Posts tagged with ‘Mexico’

A Story Told Well: NPR’s Borderland 

NPR recently launched a special series, Borderland, in which Steven Inskeep traveled along the entire 2,428 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico to report on the nuances of immigration and the relationship between the two countries. Here are the radio stories, which are so worth listening to if this is an issue that you’ve had a hard time wrapping your mind around, or not seen fantastic reporting on before. And here is the stunning visual intro to the series, which breaks the piece down into 12 stories complete with moving characters, all the numbers (presented very digestibly) and a lot of context.

A Story Told Well: NPR’s Borderland 

NPR recently launched a special series, Borderland, in which Steven Inskeep traveled along the entire 2,428 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico to report on the nuances of immigration and the relationship between the two countries. Here are the radio stories, which are so worth listening to if this is an issue that you’ve had a hard time wrapping your mind around, or not seen fantastic reporting on before. And here is the stunning visual intro to the series, which breaks the piece down into 12 stories complete with moving characters, all the numbers (presented very digestibly) and a lot of context.

Readers Capture the Complexity of the US-Mexican Border

fjp-latinamerica:

What does life look like along the 2,000 miles of the US-Mexico border?

The New York Times crowdsourced reader photos, from the intimate to the aerial, to tell the visual story. 

FJP: One of the best crowdsourced interactive features we’ve seen in a long time. Yet, you will need more than a thousand pictures to really grasp what exactly is going on along the US-Mexico border, one of the busiest in the world. And, as you most certainly know, it is not only about Tijuana anymore, but about a long series of bordertowns than span all the way East until the Rio Grande Valley.

H/T: Propublica.

Univisión takes home an IRE award

fjp-latinamerica:

Univisión, the US Spanish-speaking broadcasting company, recently won an IRE award in the Broadcast Video category for their in-depth investigation on the Fast and Furious scandal, carried out by journalists Gerardo Reyes, Tomás Ocaña, Mariana Atencio, María Antonieta Collins, Tifani Roberts, Vytenis Didziulis, Margarita Rabin. 

After giving the award, the IRE judges had this to say:

In a yearlong investigation, hundreds of classified Mexican documents were obtained with great difficulty under the Mexican public access law. A database of 60,000 entries was combined with US government documents to find 57 previously unreported lost weapons under the “Fast and Furious” program and to show the depth in human cost.

Univision detailed previously unknown crimes committed with those weapons - including the shooting of 14 teens at a birthday party – and uncovered similar U.S. programs in Colombia, Honduras and Puerto Rico that also went awry.

As a result of Univision’s diligence, the Mexican Congress asked for economic compensation for the victims of massacres in which guns from the “Fast and Furious” operation were used.

A public debate erupted in Mexico on how much the Mexican government knew. Congress pressed the U.S. Justice Department for more information, and one U..S Congressman called “Rápido y Furioso” the “Holy Grail” that broke the case.

And this is a fragment of Univisión’s original submission:

Although the hundreds of classified us and Mexican government documents weren’t obtained through a FOI request, we believe our process of gathering and comparing comprehensive information from two different governments, resulted in a story that did “open records and open government” in a unique and revealing way that could not be achieved by simply filing a FOI request.

Bonus: The eight-country collaborative investigative effort Plunder in the Pacific was a runner-up in the Multiplatform category, after revealing how Asian, European and Latin American fleets have devastated what was once one of the world’s great fish stocks (jack mackerel). The project was led by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, in synergy with Latin American journalists from IDL-Reporteros (Perú) and CIPER (Chile).

