Posts tagged with ‘Mashable’

You can sense when somebody wants something. It’s all about energy exchange, it’s not about words. That’s what I learned from doing Humans of New York. Somebody’s willingness to let me photograph them, and willingness to tell me a story, has nothing to do with the words I say. It all has to do with the energy I’m giving off, which hopefully is very genuine, very interested energy. It’s It’s just two people having a conversation in the street. I think that’s where genuine content comes from.

Brandon Stanton, the human behind Humans of New York, as quoted in this Mashable profile about his work and his forthcoming book.

Brandon began the project in the summer of 2010 in an effort “to construct a photographic census of New York City”. Originally, the idea was to plot the photos on map, but after speaking with 10,000 strangers (New Yorkers and visitors to NYC), he decided to turn the project into a blog which features a portrait of each person, accompanied with a quote or short story from them. Humans of New york has nearly 1.5 million Facebook fans, over 33,000 Twitter followers and Tumblr posts with notes in the thousands. 

Ironic Comic About Cell Phone Etiquette 
Comic written by Larry Lambert; illustrated by Jerry King.
Image: Mashable

Ironic Comic About Cell Phone Etiquette

Comic written by Larry Lambert; illustrated by Jerry King.

Image: Mashable

Facebook Bans Tourist Ad Due to Boobies Reference
Facebook refused to run an advertisement for Christmas Island, an Australian tourist destination known for its beautiful wildlife, because the ad referenced boobies — a kind of bird. 
According to Mashable, the advertisement was created for Christmas Island’s Bird ‘n’ Nature Week, and the ad meant to use “boobies” as a double entendre. The ad boasted of "some gorgeous shots" of some "juvenile boobies" — which were paired with images of boobies in nature (the bird kind). 
Facebook’s advertising guidelines were breached because the ad addressed ”age, gender, or sexual orientation of users on Facebook,” says Travel Daily News. 
FJP: Advertising 101: Juvenile boobies are always a touchy subject. — Krissy
Image: Mashable

Facebook Bans Tourist Ad Due to Boobies Reference

Facebook refused to run an advertisement for Christmas Island, an Australian tourist destination known for its beautiful wildlife, because the ad referenced boobies — a kind of bird. 

According to Mashable, the advertisement was created for Christmas Island’s Bird ‘n’ Nature Week, and the ad meant to use “boobies” as a double entendre. The ad boasted of "some gorgeous shots" of some "juvenile boobies" — which were paired with images of boobies in nature (the bird kind). 

Facebook’s advertising guidelines were breached because the ad addressed ”age, gender, or sexual orientation of users on Facebook,” says Travel Daily News. 

FJP: Advertising 101: Juvenile boobies are always a touchy subject. — Krissy

Image: Mashable

Medium Backs New Long-form Journalism Platform
Joshuah Bearman, the writer responsible for the article that became the film Argo, and Joshua Davis, the contributing editor at Wired, have come together to create Epic Magazine — a platform for long-form journalism and nonfiction. Their about page suggests they want people to share “good true-life tale[s]” that “grab you right from the start.”
Medium, the blogging platform created by Twitter co-founders Evan Williams and Biz Stone, is backing Epic.
Mashable: 

"Epic stories will debut on Medium, a new venture by Twitter founders Evan Williams and Biz Stone," the founders write in Epic’s ‘About’ section. "Medium is a platform built for ideas that should last. And that’s what Epic aims for: stories worth remembering."

Image: Screenshot from Epic Magazine

Medium Backs New Long-form Journalism Platform

Joshuah Bearman, the writer responsible for the article that became the film Argo, and Joshua Davis, the contributing editor at Wired, have come together to create Epic Magazine — a platform for long-form journalism and nonfiction. Their about page suggests they want people to share “good true-life tale[s]” that “grab you right from the start.”

Medium, the blogging platform created by Twitter co-founders Evan Williams and Biz Stone, is backing Epic.

Mashable: 

"Epic stories will debut on Medium, a new venture by Twitter founders Evan Williams and Biz Stone," the founders write in Epic’s ‘About’ section. "Medium is a platform built for ideas that should last. And that’s what Epic aims for: stories worth remembering."

