Posts tagged with ‘NPR’

A Story Told Well: NPR’s Borderland 

NPR recently launched a special series, Borderland, in which Steven Inskeep traveled along the entire 2,428 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico to report on the nuances of immigration and the relationship between the two countries. Here are the radio stories, which are so worth listening to if this is an issue that you’ve had a hard time wrapping your mind around, or not seen fantastic reporting on before. And here is the stunning visual intro to the series, which breaks the piece down into 12 stories complete with moving characters, all the numbers (presented very digestibly) and a lot of context.

A Story Told Well: NPR’s Borderland 

NPR recently launched a special series, Borderland, in which Steven Inskeep traveled along the entire 2,428 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico to report on the nuances of immigration and the relationship between the two countries. Here are the radio stories, which are so worth listening to if this is an issue that you’ve had a hard time wrapping your mind around, or not seen fantastic reporting on before. And here is the stunning visual intro to the series, which breaks the piece down into 12 stories complete with moving characters, all the numbers (presented very digestibly) and a lot of context.

Erotica Controversies
The 1st District Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted inmate Andres Martinez the right to read a werewolf erotica novel in prison. The book in question was The Silver Crown by Mathilde Madden (a pseudonym used by Guardian contributor, Mathilda Gregory).
NPR says the two year legal battle to read the book began when guards at Pelican Bay State Prison confiscated the novel on the grounds that it was pornographic. 
According to TIME, California banned porn from prisons in 2002 to prevent inmates from creating a “hostile work environment” for female guards. But in the 1973 case of Miller vs. California, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if a literary work has scientific or political value, it can’t be deemed “obscene.” Outlawing all works that describe sex would go against the standard. 
So, after 30 pages of decision making, the court decided that the book possesses “serious literary value” and doesn’t qualify as straight up porn. The Warden of Pelican Bay State Prison has been ordered to “allow petitioner to receive, possess, and read his copy of The Silver Crown.” Victory.
And if this erotica scandal isn’t hot enough for the press, the first female deputy CIA director, Avril Haines, is being what Salon calls “slut-shamed” for hosting “erotica nights.”
According to The Daily Beast, in the 1990s, Haines co-owned Adrian’s Book Cafe in Baltimore, Md. The cafe used to feature events where published guests would read their erotic prose. Apparently, Haines even read some racy excerpts herself from Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty Trilogy. 
FJP: What does any of this have to do with the fact that Haines is the new CIA director? Nothing. So why bring it up?
Media Matters suggests that the press applies a “shockingly different standard” to what they cover in regards to accomplished females vs. males in Washington D.C. The media assumes that a woman’s sexuality, or even what she wears, defines who she is (see: Purse Politics: Tote and Vote), and that’s a standard that’s “almost never applied to male counterparts.” 
Would this story be being beaten to death (here, here, here, here, here, and here, to name only a few articles) if Haines was a man who used to be into smutty reading nights? Or is a woman’s sexuality just infinitely more interesting? Also… if a male inmate can read what he wants, shouldn’t Haines have the same right? - Krissy
Image: Salon 

Erotica Controversies

The 1st District Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted inmate Andres Martinez the right to read a werewolf erotica novel in prison. The book in question was The Silver Crown by Mathilde Madden (a pseudonym used by Guardian contributor, Mathilda Gregory).

NPR says the two year legal battle to read the book began when guards at Pelican Bay State Prison confiscated the novel on the grounds that it was pornographic. 

According to TIME, California banned porn from prisons in 2002 to prevent inmates from creating a “hostile work environment” for female guards. But in the 1973 case of Miller vs. California, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if a literary work has scientific or political value, it can’t be deemed “obscene.” Outlawing all works that describe sex would go against the standard. 

So, after 30 pages of decision making, the court decided that the book possesses “serious literary value” and doesn’t qualify as straight up porn. The Warden of Pelican Bay State Prison has been ordered to “allow petitioner to receive, possess, and read his copy of The Silver Crown.” Victory.