Video: Courtesy of Univisión’s news show Aquí y Ahora

Innocence Assassinated: Living in Mexico’s Drug War
fjp-latinamerica:

REPORTAGE, the photojournalism branch of Getty Images, is featuring  an astounding slideshow on Mexican violence through the lens of New York-based Katie Orlinsky, one of its most talented photographers. 
For Innocence Assassinated, in order to depict how locals deal with the rampaging narco-fueled bloodshed that overwhelms their communities day after day, Katie went on a breath-taking journey through the some of the most violent regions of Mexico, such as Ciudad Juárez, the Tamaulipas borderlands, the shores of Guerrero (including Acapulco), and the P’urhépecha plateau in central Michoacán. The resulting product is pretty impressive.
So, go ahead and make sure you turn on the captions. 
Image: A destroyed sign at the entrance of Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas, México. Cover of Innocence Assassinated [PDF], via Reportage by GettyImages.

Innocence Assassinated: Living in Mexico’s Drug War

fjp-latinamerica:

REPORTAGE, the photojournalism branch of Getty Images, is featuring  an astounding slideshow on Mexican violence through the lens of New York-based Katie Orlinsky, one of its most talented photographers. 

For Innocence Assassinated, in order to depict how locals deal with the rampaging narco-fueled bloodshed that overwhelms their communities day after day, Katie went on a breath-taking journey through the some of the most violent regions of Mexico, such as Ciudad Juárez, the Tamaulipas borderlands, the shores of Guerrero (including Acapulco), and the P’urhépecha plateau in central Michoacán. The resulting product is pretty impressive.

So, go ahead and make sure you turn on the captions. 

Image: A destroyed sign at the entrance of Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas, México. Cover of Innocence Assassinated [PDF], via Reportage by GettyImages.

Let us say that you are a Mexican reporter working for peanuts at a local television station somewhere in the provinces—the state of Durango, for example—and that one day you get a friendly invitation from a powerful drug-trafficking group. Imagine that it is the Zetas, and that thanks to their efforts in your city several dozen people have recently perished in various unspeakable ways, while justice turned a blind eye. Among the dead is one of your colleagues. Now consider the invitation, which is to a press conference to be held punctually on the following Friday, at a not particularly out of the way spot just outside of town. You were, perhaps, considering going instead to a movie? Keep in mind, the invitation notes, that attendance will be taken by the Zetas.

Imagine now that you arrive on the appointed day at the stated location, and that you are greeted by several expensively dressed, highly amiable men. Once the greetings are over, they have something to say, and the tone changes. We would like you, they say, to be considerate of us in your coverage. We have seen or heard certain articles or news reports that are unfair and, dare we say, displeasing to us. Displeasing. We have our eye on you. We would like you to consider the consequences of offending us further. We know you would not look forward to the result. We give warning, but we give no quarter. You are dismissed.

Journalist Alma Guillermoprieto on Mexican journalists’s plight and risk amid the Drug War, in a profound and thoughtful piece for The New York Review of Books. 

FJP: You can follow our Mexico tag for more in-depth coverage of this situation.

(via fjp-latinamerica)

Witness: Juárez. In praise of war photographers
fjp-latinamerica:

HBO Docs is releasing a 4-part series on war photojournalism around the world, two of them located in Latin America (Ciudad Juárez, México and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). 
Journalist Mike Hale introduces the Juárez episode, via The New York Times:

“Witness: Juarez,” the first in a series of four HBO documentaries about contemporary war photographers, is the visual equivalent of a fast-paced duet, like Mozart for still camera and video camera rather than violin and viola. The photographer Eros Hoagland and the cinematographer Jared Moossy travel the deadly streets of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in tandem, and our view jumps between their lenses; their photographs and moving images echo and amplify one another.
The half-hour “Juarez,” on Monday night, is a bracing, at times mesmerizing introduction to the “Witness” series, a project of the filmmaker Michael Mann and the documentarian David Frankham, who directed three of the films. (Mr. Frankham’s contributions are “Juarez” and “Rio,” about Mr. Hoagland, and “South Sudan,” with the French photojournalist Véronique de Viguerie; Abdallah Omeish directed “Witness: Libya,” next week’s installment, which features Michael Christopher Brown.)
Mr. Hoagland, a freelancer who works frequently for The New York Times, tracks down the scenes of drug-related murders in Ciudad Juárez with the help of a Mexican photographer, Guillermo Arias, and also embeds with the Mexican police, a practice he defends as “a free ride to a place we couldn’t go alone because we’d be killed.”
He offers practical tips — “You don’t want to arrive too soon, because the gunmen are still going to be there” — as well as philosophical guidelines. After he and Mr. Moossy (who photographed all four documentaries) race to the scene of a shooting and film the victim as he staggers out of his car, calling for help and dying on the street as soldiers and police officers stand by, Mr. Hoagland says: “I wasn’t there to mourn for him. I wasn’t there to console his family. I wasn’t there to — I was there to document it. It’s a piece of history.”

