posts about or somewhat related to ‘NY Times’

But the more we study the images, the more we see that aging does not define these women. Even as the images tell us, in no uncertain terms, that this is what it looks like to grow old, this is the irrefutable truth, we also learn: This is what endurance looks like.

Susan Minot, Forty Portraits in Forty Years, NYT Magazine.

Photographer Nicholas Nixon has taken the same portrait of his wife and her three sisters every year since 1975. Go look at them. Her writing interspersed through the gallery, Susan Minot reflects beautifully:

To watch a person change over time can trick us into thinking we share an intimacy, and yet somehow we don’t believe that these poses and expressions are the final reflection of the Brown sisters. The sisters allow us to observe them, but we are not allowed in… These subjects are not after attention, a rare quality in this age when everyone is not only a photographer but often his own favorite subject. In this, Nixon has pulled off a paradox: The creation of photographs in which privacy is also the subject.

I came to the US some 49 years ago, a young refugee, lucky to have fled an Eastern European communist country. I felt that I must earn my American citizenship by working hard and perfecting my English. My girl friend, a genuine girl from Brooklyn, N.Y. Said to me: “You wanna speak good English? You gotta read the New York Times. Every day. O.K.”

William Pavlov, now a long-time NY Times reader who is an attorney in Miami Beach, left that comment on the new Times Insider, a new behind-the-scenes Times Premier feature.

Times Insider came along with Times Premier, one of a set of new subscription plans and offerings launched last month that offers readers who are willing to pay $45 a month services like Times Insider (a behind-the-scenes look at how big stories are reported), TBooks (single-subject compilations of past articles), family access and more.

Pro Tip: The idea behind Insider is to create a more informed readership. While all that sounds appealing, if you’re not a big-time fan like William and not trying to pay for Premier, you can always read excellent news about how the news was made over at CJR and especially IJNet, while also diversifying your news diet.

Why was ‘Dasani’ shut out of the Pulitzers? →

Remember this beautiful long-form piece from the NY Times that came out last fall? It was met with a wide array of reactions, some very appreciative, some very unhappy. Over the last few months, Columbia J-School’s Bill Grueskin set out to gather perspectives on why:

I don’t know why Dasani was shut out of not just a Pulitzer, but a nomination from jurors. It did, after all, win a coveted Polk award earlier this year. And though I work just down the hall from the office of Pulitzer Administrator Sig Gissler, I know less about the internal machinations of jurors and board members now than I did when I was a city editor at the Miami Herald in the 1990s. But I do know that many readers found the Dasani story, for all its soaring prose and worthy ambitions, a difficult piece of work.

To understand more about why the piece elicited such strong reactions on both sides, I reached out to about 50 people shortly after the series ended last December. I blind copied them on an email in which I invited them to take part in a private, online discussion about the series. They emailed their thoughts, and I compiled and shared them. We abided by “Chatham House Rules,” which allow quotes to be used—but not the names or affiliations of the people who said them.

The group included journalists, scientists, lawyers, faculty members and a few former and current Columbia students. It also included alumni of the Times, but not current staff, nor any Pulitzer board members.

Why did I pick this story to examine? In part because the Times thought it to be so significant. Its public editor, Margaret Sullivan, called the series “the largest investigation The Times has published all at once in its history.” Moreover, it was stirring up a tremendous reaction, not just among journalists but all around New York City. Indeed, two of Michael Bloomberg’s deputy mayors took to the edit page of the Wall Street Journal to defend their boss’ record on homelessness.

FJP: He compiles the reactions here, a predominant one being that it shouldn’t have been produced as a single story. They are worth looking through because they touch on some ethical and a lot of design issues that are relevant across the industry. These considerations shouldn’t be the absolute measure on what makes a story prize-worthy  because Dasani certainly is a compelling and generally well-executed narrative. But they are still worth thinking about. —Jihii

Members of his staff — most of them young and working on a newspaper for the first time — referred to him with varying degrees of affection and apprehension as “Oz the Great and Terrible.”

Mr. Rensenbrink referred to himself as a “working hippie,” shaped by counterculture values and a blue-collar work ethic. He was, by most accounts, a tough boss.

From the NY Times obit for James Rensenbrik, founder of the enduring alternative newspaper, The Aquarian Weekly.

The Aquarian Weekly, headquartered in various northern New Jersey storefronts and warehouses in its 44 years, has outlived most of its underground cohort. After The Village Voice and The San Francisco Bay Guardian were taken over by corporate newspaper chains in recent years, The Aquarian claimed to be one of the last independent alternative papers in the country left standing and one of the oldest continuously published ones.