And if this erotica scandal isn’t hot enough for the press, the first female deputy CIA director, Avril Haines, is being what Salon calls “slut-shamed” for hosting “erotica nights.”

According to The Daily Beast, in the 1990s, Haines co-owned Adrian’s Book Cafe in Baltimore, Md. The cafe used to feature events where published guests would read their erotic prose. Apparently, Haines even read some racy excerpts herself from Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty Trilogy

FJP: What does any of this have to do with the fact that Haines is the new CIA director? Nothing. So why bring it up?

Media Matters suggests that the press applies a “shockingly different standard” to what they cover in regards to accomplished females vs. males in Washington D.C. The media assumes that a woman’s sexuality, or even what she wears, defines who she is (see: Purse Politics: Tote and Vote), and that’s a standard that’s “almost never applied to male counterparts.” 

Would this story be being beaten to death (hereherehereherehere, and here, to name only a few articles) if Haines was a man who used to be into smutty reading nights? Or is a woman’s sexuality just infinitely more interesting? Also… if a male inmate can read what he wants, shouldn’t Haines have the same right? - Krissy

Image: Salon 

Ray Harryhausen, Special Effects Extraordinaire, Passes Away
Ray Harryhausen, the man responsible for stop-motion animation in such films as Jason And The Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), died at 92-years-old on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.
Via Huffington Post:

Though his on-screen credit was often simply “technical effects” or “special visual effects,” Mr. Harryhausen usually played a principal creative role in the films featuring his work. He frequently proposed the initial concept, scouted the locations and shaped the story, script, art direction and design around his ideas for fresh ways to amaze an audience.

Other than Harryhausen’s impressive ability to multitask in all areas of film production, his approach to animation was unique and notable in that he didn’t want his fantasy creatures to appear real to the audience. 
Via Mashable:

Two things for those of us weaned on CGI to notice here. Firstly, although these clay models are made to seem like living, breathing creatures, Harryhausen didn’t intend to replicate reality. He was looking for that curious, nightmarish effect stop-motion can have. “If you make fantasy too real,” he said, “it loses the quality of a dream.”

FJP: Harryhausen is being called “The Master of Stop Motion,” by NPR, “A Visual Effects Guru” by The Los Angeles Times, and the “Hollywood Effects Wizard,” by USA Today. But to an ex-film-school rat who spent a good chunk of her educational years analyzing and worshipping the pioneers of sci-fi special effects — he’s nothing but LEGEND.  And through his works of creative genius, his legend will live on. - Krissy
Image: Ray Harryhausen with some of his creatures, Huffington Post

Ray Harryhausen, Special Effects Extraordinaire, Passes Away

Ray Harryhausen, the man responsible for stop-motion animation in such films as Jason And The Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), died at 92-years-old on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.

Via Huffington Post:

Though his on-screen credit was often simply “technical effects” or “special visual effects,” Mr. Harryhausen usually played a principal creative role in the films featuring his work. He frequently proposed the initial concept, scouted the locations and shaped the story, script, art direction and design around his ideas for fresh ways to amaze an audience.

Other than Harryhausen’s impressive ability to multitask in all areas of film production, his approach to animation was unique and notable in that he didn’t want his fantasy creatures to appear real to the audience. 

Via Mashable:

Two things for those of us weaned on CGI to notice here. Firstly, although these clay models are made to seem like living, breathing creatures, Harryhausen didn’t intend to replicate reality. He was looking for that curious, nightmarish effect stop-motion can have. “If you make fantasy too real,” he said, “it loses the quality of a dream.”