Image: Screenshot from Epic Magazine

5 Social Media Tactics to Increase ROI →

Via Mashable

Social can be one of the most challenging platforms for brands to measure return on investment. Companies that grew up on traditional advertising and metrics often have trouble making sense of the value of the online ecosystem. But with 52% of U.S. consumers using the web as their primary purchase tool, it’s an area brands can’t afford to ignore.

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV
Via Mashable: 

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

For the First Time, U.S. Consumes More Digital Media Than TV

Via Mashable

According to an eMarketer study released Thursday, Americans spend four hours and 40 minutes online using either a mobile device or a computer, compared with four hours and 31 minutes watching TV.

FJP: Well, I know I spend a third of my life sleeping…. subtract the eight hours at work, two hours commuting… an hour for dinner and a shower… that leaves me with five whole hours to do whatever I want, and television is the answer. —Gabbi

Reactions to Mashable’s Digital Bill of Rights

Inspired by the NSA ordeal, Mashable’s collaborative Google Doc lists the digital freedoms and protections for Internet users.

Mashable:

When Edward Snowden leaked information about the U.S. government’s widespread mass surveillance programs, we learned just how vulnerable our personal information might be. We’re living in an era where digital boundaries don’t exist and governments can gain extensive access to user data without our knowledge.

In the face of these revelations, this is the moment when we must stand up and establish a Digital Bill of Rights.

We’re creating a document to highlight the digital freedoms and protections that we feel each user should be guaranteed as a citizen of the Internet, and we want your help. Below is a draft of the Digital Bill of Rights that we have crowdsourced through our social media community.

Readers can contribute suggestions directly on the document. The initiative garnered quite a few thought-provoking comments, like the ones above, which have been curated by Mashable here.

Images: Mashable

Transgender Children in California Can Choose Bathrooms and Teams Based on Gender Identity
According to The Associated Press, lawmakers in California approved a bill requiring public schools to allow transgender students to pick which bathrooms and which groups or teams they want to join based on their gender identity. Similar policies have been put into action in other school districts around the U.S., but this is the ”first time a state has mandated such treatment by statute.”
Via Mashable: 

A long debate preceded the 21-9 vote in the California State Senate, including one objection from a senator who suggested that the rules would allow mediocre male athletes to join female sports teams for competitive advantage.

FJP: Because even a mediocre male athlete is better than the best female on a sports team, apparently. (Insert growl here.) - Krissy
Image: Children celebrating Gay Pride in Durham Region Pride Parade, via Demotix

Transgender Children in California Can Choose Bathrooms and Teams Based on Gender Identity

According to The Associated Press, lawmakers in California approved a bill requiring public schools to allow transgender students to pick which bathrooms and which groups or teams they want to join based on their gender identity. Similar policies have been put into action in other school districts around the U.S., but this is the ”first time a state has mandated such treatment by statute.”

Via Mashable

A long debate preceded the 21-9 vote in the California State Senate, including one objection from a senator who suggested that the rules would allow mediocre male athletes to join female sports teams for competitive advantage.

FJP: Because even a mediocre male athlete is better than the best female on a sports team, apparently. (Insert growl here.) - Krissy

Image: Children celebrating Gay Pride in Durham Region Pride Parade, via Demotix

Asteroid Mining Company Makes Space Telescope Accessible To Public
Asteroid mining company, Planetary Resources, has acquired their goal of a million dollars from Kickstarter to fund Arkyd, a space telescope that allows ordinary people to snap selfies and other images of space. If you donate $25, you’ll get a photo of yourself displayed on the onboard screen and then receive a digital picture of your face in space (it gets pricier if you want an actual print). You can also point the telescope anywhere you want to snap your own pictures of the great beyond. 
According to Mashable, the Arkyd’s true mission isn’t to make space snapshots popular in social media, but to discover and dismember asteroids that contain trillions of dollars worth of minerals like platinum and gold. At a space conference in 2006, co-founder of Planetary Resources Peter Diamandis said, “There are $20 trillion checks up there waiting to be cashed.” 
FJP: So why not help Diamandis cash in early with some space-selfie fees? Cha-ching. - Krissy
Image: Mashable