FJP: A few weeks ago, we asked this question: ‘Can photojournalism erase Ciudad Juarez’s bad reputation?’
Image: Juárez, via HBO Docs.

Witness: Juárez. In praise of war photographers

fjp-latinamerica:

HBO Docs is releasing a 4-part series on war photojournalism around the world, two of them located in Latin America (Ciudad Juárez, México and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). 

Journalist Mike Hale introduces the Juárez episode, via The New York Times:

“Witness: Juarez,” the first in a series of four HBO documentaries about contemporary war photographers, is the visual equivalent of a fast-paced duet, like Mozart for still camera and video camera rather than violin and viola. The photographer Eros Hoagland and the cinematographer Jared Moossy travel the deadly streets of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in tandem, and our view jumps between their lenses; their photographs and moving images echo and amplify one another.

The half-hour “Juarez,” on Monday night, is a bracing, at times mesmerizing introduction to the “Witness” series, a project of the filmmaker Michael Mann and the documentarian David Frankham, who directed three of the films. (Mr. Frankham’s contributions are “Juarez” and “Rio,” about Mr. Hoagland, and “South Sudan,” with the French photojournalist Véronique de Viguerie; Abdallah Omeish directed “Witness: Libya,” next week’s installment, which features Michael Christopher Brown.)

Mr. Hoagland, a freelancer who works frequently for The New York Times, tracks down the scenes of drug-related murders in Ciudad Juárez with the help of a Mexican photographer, Guillermo Arias, and also embeds with the Mexican police, a practice he defends as “a free ride to a place we couldn’t go alone because we’d be killed.”

He offers practical tips — “You don’t want to arrive too soon, because the gunmen are still going to be there” — as well as philosophical guidelines. After he and Mr. Moossy (who photographed all four documentaries) race to the scene of a shooting and film the victim as he staggers out of his car, calling for help and dying on the street as soldiers and police officers stand by, Mr. Hoagland says: “I wasn’t there to mourn for him. I wasn’t there to console his family. I wasn’t there to — I was there to document it. It’s a piece of history.”

FJP: A few weeks ago, we asked this question: ‘Can photojournalism erase Ciudad Juarez’s bad reputation?

Image: Juárez, via HBO Docs.

fjp-latinamerica:

Day of the Dead (Journalists)

The Mexican chapter of the Article 19 organization has set up an amazing special site [in Spanish, yet very graphical and easy to navigate] in observance of the Day of the Dead, honoring the fallen journalists who have lost their lives in the pursuit of truth amid Mexico’s drug war. 

Here is the rationale of the project, via Artículo 19:

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican folk tradition dating from pre-Columbian times, based on the belief that people’s souls return from the underworld to visit their families and loved ones. The tradition continues to this day with a mixture of indigenous beliefs with Catholic traditions.

The colors, the music, the food, and the the celebrations take place to honor the people who no longer exist in the material world but remain alive in the spiritual realm.

Therefore, here at Article 19, we want to remember on this day the deaths of 71 journalists murdered for reasons relating to their journalistic work, pay homage to them with an altar as a sign that they have not been forgotten, and as a continuing demand for justice for each of them.

FJP: As we have noted before, Artículo 19 has been doing an outstanding job at documenting violence against journalists across Mexico. Kudos.