FJP: Harryhausen is being called “The Master of Stop Motion,” by NPR, “A Visual Effects Guru” by The Los Angeles Times, and the “Hollywood Effects Wizard,” by USA Today. But to an ex-film-school rat who spent a good chunk of her educational years analyzing and worshipping the pioneers of sci-fi special effects — he’s nothing but LEGEND.  And through his works of creative genius, his legend will live on. - Krissy

Image: Ray Harryhausen with some of his creatures, Huffington Post

The She Works: Note to Self Tumblr is an NPR creation that’s part of The Changing Lives of Women series. Advice that’s helped you at work, to women, from women.
You can create your own note card and print it out, if you like. Pictured above is a quote a lovely working lady once shared with me. Wise words, especially for entrepreneurial women. Lady journos, get on this. —Jihii 

The She Works: Note to Self Tumblr is an NPR creation that’s part of The Changing Lives of Women series. Advice that’s helped you at work, to women, from women.

You can create your own note card and print it out, if you like. Pictured above is a quote a lovely working lady once shared with me. Wise words, especially for entrepreneurial women. Lady journos, get on this. —Jihii 

Public Radio Bracket Madness: Down to the Elite Eight
Who you got? All Things Considered v Radiolab; Fresh Air v Talk of the Nation; The Moth Radio Hour v Wait Wait; BBC Newshour v This American Life. 
Going to be tight. Voting’s here.
If I were a betting man, I’d go RadioLab v This American Life in the finals. And then… my head explodes. — Michael
Image: Public Radio Bracket Madness by Southern California Public Radio. Select to embiggen.

Public Radio Bracket Madness: Down to the Elite Eight

Who you got? All Things Considered v Radiolab; Fresh Air v Talk of the Nation; The Moth Radio Hour v Wait Wait; BBC Newshour v This American Life. 

Going to be tight. Voting’s here.

If I were a betting man, I’d go RadioLab v This American Life in the finals. And then… my head explodes. — Michael

Image: Public Radio Bracket Madness by Southern California Public Radio. Select to embiggen.

NPR

Let’s Talk Literally

Does it matter if you use the word correctly?

Via NPR.

Dear Mr. President: Share what you want out of Obama's second term on NPR →

It’s pretty simple to do, and very interesting to explore:

Take a photo of yourself holding a sign with a key word or phrase you want the president to remember.

Then explain, in as many words as you want, what you mean and see yourself here.

NPR News App Team released best practices as GitHub repo

NPR Apps best practices for READMEs, HTML & CSS, Javascript, GIT, and more.

Not only useful for wannabe journo-coders, but also helps you get a sense of NPR tackling traditional journalism issues like style consistency beyond the written copy in the modern technology. And props to them for making it available on GitHub.

Considering the millions of followers she’s brought to our sites, you may be surprised to hear how much Mel hates being the center of attention. Really. But since so many of our listeners know her social-media voice, I didn’t want her to get away without you hearing her spoken voice — so in the audio above, you’ll hear a few words of farewell directly from her.

Terry Gross (via nprfreshair)

From this side of the Internet, we thank Mel for enlightening our dashboards. You’ll be missed. Onward and upward. Good luck at medical school. — The FJP.

Sources, Attribution and Transparency: It's an Ethics Thing →

After the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, a common story that’s appeared is what “ordinary” Americans think of the decision.

Both NPR and NBC canvased the country to get insight. And both, somehow, end up interviewing a New Jersey man named Joe Olivo. In each report, he’s presented as a small business owner who says that the Affordable Care Act will either prevent him from hiring more people or force him to stop offering health insurance at all.

What neither report mentions is that Olivo is a member of the National Federation of Independent Business, a group that opposes the Affordable Care Act, has testified in congressional hearings against the act and has appeared numerous times on television stating the same.

Via Balloon Juice:

Wow — two news organizations covering the same story scoured the nation for a random small business owner to comment on that story — and they both found the same one! How’d that happen? What are the odds?