Asteroid Mining Company Makes Space Telescope Accessible To Public

Asteroid mining company, Planetary Resources, has acquired their goal of a million dollars from Kickstarter to fund Arkyd, a space telescope that allows ordinary people to snap selfies and other images of space. If you donate $25, you’ll get a photo of yourself displayed on the onboard screen and then receive a digital picture of your face in space (it gets pricier if you want an actual print). You can also point the telescope anywhere you want to snap your own pictures of the great beyond. 

According to Mashable, the Arkyd’s true mission isn’t to make space snapshots popular in social media, but to discover and dismember asteroids that contain trillions of dollars worth of minerals like platinum and gold. At a space conference in 2006, co-founder of Planetary Resources Peter Diamandis said, “There are $20 trillion checks up there waiting to be cashed.” 

FJP: So why not help Diamandis cash in early with some space-selfie fees? Cha-ching. - Krissy

Image: Mashable

Russian Startup Designs Motorcycle Helmet With Google Glass Capabilities 

LiveMap, a Russian-based startup, is creating a motorcycle helmet with built-in navigation and visuals akin to Google Glass. The helmet will be equipped with an earpiece for alerts, a microphone for voice commands, and a digital compass for tracking head movement.

As described in LiveMap’s video introducing the project, the purpose of the helmet is to make riding and navigation easier on motorcyclists who often have to look down at screens while riding or pull over to the side of the road to operate their GPS devices. 

According to Mashable, the helmet won’t operate with iOS or Android, but it will use its own interface so users won’t be distracted by other media while riding.

LiveMap intends to ship the helmet in August 2014 starting at $1,500 - $2,000.

Coder Quits Job And Moves Into Tent To Work on Startup

Thomas Backlund is a coder who quit his job and moved into a tent in the woods near Stockholm just so he could dedicate his full attention to his startup project, blockie.io. Backlund powers his laptop, external battery, and phone with two portable Brunton 62 Watt solar panels, and cooks his food on a Primus OmniLite stove. Backlund provides updates about his experience on his website.

So, what’s a coder’s motivation to move to a forest to work on a tech project?

Via Mashable

Not only does [living in a forest] give me the time to do this but it also gives me peace of mind.

I change my location about two times per week.

Computer, forest, batteries… unpractical? Maybe it would have been more rational to keep the apartment and just cut costs?

Well, rational and right do not always align.

I have no apartment, no job, no income. Still I’m exactly where I should be. I’m on my path. My gut feeling lets me know that.

I’m not exiting to a normal life until my startup has taken off. This is my big adventure. I’m not coming back empty-handed.

Backlund has been in the woods since March and there are no reports of his startup receiving any investors yet. 

FJP: Maybe this Backlund fellow is onto something. After all, studies show that nature resets our minds and bodies and makes us more focused. Maybe we should all be creating our technology-based masterpieces in the woods or on a mountain top. I think I’ll start with a balcony, though. Baby steps. - Krissy

Images: Backlund’s personal photos from his website

Bing Now Translates Klingon Language 
Bing has just added Klingon, the language spoken by the Klingon warrior race of the Star Trek universe, to its language translator.
Via Mashable: 

Bing worked with the linguistics Ph. D. Marc Okrand who developed the language for the series. It also turned to 10 people who are fluent in the language to train the systems, as well as the Klingon Language Institute who assisted in the process.

Bing users can now even translate entire websites into Klingon.
FJP: I think I speak for everyone when I say: HIja’ tlhuchtlh! - Krissy
Image: Today I Found Out

Bing Now Translates Klingon Language 

Bing has just added Klingon, the language spoken by the Klingon warrior race of the Star Trek universe, to its language translator.

Via Mashable

Bing worked with the linguistics Ph. D. Marc Okrand who developed the language for the series. It also turned to 10 people who are fluent in the language to train the systems, as well as the Klingon Language Institute who assisted in the process.