Pet Peeve: ‘Los’ in translation. The correct name in Spanish of said Mexican tradition is Día de Muertos, not Día de los Muertos.

Images: Papel Picado (perforated paper), by Artículo 19.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

The VO1CE Project: citizen journalism and developmentThink citizen journalism, think crowdsourcing, think video-documentaries, think advocacy, think mapping, think civic media. This is what the Vo1ce Project is about. An idea developed by Angelo Greco and Marija Govedarica focused on training citizens in underserved communities to report on sensitive issues and then publishing their findings on a web-based platform. Vo1ce’s goal is to foster community development by engaging marginalized localities in documenting and sharing information.“We decided to focus, at least on this early stage of the project, on covering censorship because the problem is everywhere, and we think it affects every single layer of the communities in the Americas”, said Greco, a graduate from The American University, during an interview in a cafe in Mexico City.Currently, Vo1ce has ongoing projects in Serbia, the USA, Mexico, Colombia and Brazil. Angelo was visiting Mexico City looking for citizen journalists, journalists, activists, and human rights advocates willing to join the censorship project that is about to take off in the Latin American countries. After his stop in Mexico, he traveled to Medellin, Colombia, also looking for supporters. (Interested in joining the cause? send an email to info@vo1ceproject.org)Why are they focusing in Latin America?The complexities of the region in terms of the challenges faced by underserved communities and the interest of professional journalists to mentor citizen journalists are a great mix they’ve found in the region, said Greco.According to Greco, the main challenges ahead for Vo1ce will be to find journalists and activists willing to join the cause, developing a friendly-yet-professional mobile app to help capture and transfer footage and then find the best way to publish the findings of their different projects in a visually compelling platform.The Vo1ce Project is an NGO currently going through a fundraising campaign.Image: Angelo and Marija founders of the Vo1ce Project.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

The VO1CE Project: citizen journalism and development

Think citizen journalism, think crowdsourcing, think video-documentaries, think advocacy, think mapping, think civic media. This is what the Vo1ce Project is about. An idea developed by Angelo Greco and Marija Govedarica focused on training citizens in underserved communities to report on sensitive issues and then publishing their findings on a web-based platform. Vo1ce’s goal is to foster community development by engaging marginalized localities in documenting and sharing information.

“We decided to focus, at least on this early stage of the project, on covering censorship because the problem is everywhere, and we think it affects every single layer of the communities in the Americas”, said Greco, a graduate from The American University, during an interview in a cafe in Mexico City.

Currently, Vo1ce has ongoing projects in Serbia, the USA, Mexico, Colombia and Brazil. Angelo was visiting Mexico City looking for citizen journalists, journalists, activists, and human rights advocates willing to join the censorship project that is about to take off in the Latin American countries. After his stop in Mexico, he traveled to Medellin, Colombia, also looking for supporters. (Interested in joining the cause? send an email to info@vo1ceproject.org)

Why are they focusing in Latin America?
The complexities of the region in terms of the challenges faced by underserved communities and the interest of professional journalists to mentor citizen journalists are a great mix they’ve found in the region, said Greco.

According to Greco, the main challenges ahead for Vo1ce will be to find journalists and activists willing to join the cause, developing a friendly-yet-professional mobile app to help capture and transfer footage and then find the best way to publish the findings of their different projects in a visually compelling platform.

The Vo1ce Project is an NGO currently going through a fundraising campaign.

Image: Angelo and Marija founders of the Vo1ce Project.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

Today, on behalf of El Faro, I receive the Anna Politkovskaya award with great pride. However, I think that such recognition should also be given to other journalists in the Central American region who are going through really alarming situations.

Nowadays, 75% of murdered journalists do not die in war zones. Instead, they are being killed deliberately only to be silenced. In fact, Mexico and Honduras are the most dangerous countries in the world to practice journalism.

Recently, an NGO passed along a questionnaire to several local journalists in Mexico and asked what could international organizations do to support their work. Several responded that they wanted a firearm, and one of them explained: “I want a gun so they cannot catch me alive.”