Well, as it turns out, Joe Olivo of Perfect Printing turns up quite a bit in public discussions of this and other issues. Here he is testifying against the health care law before House and Senate committees in January 2011. Here he is on the Fox Business Network around the same time, discussing the same subject. Here he is a few days ago, also on Fox Business, talking to John Stossel about the law. Here he is discussing the same subject on a New Jersey Fox affiliate.

And here he is in July 2010 discussing small business hiring with Neil Cavuto on Fox News. Here he is opposing an increase in the minimum wage in an MSNBC debate a couple of weeks ago.

Go to many of these links and you find out something about Joe Olivo that NPR and NBC didn’t tell you: he’s a member of the National Federation of Independent Business. NFIB’s site and YouTube page promote many of Olivo’s public appearances. He was the subject of an NFIB “My Voice in Washington” online video in 2011.

NFIB, you will not be surprised to learn, is linked to the ALEC and Karl Rove’s Crossroads GPS, and to the usual rogues’ gallery of right-wing zillionaires.

So Joe Olivo isn’t just some random business owner — he’s dispatched by NFIB whenever there’s a need for someone to play a random small business owner on TV.

Thanks, NPR and NBC — you asked us to smell the grass, and you didn’t even notice it was Astroturf. Or you noticed, but you didn’t want us to.

Is it wrong for NPR and NBC to use Olivo as a source in their reporting? Most certainly not. Is it wrong for neither of them to mention that Olivo has opposed health care reform and is a member of a national organization actively opposing it as well? Absolutely.

Basically, it’s a matter of identifying sources in their entirety so that the public can make its judgement on the reliability of his or her statements. And if that sounds like something from the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics, it should. It’s item number three.

Or, as NPR writes in its ethics handbook:

If it is important for listeners or readers to know, for example, what political party the source is from, we report that information. If it is important to know what agency the source is from, we report that. If it is important to know which side of an issue the source represents, we report that.

Unfortunately, this is how reporting often works. A small case this, but remember the 2008 New York Times investigation that examined the role “military experts” play on TV. In that article we learned that “most of the analysts have ties to military contractors vested in the very war policies they are asked to assess on air,” and that those affiliations were seldom, if ever, disclosed to the public.

Bonus: The Pew Center Project for Excellence in Journalism’s link list to ethics guidelines of news organizations around the world.

pushinghoopswithsticks:

[via]

FJP: Brilliant.

Reports on the media habits of Millennials, those “digital natives”, have given some the impression that young people never read newspapers. However, survey evidence stubbornly insists that they do.

Wrote Katy Pape at NPR’s Go Figure, on a survey of millennials that reported 52% of people ages 18 to 24 read a newspaper up to 14 times a month.

It’s the heavy reading, though, that betrays their age: only 22% of millennials read the newspaper on a daily basis, as opposed to the 40% of all adults.

But the most interesting part? The prestige that comes with a heavy newspaper diet:

Heavy newspaper readers (groups I and II) are 75% more likely than light/non readers (groups IV and V) to hold a graduate degree. Heavy readers are also more than twice as likely to be considered “Influentials,” meaning people who participate in three or more public engagement activities every year (such as writing a letter to an elected official, running for public office, or attending a public meeting).

But that can’t mean that one needs to read the paper to be an important person in civic life. It just means that we’re in a shift, hopefully, which we all probably know already.

Just ask Scott M. Fulton:

The ongoing death of newspapers is not about changes in journalism, or the need for them. It is about a business model that has ceased to be relevant in the face of present technology.

FJP: Think LP vs. CD? Or, actually, CD vs. mp3.

"News just reads better on paper, man."

A new NPR show debuts today
Fans of radio, TED, and brains (see today’s theme) may enjoy NPR’s latest show, which holds interviews with TED speakers, and gets them to elaborate on their research or passions. It’s called TED Radio Hour.

A new NPR show debuts today

Fans of radio, TED, and brains (see today’s theme) may enjoy NPR’s latest show, which holds interviews with TED speakers, and gets them to elaborate on their research or passions. It’s called TED Radio Hour.