Bing users can now even translate entire websites into Klingon.

FJP: I think I speak for everyone when I say: HIja’ tlhuchtlh! - Krissy

Image: Today I Found Out

Fashion Designers Experiment With 3D Printing
Fashion designers are using 3D printing to create garments, shoes, and accessories for their clothing lines. 
3D printers follow instructions of computer generated blueprints to create one layer of material at a time until a piece of clothing is fully formed. According to Weburbanist, soles and fasteners aren’t necessary in 3D printed garments because of the architectural specificity of the blue prints; the apparel is designed to fit an individual’s exact measurements.
The materials for 3D printed clothing and accessories are lightweight, flexible, and easy to produce, and Continnuum Fashion, a fashion start-up company, has already recognized the benefits of 3D printing their garments. Continnuum offers customers the option to design their own clothes to be printed in-house. The clothes are printed when the order is placed, so time and materials aren’t wasted.
Via Huffington Post:

In the past, when designers go to the trouble of manufacturing a dress, they have to be confident of selling hundreds to make the cost of production worthwhile.
But 3-D printing flips that idea on its head. The technology cuts a designer’s manufacturing costs to zero until a customer has ordered a garment. As a result, designers can now afford to experiment in small batches and sell apparel in limited editions.

FJP: Careful hand-stitching can now be replaced by code. And with Staples now offering mini-3D printers for your own home, does this mean that we’ll be ordering and printing clothes right in our offices? Ehhh. Probably not for awhile. 
Via Readwrite:

$1,300 for a hobbyist’s toy isn’t cheap. And that’s not counting the $50 per plastic cartridge holding 320 grams of material (0.7 pounds). Printing is expensive, whether it’s 2D or 3D.

Also, it can take HOURS to print a garment. And according to Mashable,  the larger 3D printers necessary to print a full size pair of pants can cost upwards of $14,000. (And I thought ink cartridges for 2D printers were overpriced.) — Krissy
Image: Weburbanist

Fashion Designers Experiment With 3D Printing

Fashion designers are using 3D printing to create garments, shoes, and accessories for their clothing lines. 

3D printers follow instructions of computer generated blueprints to create one layer of material at a time until a piece of clothing is fully formed. According to Weburbanist, soles and fasteners aren’t necessary in 3D printed garments because of the architectural specificity of the blue prints; the apparel is designed to fit an individual’s exact measurements.

The materials for 3D printed clothing and accessories are lightweight, flexible, and easy to produce, and Continnuum Fashion, a fashion start-up company, has already recognized the benefits of 3D printing their garments. Continnuum offers customers the option to design their own clothes to be printed in-house. The clothes are printed when the order is placed, so time and materials aren’t wasted.

Via Huffington Post:

In the past, when designers go to the trouble of manufacturing a dress, they have to be confident of selling hundreds to make the cost of production worthwhile.

But 3-D printing flips that idea on its head. The technology cuts a designer’s manufacturing costs to zero until a customer has ordered a garment. As a result, designers can now afford to experiment in small batches and sell apparel in limited editions.

FJP: Careful hand-stitching can now be replaced by code. And with Staples now offering mini-3D printers for your own home, does this mean that we’ll be ordering and printing clothes right in our offices? Ehhh. Probably not for awhile. 

Via Readwrite:

$1,300 for a hobbyist’s toy isn’t cheap. And that’s not counting the $50 per plastic cartridge holding 320 grams of material (0.7 pounds). Printing is expensive, whether it’s 2D or 3D.