Carlos Dada, the news director of Central American publication El Faro, in his acceptance speech (in Spanish) of the 2012 Anna Politkovskaya Award honoring courageous investigative reporting.

Background: Dada and his colleagues operate under constant and very real threats in one of the most hazardous regions of the world for independent journalists. El Faro was also awarded the 2012 WOLA Human Rights Award last month, and the Columbia School of Journalism’s Maria Moors Cabot Prize back in 2011.

(via fjp-latinamerica)

fjp-latinamerica:

MEXODUS wins ONA 2012 award(!)
We are thrilled to see Mexodus, a student journalism project focused on border issues, listed among the winners of the 2012 Online Journalism Awards, in the category of Non-English Projects, Small/Medium. Well deserved!
Here is a part of an introductory statement by Director Zita Arocha:

Mexodus is an unprecedented bilingual student-reporting project that documents the flight of middle class families, professionals and businesses to the U.S. and safer areas of México because of soaring drug cartel violence and widespread petty crime in cities such as Ciudad Juárez.
We believe Mexodus sets the bar for future collaborate investigative journalism that builds bridges across academic, national and language borders, in this case English and Spanish, the U.S. and Mexico. The web and digital technology facilitated the collaboration, as well as expertise from professional trainers from Investigative Reporters and Editors and research by Fundación MEPI in México City. The project received funding from Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.
The result is more than 20 stories in two languages, videos, slideshows, photos, info graphics and charts produced by participation from nearly 100 student journalists from four universities, University of Texas El Paso, California State University Northridge, and Tecnológico de Monterrey in Chihuahua and México City.

FJP: According to a press release made available by the UTEP, Mexodus launched in 2010 by a $25,000 grant from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.
Bonus: A collection of congratulatory messages on Twitter. Two samples:

Big props to the student staff of Borderzine for its amazing Mexodus series, which won in the Non-English projects category @ona awards.
— UTEP (@utepnews) September 24, 2012

Mexodus, a project by Mepi and mexican students won an Online Journalism Award. Here is the story. bit.ly/n7TxMy
— Fundación MEPI (@FMEPI) September 24, 2012

Fantastic.

fjp-latinamerica:

MEXODUS wins ONA 2012 award(!)

We are thrilled to see Mexodus, a student journalism project focused on border issues, listed among the winners of the 2012 Online Journalism Awards, in the category of Non-English Projects, Small/Medium. Well deserved!

Here is a part of an introductory statement by Director Zita Arocha:

Mexodus is an unprecedented bilingual student-reporting project that documents the flight of middle class families, professionals and businesses to the U.S. and safer areas of México because of soaring drug cartel violence and widespread petty crime in cities such as Ciudad Juárez.

We believe Mexodus sets the bar for future collaborate investigative journalism that builds bridges across academic, national and language borders, in this case English and Spanish, the U.S. and Mexico. The web and digital technology facilitated the collaboration, as well as expertise from professional trainers from Investigative Reporters and Editors and research by Fundación MEPI in México City. The project received funding from Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.

The result is more than 20 stories in two languages, videos, slideshows, photos, info graphics and charts produced by participation from nearly 100 student journalists from four universities, University of Texas El Paso, California State University Northridge, and Tecnológico de Monterrey in Chihuahua and México City.

FJP: According to a press release made available by the UTEP, Mexodus launched in 2010 by a $25,000 grant from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.

Bonus: A collection of congratulatory messages on Twitter. Two samples:

Fantastic.

What can Latin America learn from the Mexican startup ecosystem? →

fjp-latinamerica:

Mexico will be the first Latin American country to set up a startup pavilion at the annual TechCrunch Disrupt event, to take place this weekend in San Francisco. Seen unthinkable a couple of years ago, why is this now being possible? Let’s see.

