” he said, “it loses the quality of a dream.”

FJP: Harryhausen is being called “The Master of Stop Motion,” by NPR, “A Visual Effects Guru” by The Los Angeles Times, and the “Hollywood Effects Wizard,” by USA Today. But to an ex-film-school rat who spent a good chunk of her educational years analyzing and worshipping the pioneers of sci-fi special effects — he’s nothing but LEGEND.  And through his works of creative genius, his legend will live on. - Krissy
Image: Ray Harryhausen with some of his creatures, Huffington Post

Ray Harryhausen, Special Effects Extraordinaire, Passes Away

Ray Harryhausen, the man responsible for stop-motion animation in such films as Jason And The Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), died at 92-years-old on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.

Via Huffington Post:

Though his on-screen credit was often simply “technical effects” or “special visual effects,” Mr. Harryhausen usually played a principal creative role in the films featuring his work. He frequently proposed the initial concept, scouted the locations and shaped the story, script, art direction and design around his ideas for fresh ways to amaze an audience.

Other than Harryhausen’s impressive ability to multitask in all areas of film production, his approach to animation was unique and notable in that he didn’t want his fantasy creatures to appear real to the audience. 

Via Mashable:

Two things for those of us weaned on CGI to notice here. Firstly, although these clay models are made to seem like living, breathing creatures, Harryhausen didn’t intend to replicate reality. He was looking for that curious, nightmarish effect stop-motion can have. “If you make fantasy too real,” he said, “it loses the quality of a dream.”

FJP: Harryhausen is being called “The Master of Stop Motion,” by NPR, “A Visual Effects Guru” by The Los Angeles Times, and the “Hollywood Effects Wizard,” by USA Today. But to an ex-film-school rat who spent a good chunk of her educational years analyzing and worshipping the pioneers of sci-fi special effects — he’s nothing but LEGEND.  And through his works of creative genius, his legend will live on. - Krissy

Image: Ray Harryhausen with some of his creatures, Huffington Post

This Day in Newspaper History: Los Angeles Times is Bombed
The October 1, 1910 early morning attack killed 20 and injured 100.
Via the LA Times Framework blog:

The attack didn’t stop the Oct. 1, 1910, issue of The Times; it was printed at the Los Angeles Herald.
The city of Los Angeles hired private detective William J. Burns to catch the bombers. His work led to the arrest of two brothers, John J. and James B. McNamara — members of the International Assn. of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers union.
Clarence Darrow defended the McNamaras only to lose the case when the brothers changed their pleas in open court to guilty. After the trial, Darrow was twice tried on charges of jury tampering. The first trial ended in acquittal, the second in a hung jury.

Click through for more images.

This Day in Newspaper History: Los Angeles Times is Bombed

The October 1, 1910 early morning attack killed 20 and injured 100.

Via the LA Times Framework blog:

The attack didn’t stop the Oct. 1, 1910, issue of The Times; it was printed at the Los Angeles Herald.

The city of Los Angeles hired private detective William J. Burns to catch the bombers. His work led to the arrest of two brothers, John J. and James B. McNamara — members of the International Assn. of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers union.

Clarence Darrow defended the McNamaras only to lose the case when the brothers changed their pleas in open court to guilty. After the trial, Darrow was twice tried on charges of jury tampering. The first trial ended in acquittal, the second in a hung jury.

Click through for more images.

The Print Oligopoly Coming to a News Stand Near You

Quite recently, the New York TimesWashington Post, and LA Times were three of America’s best newspapers. Now, they’re each facing potentially era-ending challenges. Is there any hope for the Great American Newspaper? Sure—for the lucky ones…

Access to the best and most timely information, in the form of the best newspapers, is a significant advantage in an information economy. Twenty years from now, we’ll look back on the era of universal free online access to newspaper content as a historical aberration, and a dumb one at that.

Information isn’t free. It’s expensive. Especially if you can’t afford it.

Gawker Media grew to maturity by exposing the foibles of legacy media employees and their top brass. With one or more of the leading national papers fearing for their very existence, Gawker properties continue to show impressive growth, and their bevvy of writers no longer need malign media bigwigs in order to satisfy an increasingly broad audience. My, how the tables have turned.