Also, it can take HOURS to print a garment. And according to Mashable,  the larger 3D printers necessary to print a full size pair of pants can cost upwards of $14,000. (And I thought ink cartridges for 2D printers were overpriced.) — Krissy

Image: Weburbanist

Do Social Media Sites Like Tumblr Need Their Own News Publications?
We learned last week that Tumblr is shutting down Storyboard — the news blog responsible for reporting on creative and noteworthy posts by Tumblr users. Tumblr’s cofounder, David Karp, posted his explanation for Storyboard’s closing on the site’s staff blog, saying: “What we’ve accomplished with Storyboard has run its course for now, and our editorial team will be closing up shop and moving on.”
Karp mentions that Storyboard partnered with the likes of WNYC, Mashable, Time, etc. and was even nominated for a James Beard Award (to name a few accomplishments). So, why is it best to “move on” when the project has been so successful? 
The consensus (here, here, and here) seems to be that Tumblr needs to downsize to turn a profit this year. However, in an interview with The New York Times, Charlie Warzel, deputy technology editor at Buzzfeed, suggested Storyboard is closing because there’s no point in writing about what you can just go and see for yourself. He said:

It is always peculiar when a social network branches out into publishing, it just seems odd to bring on even excellent editorial talent to cover what is already going on organically.

And he’s not the only one who shares the sentiment. 
The New York Times calls attention to Dan Fletcher (a journalism school graduate) who quit his “amorphous” job as managing editor of Facebook in 2012. His position required him to write about FaceBook trends. He said that reporters aren’t needed on FaceBook and that articles detract from user activity that is “inherently more interesting” than the articles themselves.
FJP:  Why is it “peculiar” that an excellent editorial staff would be reporting on the “organic” events of social media communities? Isn’t that what journalists do? Just because social media communities exist in the cyber-verse doesn’t make them less newsworthy.
Admittedly, Storyboard and other social media news blogs (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest) aren’t exactly watchdog reporters (they want to talk about the posts that make themselves look good, after all), and that should make us question whether these publications can really be “journalistic.” But social media news is in its larval stage. Maybe, in the future, social communities will be publishing articles about juveniles who break copyright laws, and sites will be locking people’s profiles in cyber-jail-blocks for weeks due to hazing. Surely, social sites are gonna need some objective, guardian watchdogs for that, right? Eh? — Krissy
Image: Screenshot from Storyboard.

Do Social Media Sites Like Tumblr Need Their Own News Publications?

We learned last week that Tumblr is shutting down Storyboard — the news blog responsible for reporting on creative and noteworthy posts by Tumblr users. Tumblr’s cofounder, David Karp, posted his explanation for Storyboard’s closing on the site’s staff blog, saying: “What we’ve accomplished with Storyboard has run its course for now, and our editorial team will be closing up shop and moving on.”

Karp mentions that Storyboard partnered with the likes of WNYCMashableTime, etc. and was even nominated for a James Beard Award (to name a few accomplishments). So, why is it best to “move on” when the project has been so successful? 

The consensus (herehere, and here) seems to be that Tumblr needs to downsize to turn a profit this year. However, in an interview with The New York Times, Charlie Warzel, deputy technology editor at Buzzfeed, suggested Storyboard is closing because there’s no point in writing about what you can just go and see for yourself. He said:

It is always peculiar when a social network branches out into publishing, it just seems odd to bring on even excellent editorial talent to cover what is already going on organically.

And he’s not the only one who shares the sentiment. 

The New York Times calls attention to Dan Fletcher (a journalism school graduate) who quit his “amorphous” job as managing editor of Facebook in 2012. His position required him to write about FaceBook trends. He said that reporters aren’t needed on FaceBook and that articles detract from user activity that is “inherently more interesting” than the articles themselves.

FJP:  Why is it “peculiar” that an excellent editorial staff would be reporting on the “organic” events of social media communities? Isn’t that what journalists do? Just because social media communities exist in the cyber-verse doesn’t make them less newsworthy.

Admittedly, Storyboard and other social media news blogs (FacebookTwitterPinterest) aren’t exactly watchdog reporters (they want to talk about the posts that make themselves look good, after all), and that should make us question whether these publications can really be “journalistic.” But social media news is in its larval stage. Maybe, in the future, social communities will be publishing articles about juveniles who break copyright laws, and sites will be locking people’s profiles in cyber-jail-blocks for weeks due to hazing. Surely, social sites are gonna need some objective, guardian watchdogs for that, right? Eh? — Krissy

Image: Screenshot from Storyboard.