Via TechCrunch:

Mexico’s economy is growing 40% faster than Brazil’s, over twice as fast as the United States, and is already the world’s 14th largest economy (on a GDP based scale). With an ever growing professional middle class, the market is well poised for innovative companies… Some indicators for this are: the massive market potential across industries, especially in mobile (1 out of 5 mexicans owns a smartphone, Google calculated that by 2015 the market will have grown 70%); the quickly growing internet-connected population (40 million Mexicans are connected to the Internet. It’s the third most internet-connected OECD member), and the rapid growth of e-commerce sites (43% just last year)

The startup ecosystem is proliferating in this environment. Mexico holds the largest Startup Weekend presence outside of the United States (Mexico and the UK were the first countries to establish Startup Weekend offices). 

Universities are also taking an active role in shifting towards “the entrepreneurial mindset” and away from cultural conservatism by financing “knowledge bridges” between Mexico and Silicon Valley. Entrepreneurial centers are becoming more and more popular at universities nationwide, as well as graduate programs that focus on enticing innovation and entrepreneurship as a career path.

The government is also becoming increasingly aware of the need to advocate for local talent. Last month the official announcement came from NAFIN (Mexico’s National Financial institution) and the Secretary of Economy: there is now a public seed capital fund, which will amount to almost 30 million USD and will have two lines of investment: a seed capital fund and as a co-investor in startups.

fjp-latinamerica:

Map: Abducted journalists in Mexico since 2003
Artículo 19 has just released its latest data on the state of the protection of journalists in Mexico with regard to abductions (a total of 13 since 2003).
This time, a visual representation of the country shows the specific regions where the journalists vanished. The state of Michoacán, for instance, leads with 4 abductions. Rings a bell? 
Bonus: Artículo 19’s previous release on attacks to Mexican media.
Image: 13 Disappeared journalists in Mexico since 2003, via Artículo 19. Select to embiggen.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

fjp-latinamerica:

Map: Abducted journalists in Mexico since 2003

Artículo 19 has just released its latest data on the state of the protection of journalists in Mexico with regard to abductions (a total of 13 since 2003).

This time, a visual representation of the country shows the specific regions where the journalists vanished. The state of Michoacán, for instance, leads with 4 abductions. Rings a bell

Bonus: Artículo 19’s previous release on attacks to Mexican media.

Image: 13 Disappeared journalists in Mexico since 2003, via Artículo 19. Select to embiggen.

Follow FJP Latin America: Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook.

There are parts of the country where criminal groups decide what gets published and what doesn’t.

Jose Carreno, Ibero-American University. Al Jazeera, Mexico media office torched in Monterrey.

The News: A branch office for El Norte was attacked Sunday by armed men who doused the building with gasoline before setting it on fire. This is the third attack on a Mexican media outlet in the last month.

Background: Mexico is the world’s third most dangerous place to be a journalist, according to Reporters Without Borders. You can see some of what’s been happening by viewing our Mexico Tag.

Mexican drug cartels’ spreading influence
Via National Post:

Far from being a south-of-the-U.S.-Mexico-border problem alone, at least 1,000 U.S. cities reported the presence of at least one of four Mexican cartels in 2010. Meanwhile, south of the border, the machinery of drug creation and facilitation grinds away, spitting out addicts in the U.S. and more than 50,000 dead bodies in Mexico since 2006. The cartels are looking to spread their tentacles wider.

If you’re not following National Post, definitely do so. They. Are. Awesome.
Image: Detail from Invasion of the Drug Cartels, via National Post.

Mexican drug cartels’ spreading influence

Via National Post:

Far from being a south-of-the-U.S.-Mexico-border problem alone, at least 1,000 U.S. cities reported the presence of at least one of four Mexican cartels in 2010. Meanwhile, south of the border, the machinery of drug creation and facilitation grinds away, spitting out addicts in the U.S. and more than 50,000 dead bodies in Mexico since 2006. The cartels are looking to spread their tentacles wider.

If you’re not following National Post, definitely do so. They. Are. Awesome.

Image: Detail from Invasion of the Drug Cartels, via National Post.