Posts tagged with ‘Mubarak’

Mubarak Fail Whale via Wael Ghonim

Mubarak Fail Whale via Wael Ghonim

How we share what we share.
The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal looks at data from ShareThis, the company that makes the ubiquitous “share this” button you see on Web sites, to see how people spread the word about Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. 

While the Twitter and Facebook shares have the same rough shape, the details are interesting. Twitter sharing is much spikier, possibly driven by subevents in the overall narrative. And during the key hour in which Mubarak resigned, Twitter and Facebook sharing came very close to intersecting. Turning to the Facebook graph, you realize how big a beast the site really is. Its pattern conforms roughly to U.S. web traffic as a whole, peaking around 1:00 p.m.

How we share what we share.

The Atlantic’s Alexis Madrigal looks at data from ShareThis, the company that makes the ubiquitous “share this” button you see on Web sites, to see how people spread the word about Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. 

While the Twitter and Facebook shares have the same rough shape, the details are interesting. Twitter sharing is much spikier, possibly driven by subevents in the overall narrative. And during the key hour in which Mubarak resigned, Twitter and Facebook sharing came very close to intersecting. Turning to the Facebook graph, you realize how big a beast the site really is. Its pattern conforms roughly to U.S. web traffic as a whole, peaking around 1:00 p.m.

Muhammad Hosni Sayyid Mubarak (Arabic: محمد حسني سيد مبارك‎, Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [mæˈħæmːæd ˈħosni ˈsæjːed moˈbɑːɾɑk], Muḥammad Ḥusnī Sayyid Mubārak; born May 4, 1928[1]) was the fourth President of Egypt from 1981 to 2011.

Wikipedia’s on top of it with 81 edits to the Mubarak page thus far today.

Could The Next “Twitter Revolution” Topple The Egyptian Government?

The thing about social-media based political revolutions is that go viral very quickly. At least that’s how it seems, now that an imbroglio is sweeping through Egypt in the wake of Tunisia’s so-called Twitter Revolution. 

Via Fast Company:

"Massive street protests in Egypt are spreading virally as tech-savvy demonstrators are using Twitpic, Facebook and YouTube to disseminate videos and photographs.

Opposition leaders in Egypt declared January 25, 2011 as a “Day of Rage” where protesters would take to the street against President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule. The protesters include secularists, Islamists and Communists/ultra-left-wingers—a veritable who’s who of the Egyptian opposition. The recent overthrow of the dictatorship in Tunisia by a peaceful democratic opposition movement has presumably emboldened the masses throughout the Arab world.

Exact numbers of protesters cannot be estimated due to the ongoing events. However, a massive flood of internet photographs and videos shows a gigantic presence in Cairo, Alexandria, and other Egyptian cities.

The Egyptian government appears to be engaging in censorship methods that are either half-hearted or oblivious to the specifics of social media. Contrary to early reports, Twitter has not been blocked in Egypt. However, cell phone towers were deactivated in several areas according to trusted sources.”

Photos, videos, cell phone pics and more on the story here.