Mr. Rensenbrink, who died on Nov. 6 in Grants Pass, Ore., at 81, received offers over the years from chains looking to buy The Aquarian, with its circulation of 45,000. He said no each time. By the time he retired in 1999 and moved to Oregon, he had arranged to transfer ownership to an employee cooperative. The co-op has been publishing the paper — in print and online editions — ever since.

He’s a fascinating man with a fascinating legacy. The Aquarian Weekly staff write about meeting and working with him in this tribute on their site. Worth reading. 

How Much Do You Know about the News?
The Nation recently sent out a Fox or Fiction News Quiz that asks viewers to guess which of a series of headlines are real Fox News headlines. The larger point is to establish themselves as a necessary force against what they see as ludicrous reporting from Fox and get people to support The Nation.
But setting that point aside, sometimes news quizzes are fun. And useful. Wading through continuous streams of information all day make weeks hard to separate sometimes. In the spirit of literacy and fun, Slate offers a weekly news quiz with Jeopardy champ Ken Jennings. The NY Times has a 5 question daily based on a given day’s paper. And, if you want to see how you compare to the rest of the nation by age, gender and education, take the Pew Research Center’s News IQ Quiz. 
Got any news quizzes you particularly like? Let us know. —Jihii
Image: A Fox headline from The Nation’s Fox or Fiction New Quiz. (Sorry, it’s an answer spoiler for one of the questions.)

How Much Do You Know about the News?

The Nation recently sent out a Fox or Fiction News Quiz that asks viewers to guess which of a series of headlines are real Fox News headlines. The larger point is to establish themselves as a necessary force against what they see as ludicrous reporting from Fox and get people to support The Nation.

But setting that point aside, sometimes news quizzes are fun. And useful. Wading through continuous streams of information all day make weeks hard to separate sometimes. In the spirit of literacy and fun, Slate offers a weekly news quiz with Jeopardy champ Ken Jennings. The NY Times has a 5 question daily based on a given day’s paper. And, if you want to see how you compare to the rest of the nation by age, gender and education, take the Pew Research Center’s News IQ Quiz

Got any news quizzes you particularly like? Let us know. —Jihii

Image: A Fox headline from The Nation’s Fox or Fiction New Quiz. (Sorry, it’s an answer spoiler for one of the questions.)

The problem with the cutbacks in professional foreign coverage is not just the loss of experience and wisdom. It’s the rise of — and exploitation of — the Replacements, a legion of freelancers, often untrained and too often unsupported. They gravitate to the bang-bang, because that’s what editors and broadcast producers will pay for. And chances are that nobody has their backs.

Bill Keller, It’s the Golden Age of NewsNY Times.

Keller points out that despite the fact papers have fewer and fewer experienced correspondents on staff, our access to those who are doing the work is unprecedented (and often free). Cutbacks have led to the rise of freelancers, who often lack the support needed to conduct their work as safely as they ought to be able to. He writes:

Some of them, of course, are tremendously talented, and many prefer freelance work over staff jobs for the freedom to cover what interests them. But for most of them, I suspect, it’s not a choice. Freelance work has long been a way to break into the business of international reporting; nowadays, increasingly, it is the business.

FJP: It’s an important read. I’ve got a friend who, while not a foreign correspondent, has been freelancing in the broadcast industry for years. And while she’s won two Peabody’s for her work, she’s struggled to maintain a livable salary with benefits. The fact that such a dichotomy can exist speaks for itself. —Jihii

That’s what live television is these days — just a starting point. On-demand viewing behaviors, which have been reshaping television since the first TiVo DVR was shipped in 1999, are becoming more pronounced with each passing year, sometimes to the benefit of networks and advertisers and other times to their detriment.
Brooklyn-based Pop Up Photo Exhibit Shows a Year in the Life of a NY Times Photographer
Lens Blog:

What’s contained in a year? For Tyler Hicks, a staff photographer for The New York Times, it’s trips to places like Gaza or Syria and photographing the longstanding yet reliably devastating conflicts there. Or to the Gulf of Oman, where the aircraft carrier he was on, covering a different story with C. J. Chivers, changed course suddenly to pursue and capture Somali pirates.
Or to the Congolese jungles in Central Africa, chasing a story on poaching, which meant chasing poachers and their prey.
“I’m used to having stuff happen in front of me,” said Mr. Hicks, 44, jet-lagged from his recent wedding in Massachusetts — did we mention he just got married? — to his home in Nairobi, Kenya. “This was different for me, because for the most part, I was photographing animals.”

The subject, he added, “is elusive, you have to really chase it — it’s actually trying to get away from you.”

His work will be exhibited at Photoville, a Brooklyn-based pop up photo destination built from freight containers. The village will include exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, night-time projections and a beer and food garden. It’s open from September 19 through September 29. Details here.
Image: A photo by Tyler Hicks via NY Times Lens Blog. According to the caption, one of the worst massacres for elephants anywhere in the world has been in Sakouma National Park in Chad, where the elephant population has been reduced by 90% in 10 years. See the full set here. Some photos are horrifying.

Brooklyn-based Pop Up Photo Exhibit Shows a Year in the Life of a NY Times Photographer

Lens Blog:

What’s contained in a year? For Tyler Hicks, a staff photographer for The New York Times, it’s trips to places like Gaza or Syria and photographing the longstanding yet reliably devastating conflicts there. Or to the Gulf of Oman, where the aircraft carrier he was on, covering a different story with C. J. Chivers, changed course suddenly to pursue and capture Somali pirates.

Or to the Congolese jungles in Central Africa, chasing a story on poaching, which meant chasing poachers and their prey.

“I’m used to having stuff happen in front of me,” said Mr. Hicks, 44, jet-lagged from his recent wedding in Massachusetts — did we mention he just got married? — to his home in Nairobi, Kenya. “This was different for me, because for the most part, I was photographing animals.”

The subject, he added, “is elusive, you have to really chase it — it’s actually trying to get away from you.”

His work will be exhibited at Photoville, a Brooklyn-based pop up photo destination built from freight containers. The village will include exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, night-time projections and a beer and food garden. It’s open from September 19 through September 29. Details here.

Image: A photo by Tyler Hicks via NY Times Lens Blog. According to the caption, one of the worst massacres for elephants anywhere in the world has been in Sakouma National Park in Chad, where the elephant population has been reduced by 90% in 10 years. See the full set here. Some photos are horrifying.

The First Ever NY Times Indie Online Film Festival
Indiewire:

Those who won’t be at Toronto this week can still enjoy a taste of the film festival experience from home. Today, the New York Times launches its first ever Indie Online Film Festival, a free series of four films curated by the nonprofit Film Independent. The films are available to watch from September 3 to October 2.
The online festival includes two feature length and two short form films from rising independent filmmakers who represent a broad range of styles. Each of these films has played festivals previously but this series marks their debut for a worldwide audience.

FJP: And the empire expands. Check out the four films here.

The First Ever NY Times Indie Online Film Festival

Indiewire:

Those who won’t be at Toronto this week can still enjoy a taste of the film festival experience from home. Today, the New York Times launches its first ever Indie Online Film Festival, a free series of four films curated by the nonprofit Film Independent. The films are available to watch from September 3 to October 2.

The online festival includes two feature length and two short form films from rising independent filmmakers who represent a broad range of styles. Each of these films has played festivals previously but this series marks their debut for a worldwide audience.

FJP: And the empire expands. Check out the four films here.

NY Times to Release Gesture-based App 
via TechCrunch:

The New York Times says it plans to release a Top News app for Leap Motion, the soon-to-be-released controller that will allow users to interact with their computers through gestures — in fact, it will be the only branded news app for the platform’s launch.
In the case of The Times’ app, users should be able to browse articles by moving their hands left and right. Headlines, images, and summaries will be presented in a card format, and if you see something that interests you, you tap on the card to read the full article. You then scroll through the article by making a circular motion, and you shake your hand to return to the Top News menu.
For now, the app only includes top stories, and there’s no integration with the company’s subscription system. Paul Smurl, The Times’ general manager of core digital products, told me that if the app is popular, the team could go further, adding more content and a login system for Times subscribers.
[…] Apparently Times team members met with Leap Motion while at South by Southwest, and they were impressed by what they saw. The Leap Motion controller, Smurl said, “is much more fine-tuned and sensitive to hand and finger motions than some of the competing technologies out there. … It has enough fine motor sensitivity that a reading experience is enabled and it’s pretty damn good.”

Image: TechCrunch, screen still of New York Times On Leap Motion.

NY Times to Release Gesture-based App 

via TechCrunch:

The New York Times says it plans to release a Top News app for Leap Motion, the soon-to-be-released controller that will allow users to interact with their computers through gestures — in fact, it will be the only branded news app for the platform’s launch.

In the case of The Times’ app, users should be able to browse articles by moving their hands left and right. Headlines, images, and summaries will be presented in a card format, and if you see something that interests you, you tap on the card to read the full article. You then scroll through the article by making a circular motion, and you shake your hand to return to the Top News menu.

For now, the app only includes top stories, and there’s no integration with the company’s subscription system. Paul Smurl, The Times’ general manager of core digital products, told me that if the app is popular, the team could go further, adding more content and a login system for Times subscribers.

[…] Apparently Times team members met with Leap Motion while at South by Southwest, and they were impressed by what they saw. The Leap Motion controller, Smurl said, “is much more fine-tuned and sensitive to hand and finger motions than some of the competing technologies out there. … It has enough fine motor sensitivity that a reading experience is enabled and it’s pretty damn good.”

Image: TechCrunch, screen still of New York Times On Leap Motion.

And I am not advising younger women (or any woman) to tough it out. You can lash back, which I have done too often and which has rarely served me well. You can quit and look for other jobs, which is sometimes a very good idea. But the prejudice will follow you. What will save you is tacking into the love of the work, into the desire that brought you there in the first place. This creates a suspension of time, opens a spacious room of your own in which you can walk around and consider your response. Staring prejudice in the face imposes a cruel discipline: to structure your anger, to achieve a certain dignity, an angry dignity.

How to Legalize Pot →

Challenges include: the DOJ, since anyone who trades in cannabis is still a felon according to federal law; big profiteers, since the cannabis industry could easily become controlled like Big Tobacco; and how to measure drugged driving, since the government hasn’t funded too much research on the chemistry of weed in the human body.

You can read Kleinman’s proposal to Washington State here.

Do not use illegal as a noun, and avoid the sinister-sounding alien.

A new entry in The New York Times’ stylebook on “illegal immigrant”.

Background:

On Tuesday afternoon, a group of advocates against the use of the term “illegal immigrant” gathered outside The New York Times building in Times Square to deliver a petition of protest. Organizers said the petition, which asked the paper to stop using the phrase contained more than 70,000 signatures collected online.

And here is the new entry, (by way of Poynter, if you’re looking for context):

illegal immigrant may be used to describe someone who enters, lives in or works in the United States without proper legal authorization. But be aware that in the debate over immigration, some people view it as loaded or offensive. Without taking sides or resorting to euphemism, consider alternatives when appropriate to explain the specific circumstances of the person in question, or to focus on actions: who crossed the border illegallywho overstayed a visawho is not authorized to work in this country.

Unauthorized is also an acceptable description, though it has a bureaucratic tone. Undocumented is the term preferred by many immigrants and their advocates, but it has a flavor of euphemism and should be used with caution outside quotations. Illegal immigration, because it describes the issue rather than an individual, is less likely thanillegal immigrant to be seen as troubling.

Take particular care in describing people whose immigration status is complex or subject to change – for example, young people brought to this country as children, many of whom are eligible for temporary reprieves from deportation under federal policies adopted in 2012.

Do not use illegal as a noun, and avoid the sinister-sounding alien.

A newspaper published a story about the Surgeon General’s office that contained information about the size and location of the Army of the Potomac. A furious Hooker complained to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton that the chief of the Secret Service “would have willingly paid $1,000 for such information” about Confederate forces.

Ford Risely, The New York Times, Birth of the Byline.

Risley, a professor of communications and head of Penn State’s journalism department takes us through Civil War era journalism and how the byline came to be.

Indeed, during the first two years of the war, an increasingly aggressive and competitive press had published stories that infuriated military leaders on both sides. The Civil War was the first war widely covered by American newspapers. And in their zeal to report the greatest event of their lives, newsmen produced a decidedly mixed bag of stories.

On one hand, many reporters honestly and faithfully chronicled the fighting. Tireless correspondents went to extraordinary lengths to report stories, often on tight deadlines. However, other newsmen mistakenly, and in some cases recklessly, reported the conflict. Correspondents less concerned with the facts and more interested in rushing stories into print wrote damaging stories that hurt their side.

Following the journalistic practice of the day, correspondents wrote anonymously during the war, most using a pen name or no name at all. Newsmen liked the custom, believing the secrecy allowed them do their work better. As one reporter wrote, “The anonymous greatly favors freedom and boldness in newspaper correspondence … . Besides the responsibility it fastens on a correspondent, the signature inevitably detracts from the powerful impersonality of a journal.”

However, commanders did not like the practice because newsmen often could not be held accountable for what they wrote. McClellan had complained to Stanton of reporters repeatedly “giving important information” about the Army in their stories. “As it is impossible for me to ascertain with certainty who these anonymous writers are,” he wrote, “I beg to suggest that another order be published holding the editors responsible for its infraction.”

After the news leak, General Order No. 48 was issued, which required that all reporters with the Army of the Potomac—of which Hooker (mentioned above) was commander—“publish their communications over their own signatures.” 

And the byline was born.

Related: A few more thoughts on journalism history from our archives.